Votre titre Audible gratuit

9,95 € / mois après 30 jours. Résiliable à tout moment.

ou
Dans le panier

Vous êtes membre Amazon Prime ?

Bénéficiez automatiquement de 2 livres audio offerts.
Bonne écoute !

    Description

    The Phoenix Project wowed over a half-million readers. Now comes The Unicorn Project! 

    “The Unicorn Project is amazing, and I loved it 100 times more than The Phoenix Project…” (Fernando Cornago, senior director platform engineering, Adidas)

    “Gene Kim does a masterful job of showing how … the efforts of many create lasting business advantages for all.” (Dr. Steven Spear, author of The High-Velocity Edge, sr. lecturer at MIT, and principal of HVE LLC)

    “The Unicorn Project is so clever, so good, so crazy enlightening!” (Cornelia Davis, vice president of technology at Pivotal Software, Inc., author of Cloud Native Patterns)

    This highly anticipated follow-up to the best-selling title The Phoenix Project takes another look at Parts Unlimited, this time from the perspective of software development. 

    In The Unicorn Project, we follow Maxine, a senior lead developer and architect, as she is exiled to the Phoenix Project, to the horror of her friends and colleagues, as punishment for contributing to a payroll outage. She tries to survive in what feels like a heartless and uncaring bureaucracy and to work within a system where no one can get anything done without endless committees, paperwork, and approvals. 

    One day, she is approached by a ragtag bunch of misfits who say they want to overthrow the existing order, to liberate developers, to bring joy back to technology work, and to enable the business to win in a time of digital disruption. To her surprise, she finds herself drawn ever further into this movement, eventually becoming one of the leaders of the Rebellion, which puts her in the crosshairs of some familiar and very dangerous enemies. 

    The Age of Software is here, and another mass extinction event looms - this is a story about rebel developers and business leaders working together, racing against time to innovate, survive, and thrive in a time of unprecedented uncertainty...and opportunity.  

    ©2019 Gene Kim (P)2019 Gene Kim

    Ce que les auditeurs disent de The Unicorn Project

    Notations
    Global
    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • 5 étoiles
      13
    • 4 étoiles
      0
    • 3 étoiles
      1
    • 2 étoiles
      0
    • 1 étoile
      0
    Interprétation
    • 4.5 out of 5 stars
    • 5 étoiles
      11
    • 4 étoiles
      1
    • 3 étoiles
      0
    • 2 étoiles
      1
    • 1 étoile
      0
    Histoire
    • 5 out of 5 stars
    • 5 étoiles
      12
    • 4 étoiles
      0
    • 3 étoiles
      1
    • 2 étoiles
      0
    • 1 étoile
      0

    Commentaires - Veuillez sélectionner les onglets ci-dessous pour changer la provenance des commentaires.

    Trier par :
    Trier par:
    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars

    Great inspiring business and software novel

    Congrats to the author Gene Kim for yet another very cool book around the importance of software and humans done right.
    Kudos to the narrator, pronouncing things like NoSQL the expected way really helps staying immersed in the story for us software professionals.

    Trier par :
    Trier par:
    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      2 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      1 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour SaintHax
    • SaintHax
    • 10/01/2020

    This is no Phoenix Project

    There are many things wrong with this audio book, the least of which is badly pieced in audio pieces from different recordings. The worst offender, is the unrelatable Mary Sue of a main character. Unlike our hero in the Phoenix Project, who had to learn what needs to be done (like the classic "hero journey" plot), Maxine just needs opportunity and a general nudge in the right direction. Eric still pops up as a mysterious Yoda like mentor, but he also is unrelatable. He has went from odd to cartoony. Maxine is sidelined for something she didn't do (she doesn't make mistakes like our beloved Brent), has disassembled vendor DB drivers and patched them all in one night, she is known for her patience, and unlike anyone I know-- loves and is amazed by every other team in the company that interacts with her. Oh, and no work/life balance issues like Bill, and she even has a puppy to play with (of course she does). Our villain, Sarah, even invites her out to lunch after Maxine snubs her, b/c of them being the same gender (the Sr. VP literally says, "Us girls have to stick together" in a meeting of mixed company). I wish Maxine and her whole perfect entourage was our only problem.

    In addition to that, where TPP. the characters and problems were so relatable that people were writing the authors to see if they were writing about their company, here the problems are very hit and miss. Worse again, where TPP concentrated on the 3 Ways and 4 types of work, the TUP is less defined. Eric mentions 4 horizons and something else-- which I've forgotten. Something about being happy at work *shrug*. Maxine is a evangelist for functional programming and immutable data, and there are many other little things that get very lost in the book. In addition, either the author or John Willis said there's no learning without mistakes-- Maxine makes no mistakes. She needs some course correction, but never goes down the wrong path. That's another difference between her and Bill. B/c of that, the lessons aren't driven home. This makes it a 12 hour book, that would have been better as a 1.5 hour TED Talk.

