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  • Your Inner Fish

  • A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body
  • De : Neil Shubin
  • Lu par : Marc Cashman
  • Durée : 6 h et 59 min
  • 5,0 out of 5 stars (3 notations)

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    Description

    Why do we look the way we do? What does the human hand have in common with the wing of a fly? Are breasts, sweat glands, and scales connected in some way? To better understand the inner workings of our bodies and to trace the origins of many of today’s most common diseases, we have to turn to unexpected sources: worms, flies, and even fish. 

    Neil Shubin, a leading paleontologist and professor of anatomy who discovered Tiktaalik - the “missing link” that made headlines around the world in April 2006 - tells the story of evolution by tracing the organs of the human body back millions of years, long before the first creatures walked the earth. By examining fossils and DNA, Shubin shows us that our hands actually resemble fish fins, our head is organized like that of a long-extinct jawless fish, and major parts of our genome look and function like those of worms and bacteria. 

    Shubin makes us see ourselves and our world in a completely new light. 

    Your Inner Fish is science writing at its finest - enlightening, accessible, and told with irresistible enthusiasm. 

    ©2008 Neil Shubin (P)2008 Books on Tape

    Commentaires

    “A delightful introduction to our skeletal structure, viscera and other vital parts - and evidence that learning the secrets of the human body need not unhinge you. ...[Shubin] is a warm and disarming guide....Future researchers, aware that the ingredients of our evolutionary precursors are part of the human recipe, may well find new ways to prevent the wear and tear on our fish-begotten bodies. And who knows? Maybe one or two of them will have had their first taste of the marvels of human evolution in Neil Shubin’s anatomy class.” (Los Angeles Times)

    “The antievolution crowd is always asking where the missing links in the descent of man are. Well, paleontologist Shubin actually discovered one....A crackerjack comparative anatomist, he uses his find to launch a voyage of discovery about the evolutionary evidence we can readily see at hand....Shubin relays all this exciting evidence and reasoning so clearly that no general-interest library should be without this book.” (Booklist, starred review)  

    “With infectious enthusiasm, unfailing clarity, and laugh-out-loud humor, Neil Shubin has created a book on paleontology, genetics, genomics, and anatomy that is almost impossible to put down. In telling the story of why we are who we are, Shubin does more than show us our inner fish; he awakens and excites the inner scientist in us all.” (Pauline Chen, author of Final Exam

    Ce que les auditeurs disent de Your Inner Fish

    Moyenne des évaluations utilisateurs. Seuls les utilisateurs ayant écouté le titre peuvent laisser une évaluation.
    Global
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    Commentaires - Veuillez sélectionner les onglets ci-dessous pour changer la provenance des commentaires.

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    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Mel
    • 03/02/2008

    Your Inner Fish

    Mr. Shubin's humanity comes through very vividly in this book. I found myself sharing his almost child like excitement of scientific discovery. The human failures he makes in his journey to acquire the skills necessary to do his research efficiently and professionally is also revealed.
    Any person interested in science needs to include this book in their collection. The scientific method is very evident here. Propose a hypothesis from already known information, define the structure of an experiment, and execute the experiment. Consequently, Tiktaalik is discovered. Tiktaalik fills in one more missing link in the theory of evolution.
    Mr. Shubin combines a number of scientific disciplines to support his conclusions. His knowledge of anatomy is amazing. I found it a fun read.

    14 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Aryn
    • 07/07/2008

    Be entertained and educated

    Worthwhile! Great information, some of it above the average education level but not so pedantic as to be incomprehensible. Lots of information. Made me take a second look at the history of bodies. Good read.

    12 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Nathan
    • 16/02/2008

    great!

    -Awesome insight and evidence for evolution of human structures, organs, and molecular biology.
    -This book increased my understanding and awe of this living planet.

    -The narrator was great.

    12 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Twang
    • 23/01/2008

    A 'Must Listen'

    Superb. A grand overview meticulously illustrating connections that only intimate knowledge of many and disparate fields brings.

