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The Rise and Fall of Soviet Communism: A History of 20th-Century Russia

Lu par : Gary Hamburg
Durée : 12 h et 10 min
Catégories : Histoire, Europe
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Description

From the Oval Office to the streets of Moscow, world leaders and ordinary citizens alike share interest and concerns about Russia. Can democracy survive there? What does the future hold for the once expansive and still powerful Russian nation? Is Soviet Communism truly dead?

These are the kinds of questions diplomats struggle with every day. And now, through this series of 16 incisive lectures by an acclaimed scholar of Russian history, you can begin investigating them for yourself as you take a probing historical journey through the recent history and near future of a key world power. Whether your chief interest is Russian or world history, political theory, or international relations, you'll take away fresh knowledge and insight as Professor Hamburg examines the improbable origins of Communist rule in Russia, the ascent of the Red Star to its zenith, and its decline and apparent end in the wake of 1989's events.

Using new material from previously sealed Soviet archives and covering recent controversial findings by both Russian and Western scholars, he begins with the failures of the czarist regime and the horrors of the First World War, then takes you through the bloody era of Josef Stalin's purges and beyond to Mikhail Gorbachev's perestroika to offer you a thoroughgoing analysis of the Soviet experiment.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©1996 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)1996 The Great Courses

Ce que les auditeurs disent de The Rise and Fall of Soviet Communism: A History of 20th-Century Russia

Notations
Global
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  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
Image de profile pour Bob Savage
  • Bob Savage
  • 15/11/2014

Prof. Hamburg Randomly Picked Topics

Would you try another book from The Great Courses and/or Professor Gary Hamburg?

I may pick other Great Courses but I will be more careful to see when the actual date that the lectures were taped. Bill Clinton was still president of the United States and Yeltsin was President of Russia when these lectures were taped. Professor Hamburg was given his predictions on what would happen in Russia after the fall of Communism. More than 14 years have gone by since they lecture were taped and much has happen. As a result, the last lecture was very out of date and gave no preceptive what Russia has actually become under Putin. The "release date" stated 2013 but this is obviously meaningless because it has no relation to when the lectures was actually taped.

What could The Great Courses have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Discussed the date that the lectures were given.

What character would you cut from The Rise and Fall of Soviet Communism: A History of 20th-Century Russia?

N/A

Any additional comments?

It does not appear that the professor actually tried to explain why the USSR fell. He randomly picked topics to include but skipped crucial events. He did not include Poland and East Germany's efforts and final success in breaking away from the USSR and the USSR's decision not to send in troops to stop them from breaking away as a prellude to the USSR republics also seeking to break with it. He did not even discuss the USSR's defeat in Afghanistan as a factor in the eventual breakup of the USSR. Not really a good effort.

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  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Karen
  • 28/03/2018

What happened to Brezhnev!?!?!

The 20 or so years that Brezhnev was in power accounts for about 27% of soviet history and almost half the Cold War but he scarcely got 15 minutes of the total lecture! If you blinked you would have missed him!

5 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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  • Prof. Michael Anthony Novak
  • 25/09/2016

Good, but a little incomplete

Professor Hamburg's work is engaging, in conversation with the scholarship around him, and is a fine example of the historian's task. This latter is by virtue both of his willingness to offer insightful assessments where he can, and by being modest where information is lacking. There are two drawbacks. The lectures, recorded and published around 1997/1998, are now (September 2016) feeling a little dated in not continuing on to the Putin years, which are a continuation of the aftermath of the Soviet story. The other drawback is the feeling of disproportion in the series. Out of sixteen lectures, twelve are devoted to the period of the Revolution through the end of Stalin's reign in 1953. That leaves three lectures for the post-1953 Soviet Union, and one for the post-Soviet era, thus four lectures covering 43 years, after having had twelve lectures covering a comparable stretch of time. The Cold War is therefore treated hastily, more attention to internal Soviet life in the later period would be welcome, and details of the complex Soviet relationship to Europe are lacking. (For example, there is no mention of the Solidarity movement or the rise of John Paul II in Poland.) If the Teaching Company can give Dr. Hamburg the opportunity to add to and revise the latter part of these lectures, that would be an easy and welcome fix.

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  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Lance
  • 13/11/2013

Great introduction but leaves lots of questions

I really enjoyed the professor and the course. It is a very historical overview of the forces that drove acceptance of Soviet communism, an overview of its decline, and some background behind where it may be headed.

Highly recommended as an introduction to this material.

