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The Age of Surveillance Capitalism

The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power
Lu par : Nicol Zanzarella
Durée : 24 h et 16 min
5 out of 5 stars (2 notations)

Prix : 27,65 €

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Description

The challenges to humanity posed by the digital future, the first detailed examination of the unprecedented form of power called "surveillance capitalism", and the quest by powerful corporations to predict and control our behavior.

Shoshana Zuboff's interdisciplinary breadth and depth enable her to come to grips with the social, political, business, and technological meaning of the changes taking place in our time. We are at a critical juncture in the confrontation between the vast power of giant high-tech companies and government, the hidden economic logic of surveillance capitalism, and the propaganda of machine supremacy that threaten to shape and control human life. Will the brazen new methods of social engineering and behavior modification threaten individual autonomy and democratic rights and introduce extreme new forms of social inequality? Or will the promise of the digital age be one of individual empowerment and democratization?

The Age of Surveillance Capitalism is neither a hand-wringing narrative of danger and decline nor a digital fairy tale. Rather, it offers a deeply reasoned and evocative examination of the contests over the next chapter of capitalism that will decide the meaning of information civilization in the 21st century. The stark issue at hand is whether we will be the masters of information and machines or its slaves. 

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

©2019 Shoshana Zuboff (P)2019 Hachette Audio

Critiques

"I will make a guarantee: Assuming we survive to tell the tale, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism has a high probability of joining the likes Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations and Max Weber's Economy and Society as defining social-economics texts of modern times. It is not a 'quick read'; it is to be savored and re-read and discussed with colleagues and friends. No zippy one-liners from me, except to almost literally beg you to read/ingest this book." (Tom Peters, coauthor of In Search of Excellence)

"My mind is blown on every page by the depth of Shoshana's research, the breadth of her knowledge, the rigor of her intellect, and finally by the power of her arguments. I'm not sure we can end the age of surveillance capitalism without her help, and that's why I believe this is the most important book of our time." (Doc Searls, author of The Intention Economy, editor in chief, Linux Journal)

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Notations

Global

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Trier par :
  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
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  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

An essential read for everyone who owns a smartphone

With a level of certainty and clarity of a masterpiece, this book takes aim at the omnipresent surveillance capitalist that boldly claims our daily lives and liberty in pursuit of unlimited power and profits. Based on impressive theoretical groundwork, this book shows the philosophical urgency and practical ways of resisting this new breed of exploitative capitalist.

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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Brad
  • 08/02/2019

A MUST, NOT TO BE MISSED

Something wicked indeed has come this way, and is upon us now. Dubbed early on "The Information Age"; the appellation is woefully insufficient. For it is glaringly clear that we are well into the transition from occupying nation states (in which our social contracts as governed populations had long been between civil governments -- varied in kind, but with the one common feature of thriving entirely on human agency) to occupying corporate states. That is, it is not too soon to say we no longer populate nations but vast ruling corporations.

The singular, most curious and even frightening thing to consider is that to the degree we arrived at this predicament, we did so willingly. We did so under no other pressure than our own acquiescence. We did so not from ignorance of what was happening -- for this book is proof of that -- but from, if anything, a mass gaslighting. Thus, with all the facts before us, we chose the road called convenience rather than the road called liberty; and that, as the poet once wrote, made all the difference.

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  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • pk
  • 04/04/2019

The intersection of ethics, capitalism, and tech

First, I love to read about ethics issues in technology; so, it may not be immediately apparent that one would be getting a good dose within this title. I was enamored from the beginning of how colorful this author was in producing a tangible and practical view of surveillance capitalism. This is a concept I've heard very little about outside of the security sector. To have the correlation made with other sociological concepts that I hadn't really thought about stretched me! This book was fantastic at opening up and investigating the implications of surveillance with the majority of consumers not truly comprehending and understanding the cost.

Now, I would be remiss if I didn't also mention that the author goes on, repeatedly and at length, to address the same points multiple times. It was really hard to extract the take-away points at the mid-point of this book because of how often the author hits the same points, using the same language, and the same frustration toward the abuses. If you are not a reader that likes to "work" to obtain the gold nuggets of wisdom, then this is not the book for you. At times, I found myself cursing in traffic because the author repeats herself too much. I have the impression that this author created this book intending that each chapter should be able to stand on it's own. The unifying themes are very evident; so, repeatedly hitting the drum of disdain became painful after the first 8hrs. The editor should have reigned it in!

The last point I should make is that there are probably more than 30 important topics for consideration in this book. All of them are worthy of your clock cycles to consider, understand, and discuss with your friends and family. When coupled with some of the other topics I like to read, such as artificial intelligence, I am at no shortage of discussion points to appreciate with a mint julep, a cigar, and a friend on the porch for at least 2 summers....but, I'll do it without my phone, or sensors of any type, nearby.

10 sur 10 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Amy B.
  • 22/04/2019

Good information - way too verbose

This book has so much good information, but it really needs a good editor. There was way too much repetition and the episodic flowery prose was distracting. This book is good, but it needs to be shorter and less of a burden to listen to.

7 sur 7 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Erik Kobayashi-solomon
  • 20/04/2019

Erudite and important

I had originally expected much more mechanical account of the way in which Google and Facebook, and later Microsoft, learned to use data to craft advertising messages. Instead, the book turned out to be a thoughtful and philosophical work that reminded me in ambition to Thomas Pikkety's work and in content to the writing of Hannah Arendt. This is an important work that I desperately hope will catch the attention of policy makers and prompt an international framework of privacy and personal rights laws.