    12 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
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    • Deborah Layton
    • 25/12/2008

    Good Paleo Listen...but What About My Inner Fish

    I expected this book to delve into the implications of the evolution from water-dwelling to land-dwelling organisms and relate it more tightly to human anatomy--but that never really materialized. A good quick listen for paleo fans and the excitement of discovery but not so much here for human anatomists.

    10 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • E. Smakman
    • 25/08/2013

    How evolution does not lead to perfection...

    Your inner fish, what a great book this is!! Neil Shubin is a professor of paleontology, the study of old bones. He has a particular expertise in fish, that's the reason for the title.
    But he could have chosen any animal in the heritage line of mankind to make his point, as long as it was sufficiently far in the past (say 300 million years).

    The gist of the book: evolution does not create entirely new beings that better fit the environment, but rather, repurposes creatures for a changing environment. Evolution in this sense can be compared to a house which has been renovated many times, in which bedrooms become bathrooms but still retain the old plumbing. Doors are used as windows and floors might get strengthened over time, but the basic layout cannot change much. This has benefits (build on what works in the past), but also drawbacks. The main one being that you cannot start anew and throw away unnecessary complexity. Humans are very complex, but some of it is just a burden. For example, the way our nerves twist and turn through the human body is the result of nerve-ends (sensory, muscular or organs) that were in a different place in our ancient ancestor beings. With a more direct route from brain to nerve-ending.

    Shubin explains how certain parts of our body have developed through the main evolutionary steps. Our bone structure, or eyes and ears, our brains itself. And proofs that indeed, we have a fish inside us.

    Just an idea of the kind of evolutionary routes which the book describes:
    - the first hard body parts that developed were teeth. And the first skull is nothing more than a lot of teeth. Re-use what you have and what works
    - ancient meat eaters (sharks) have wide jaws, levered through extra bones in the jaw. These extra bones have mutated over time to the ear, in which certain elements have 2 and humans have 3 bones (hammer, anvil, and another one). The animals with 2 ear bones have an extra jaw bone. In this way, all (I guess) skeletal creatures have a similar basic structure. Same with eyes, where the basic sensor is identical for all 'seeing' creatures.
    This is how evolution re-uses elements of what worked before.

    Shubin is also a good storyteller, so the book is not a dry telling of the facts. I will definitely try Shubin's other book which goes back even further in time.

    9 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
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    • Joshua Kim
    • 10/06/2012

    Your Outer Reader

    Shubin connects our deep evolutionary history with our current anatomy and structure. I really enjoyed learning about paleontology, how fossil research works (and why it is so important) and the emerging integration of genetic with fossil research.

    In his next book I hope Shubin spends more time drawing larger connections between his field and the larger project of evolutionary biology and evolutionary psychology. It would be great to bring his deep evolution story about our earliest development into the world of behavior.

    Shubin is a good writer and an accomplished scientist. Highly recommended.

    9 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
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    • K. Finnefrock
    • 16/03/2008

    Seemed like Evolution for Dummies

    I was really disapointed by this book. It has an interesting premise, but is really much too simple. There isn't much of any new information in it for anyone who has ever read an article or seen a documentary on evolution. It was just very simplistic and boring despite the good intro.

    8 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
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      4 out of 5 stars
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    • Tony Nastase
    • 28/03/2015

    Informative, interesting, not 100% entertaining

    The book was certainly informative, though it lacked the profundity or narrative of some other non-fiction works (ie. the Selfish Gene, Viral Storm). I certainly learned a lot anatomically, but I never truly felt "hooked." Nonetheless, I would recommend this to anyone new to (or even well-versed in) evolutionary biology. It was certainly worth the listen.

    Recommended further reading - Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human

    5 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • megan
    • 19/05/2016

    great read!

    this is an excellent book for science majors, especially biology majors. This was recommended by my professors

    3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • citrusspiegel
    • 25/06/2015

    Amazing!

    As an evolutionary biologist with a focus on paleontology I thought this program was gonna be a fun thing to listen to while doing countless hours of busy work on the computer. But it completely fascinated me to hear the story of our lives and our fishy ancestors told by Prof. Shubin. I had to laugh several times and was again mesmerized by evolution. Thanks a lot! Can absolutely recommend - not only to laymen!