    The book will have great reviews b/c Gene Kim helped produced TPP and is a master in DevOps; however, objectively this is a huge miss. Anyone considering this that hasn't listened to his "Beyond the Phoenix Project" should get it instead.

    37 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      1 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour SA
    • SA
    • 03/01/2020

    one star

    This was so boring. there never was any interesting conflict to move the story forward.

    11 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      3 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Mr Vegas
    • Mr Vegas
    • 06/12/2019

    This book is just ok. You are much better with The Phoenix Project

    Let me start by saying the authors prior work The Phoenix Project is the best book ever written on Devops. This book really doesn’t match up. Simple put if you listen to the Phoenix Project you can ignore this book. What is unfortunately missing is more mr miyagi recommendations and frameworks that folks can leverage. There are just brief glimpses of it from The board member / bar owner Erik but overall it’s nothing profound. Unlike the last book where there are so many transformations with Bill and John. Sorry Gene this was the most anticipated book I had and I think you let us down.

    10 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Amazon Customer
    • Amazon Customer
    • 19/12/2019

    Inspiring book – fun, flow and Joy. Another master

    Three principles, four types of work and now five ideals. For me, it is 5 star, no doubt it is “Best Seller.”

     

    If you are frustrated developer/engineer (due to typical Enterprise issues, access policies, tickets to gain access, poor documentation, long processes), please read #TheUnicornProject by @RealGeneKim, @ITRevBooks

     

    Gene Kim has clearly described our emotions, frustrations, and thinking. The engineers – developers/testers attempt to help, not to give up on our failures.  We all live in that character “Maxine”, and she lives in our day-day life.

    The book talks about the workplace to be better, helps & improves developer productivity so that engineers could write better quality Software, sooner, safer.

    Happy developers do more, give more, help more; help the organisation to move forward.

    Every one of us wants our organisation to be successful, to be a better workplace, attract & retain talents; we want to work together not against each other. #TheUnicornProject portraits very nicely: Information not available readily, difficult to gain access, more issues, more tickets. The rebellion team is helping on their best effort to work together to move forward.

    Maxine couldn't get the Phoenix to build locally, missing 100 of things, 2weeks away from a production deployment. How many of us are we there in that situation? How many of we are brave enough to raise the issues, give the visibility of the problem? Maxine character is very inspiring, a senior developer, solving challenging issues (Threading, race conditions, performance) and the same time working to improve the productivity – having Continuous Integration, build, automated testing.

    If you want something to get done, you need a ticket - LB, Network, Monitoring, Integration,..n. The book narration might resonate well with so many. I am introducing the term - We know "TDD" test-driven development, have you heard of "TBD" Ticket Based Development?? Maxine’s frustrations with these and her curiosity to find more – understanding the why part and showing empathy – reminds us that we care for our fello team members, extended team members – listen.

     

    Best part:

    Bringing the books together discussed in – The Phoenix Project and The Unicorn Project – with familiar characters, problems.

    Describing the leadership team, engineering team and their characters

    The moments related – like hunting the documentation, access to the systems, code build, production outage, code merge exercise, functional programming, code mentoring at school, testing day

     

    Read, listen, share – work together. This book is an excellent addition to every IT person personal or work or book club library. You will enjoy every bit of it.

    BTW, new audible version as I am writing this review.

    4 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Shaun M.
    • Shaun M.
    • 31/12/2019

    A great addition to the phoenix project

    A great addition to the phoenix project. I wouldn't read this until you have read the phoenix project

    3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Anonymous User
    • Anonymous User
    • 29/11/2019

    Terrible performance distracts from the story

    The audio recording contains randomly spliced in sections that appear to have been added later on, it is extremely distracting and really throws you out of the story.

    For such a highly anticipated book the lack of care that went into this recording is simply astonishing.

    7 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Amazon Customer
    • Amazon Customer
    • 02/12/2019

    Audio was horrible

    The splicing of redo’s was bad, distractingly bad. Seems like they rushed it. I like the story, but not a quality audiobook.

    9 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      2 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      2 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      1 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Brett Woodward
    • Brett Woodward
    • 05/03/2020

    What a struggle

    it was recommended, but I struggled to get half way through it. The story felt like it was written at an 8th grade level.

    Aspects of the story made me cringe. Now, it it's too late to return it.

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      2 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Stephan
    • Stephan
    • 11/05/2021

    Not as relatable as TPP

    While it was interesting to see The Phoenix Project from the 'other side', overall I felt this book brought less value; there was less discovery. In TPP, I felt I was on the journey with Bill and that he wasn't too technical or advanced in his career (starting as just a lower level manager), so he was very relatable.

    In The Unicorn Project, we're following Maxine, a well seasoned and distinguished developer (there's a whole paragraph on her accomplishments) who seems to already have all the answers (and able to solve a race condition in minutes). I wasn't on a journey of discovery, but more a "Wow parts unlimited sucks. Let's see how they manage to circumvent poor management".