Reasons why I dropped a star. I didn't get a sense as to what the people did, who the people were, who the people became as they progressed throughout what was about a 100 year window of Russian history. I get that Communism minimizes individual contributions and thus this is not necessarily noteworthy, but I would have liked to see a more systematic analysis of how the culture of the country changed as the years progressed. Another reason is the course seemed to stop somewhere in the 1990s. Ok, great but I feel like I need to read alot more about Yeltsin and Putin to understand where Russia is today and what its prospects are. The professor I think could have accommodated more discussion about the Russian people and culture but sometimes gets sidetracked on points that were interesting but somewhat academic. Great I know and get that he is a teacher but for an intro course, I'd rather be focused on some key themes and keep the the academic / pedantic stuff to a minimum.

Loved the course. Really liked the teacher. This is highly recommended for those looking for an introduction to the rise and fall of Soviet Communism. There may be better intros out there but this worked well for me.

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  • John
  • 18/02/2016

One of the best of the Great Courses

Thorough, exhaustive, and very analytical re Soviet history. My two degrees in History say: "Great"

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Matthew
  • 05/05/2015

Introductory to Early Uprising

It's a good primer for sure, wanting to know more about early communist uprising. This is a good start. I enjoyed it.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Bader
  • 30/07/2020

Couldn’t Ask for a Better Course

What a course! Absolutely terrific professor who is knowledgeable and understand the languages and cultures of the USSR. Riveting lectures. 10/10

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  • philippe jacob
  • 03/07/2020

Usual Cold War story

It is interesting to hear this same old story, but nothing new here. 30 years after the disappearance of the USSR there does not seem to be any attempt to explain how this could have happened. The criticism of who we are now is not even perceived. Sometimes the lecturer is being cynical and doesn’t seem to have any empathy for the communists as if they were not humans. When he mentioned that the bread that the people of the Soviet Union had to eat during WWII, would contain saw dust, I almost expected him to say that they could have eaten cake instead. It was almost as if Marie Antoinette was telling us about the history of humanity.

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  • Tommy D'Angelo
  • 20/06/2020

Painful

I had high hopes for this course because it dedicated a good amount of time (12 plus hours) to a short period of historical time (20th Century). This laser-focus attention usually signifies a great opportunity to learn a lot of new things about the subject at hand and not just review the major events we are already familiar with during the condensed time period. Unfortunately, at course's end I can't say I can really recall learning anything new that isn't present in the various other courses from TGC centering around Russia and the time period in general. In fact there were events that inexplicably weren't even touched on at all such as the Berlin airlift and the Cuban Missile Crisis. The Cold War barely had a few moments time dedicated to it. My childhood coincided with the tail end of the Cold War and I remember how large of a shadow it cast on the lives of every person in everyday life. How can a course on the USSR not cover the Cold War in more depth? When you have 12 hours to discuss a short period of historical time why would you leave out some of the most defining events of the Cold War? I was excited to understand the Cold War from the Russian point of view but instead we got none of that. While I wasn't a big fan of the "A History of Russia - From Peter the Great to Gorbachev" course, you will learn more there in my opinion. And of course there are numerous other courses that cover Russia during the time period surveyed that I would highly recommend: 1- War, Peace, and Power: Diplomatic History of Europe, 1500-2000 2- Foundations of Western Civilization II: A History of the Modern Western World 3- Europe and Western Civilization in the Modern Age 4- World War I: The "Great War" 5- World War II: A Military and Social History 6- World War II: Battlefield Europe The professor's talking style made it difficult to get fully engrossed in the course. He speaks slow, sounds somewhat sleepy, and his statements/conclusions aren't exactly earth-shattering or at least thought-provoking. I hate to hold one's talking style against them because we all have our idiosyncrasies but the reality is I just couldn't get engaged. Another turn off was his constant sighing or laughing. The former gave the impression he was either tired or dreading how to take up the task of tackling the next subject and the latter (while meant as a way to reinforce how obviously terrible the communist state conducted themselves) was not appropriate for the topics he was discussing. The first time I can understand his frame of mind but the continuous habit was so out of place. Even if he wasn't trying to be dismissive of the topics at hand, the gravity of the atrocities didn't warrant such a constant reaction. If you are interested in Russian history and are debating which course to select from TGC catalog, I would recommend going with one of the other courses I referenced above.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Alex Ziegler
  • 05/05/2020

Presented seemed bored a good amount is the time

I’m fascinated about the topic, but Gary seemed bored with it at times. Good information and still worth a listen. Deserves an update with Putin and future Outlook.

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  • Utilisateur anonyme
  • 17/08/2017

Not quite up to date, but still good.

Over all a good lecture. Sadly it's from the middle of the 90s, so I guess it's not quite up to date.

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  • Dr.Ewald
  • 14/04/2018

Interesting topic but should be more objective

I am much more knowledgeable now, but the speaker seemed sometimes to be emotionally involved and create preemptive evaluations that did not sound altogether objective. On the bottom line, I liked it.