4 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • KYLE KNOLL
  • 15/03/2019

Takes too much time to communicate simple points

I really tried hard hard to get into this book, but the author uses way too many words to communicate somewhat simple points. If you are looking to kill some time and like hearing an author ramble on using as many big words as possible, then this book is for you. I couldn't take it anymore and returned it.

9 sur 11 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
  • South Florida MBA
  • 14/07/2019

Book Editors failed to trim the word count

A great topic, with a author that can explain it well ....making a convincing argument for regulation of corporate and goverment use of citizens personal data. However, the book editors were asleep at the wheel esecially in the second half of the book where the editors must have just thrown in the towel and moved on to the next book ..... I can not imagine how excesssively wordy this book was before the final edit?? ..... this is a 6 hour story .... that wanders aimlessely between excess and irrelevant details while trying to make a very concise point.

It reads like the book was written by an author who has spent a career in academia and government, written like she felt that she was preaching from a pulpit of what she believes will be the legistlative bible on consumer data of the modern economy ..... she even invents some of her own proprietary phrases ....with little regard for reader's time, not many business readers will finish this 24 hour sermon ..... 18 hours of dramatic soap box preaching and excess detail around its 6 hours of unbiased actionable information.

By the end of book you will want to strangle Shoshana each time you hear the narrator drone on with:

1. ubiquitous
2. modernity
3. instrumentarian
4. conceptual
5. who decides-who decides
6. unprecendented
7. dispossession
8. personal autonomy
9. inalienable right to the future tense
10. survelliance capitalists
11. neoliberal
12. collectivist orientation
13. facsist
14. any and all
15. human freedom
16. hierarchical complexities
17. radical indifference
18 organism among organisms
19. radical indifference
20. data surplus
21. existential
22. equivalance without equality

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Joshua C.
  • 14/06/2019

lacking in content

overly alarmist with little substantiative content. the author has a poor understanding of machine learning and ai's actual applications in the field of surveillance and offers little to substantiate what she alleges to be a dramatic shift in the world's economic zeitgeist. barely any discussion on the technological underpinnings were offered, nor any actual, real life illustrations or examples. instead, the book offers a full-blown serving of conspiracy theorising in lieu of any serious treatment of the subject matter.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • JB
  • 01/06/2019

disappointed and gave up. Word Salad

While the topic was of great interest, I gave up after a while. What came to mind was “Word Salad”. just felt like the vocabulary was the focus, not presenting clear ideas and concepts. seemed like a doctoral paper, and after a while it just wasn’t worth listening further.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • marwalk
  • 31/05/2019

This book will boil your blood

Supported by extensive empirical research, Professor Shoshana Zuboff exposes the effective digital implementation of the late B. F. Skinner's Beyond Freedom and Dignity. It centers around three related factors: The distribution of knowledge: “Who knows?” Authority: “Who decides who knows?” and Power: “Who decides who decides who knows?” (Hint: it's not you). Orders of magnitude beyond just tracking cookies and the creepy anticipation of your interests by entities such as Google and Facebook, the new instrumentarianism is used by surveillance capitalists to control not just what you buy but also what you think about and how you think it.

This is not even the theoretical Capitalism of Friedman, Hayek, or Adam Smith, as there is no equality of individual choice in it. In other words there's no free market here, as surveillance capitalists deliberately orchestrate your life for their benefit irrespective of yours. Thus it's not a fair trade; there is no reciprocity in the conveniences you think you receive from even the simplest transactions.

You are not their customers (or even the "product" as in the cliché); their customers are the people purchasing the information harvested about you, which is extracted without your awareness. In this digital realm, it is as if you are the third world country having your natural resources extracted for the exclusive profits of foreign capitalists. Another clear analogy is we are like chickens being farmed for our eggs: they feed us with incentives, not for our well-being but so that we will lay more eggs to go into omelets not for us. You and your personal information are only the objects, the "Other," that are for sale for the benefit of people who are not you.

The key feature of all of this is that willingness is irrelevant, as we are unknowing and thus unwitting participants. Their salient objective is the obscene profits garnered from not just your profiles and posts, but the shadow text that you don't see from the fusion of the backscatter data about you that is harvested into separate secret databases. They actively hide that they have this information on you, as their modus operandi requires that you not be aware of it for this process to be successful.

Much of this activity is beyond the reach of laws and courts, as the surveillance capitalists would just go underground with their operations if regulations were imposed. It is accompanied by an acceleration of the deliberate assault on democracy through lobbying and revolving door employment between government and the commercial interests that control it. Thus just voting for politicians that promise to tame surveillance capitalism will be of insufficient effect.

Zuboff offers hope and some thoughts on what to do about it. European history has shown that when the people have had enough of oppression, they join together to rebel, as when the Berlin Wall came down without resistance from the guards. A similar event must occur today to escape the glass walls of the hive surveillance capitalists have put us in for the purpose of harvesting and orchestrating even our most personal thoughts, all for their profit and not ours. We need walls of our own, not to keep us in their hive, but to keep them out of our personal sanctuary.

Public opinion is key to taming this monster. In the end if enough of the public rose up against surveillance capitalism, possibly by throwing its shadow text in disarray and diminishing its value, the money and influence behind it would then be of little effect. There is hope if humans would willingly help each other to the extent that surveillance capitalists take without asking. Then the world would be a much friendlier and more prosperous place for everyone. and not just the few.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    1 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Al
  • 28/05/2019

Horrendously Rhetorical

The basic ideas in this are interesting, but the author writes with such thick rhetoric from a specific ideological position that she makes those ideas unnecessarily overcomplicated. It comes across as an author writing more for herself and glorification of her own intellectualism than as someone attempting to communicate an idea. Terrible.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.