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      2 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      3 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour J
    • J
    • 12/01/2020

    Great follow up to the Phoenix Project

    ideal book for devops and business.
    1) Business will learn there is untapped potential in every market by using software.
    2) Leadership and business can learn that software engineers have a lot to offer and benefit from the same motivation as any employee such as respect, not being overworked, training and career growth.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    Trier par :
    Trier par:
    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      2 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      3 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour M
    • M
    • 21/01/2020

    An underwhelming second entry that feels rushed

    I wanted to like this audio book. Really. But Gene Kim didn't make it easy, and Frankie Corzo made it hard.

    First, for the book itself.
    If you have read The Phoenix Project or The Goal, you pretty much know the plot to this book. Something in a firm goes horribly wrong and our protagonist (in this case Maxine) is in the middle of it and now has to deal with the fallout. She will overcome obstacles with her cunning, optimism and the help of a mysterious mentor, who mostly speaks in riddles that self-explain themselves throughout the story.
    So far, so good.
    The problem is that Gene Kim is obviously no novelist. Now, I will be the first to admit that he knows way, way more than I about economics and how to run a business, and the ideas presented in this novel are wonderful and truly a great way forward, but I cannot help but feel that this book would have been way better as a simple textbook instead.
    As it is, I have to slog through hundreds of minutes of uninspired description, more monologues than dialogue and a dreadfully boring middle section where the initial high stakes of the beginning (and decent ending) are mere memories.
    The biggest problem this book has, in my opinion,is that Kim relies far too much on exposion through monologue. You will hear "As you all know..." at least 15 times throughout this book, followed by a character taking 3-10 minutes explaining a concept all the characters , well, um....know. This turns an otherwise interesting story into a pain to listen to, because they completely destroy your suspension of disbelief. The characters all wow and ohh and ah at each other, nodding along while being told simple truths about the company they have been working at for 10+ years.
    Most of these mistakes could have been remedied if there had been a good editor allowed proper access to the text, but seemingly, that was not the case. In the Phoenix Project, I could forgive these things because the narrator did a good job of bringing the somewhat clumsy story to life, and it was clear that it was Kim's first narrative. But in this book, that's no longer the case.

    Frankie Corzo reads it like a bed time story. No way around it. At the beginning, I felt like she tried to give the characters an Iota of life, but these attempts are quickly abandoned for "read it out" style of dialogue. More than that, there are hundreds(!) of passages where it is clear she had to re-record over her own mistakes (some of which are still in, mostly intonation but sometimes also a noticeable lisp). This results in a text where sometimes. Seemingly a new sentence starts in the middle. of an existing one. It confuses the heck out of me, and I wonder who let this go through quality control.

    And there it is, the thing that connects both problems: Quality control.
    For a book that puts so much stress on Customer Satisfaction and the importance of good QA, this book has provided neither. It feels incredibly rushed, like the Author and Narrator both had to meet some arbitrary deadline, delivering a book that would have needed at least another half a year to a year in order to be properly ready. With more time for editing and rewriting, and more time for Mz. Corso to find her reading legs (and maybe put some effort into breathing life into an arguably lifeless text), this could have been a great reading experience, instead of just an educational one.

    As it is, I can recommend this book for people who abhor textbooks and need something to wash down the medicine with, but hardly anyone else. You're far better off just reading The DevOps Handbook and the inevitable companion book to this novel.

    6 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Amazon Kunde
    • Amazon Kunde
    • 25/01/2021

    Over the top yet greate inspiration

    Sometimes the book dwells in technical details and is slighly over the top. Yet it might be exactly this contrast that gets you involced into the book and really inspieres you. I wounder how many rebelion have been founded since the book was published. It made me question some of our architectur at least.

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Utilisateur anonyme
    • Utilisateur anonyme
    • 12/01/2021

    nice book

    nice book but maybe too much jargon for someone outside the programming world. recommended anyway

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour rp40
    • rp40
    • 31/12/2020

    Mind Blowing!

    Für Entwickler eine super spannende Geschichte! Es gibt so viele Parallelen zur Wirklichkeit. Dieses Hörbuch ist ein toller Anreiz für alle in der Softwareentwicklung sich kritisch zu hinterfragen und zu schauen, was man selbst besser tun kann. Die Verbindung von Technik, Business UND Menschen in diesem Hörbuch ist großartig. So sollte es auch in der Wirklichkeit sein... aber vielleicht steckt in jedem von uns ein bisschen die Hauptdarstellerin.
    Vielen Dank für die großartige Geschichte. Sie war jede Minute meiner Zeit Wert!

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Jochen Issing
    • Jochen Issing
    • 02/05/2020

    Good read for everyone shipping software

    It covers pretty much everything related to shipping software from the perspective of an engineer. Some details sound a little weird and seem like gaps in good background checks, but overall it’s a very applicable story, especially for larger corporations.

    I can highly recommend this book!

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Taimoor
    • Taimoor
    • 15/03/2020

    mind blown!

    Gene is a great writer and combined tech and pop culture in a way I haven't seen before. I believe this audiobook is a must read for everyone in the tech industry.