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The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection

or, The Preservation of Favored Races in the Struggle for Life
Lu par : Robin Field
Durée : 23 h et 9 min

Prix : 30,18 €

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Description

The Origin of Species sold out on the first day of its publication in 1859. It is the major book of the 19th century and one of the most readable and accessible of the great revolutionary works of the scientific imagination. Though, in fact, little read, most people know what it says—at least they think they do.

The Origin of Species was the first mature and persuasive work to explain how species change through the process of natural selection. Upon its publication, the book began to transform attitudes about society and religion and was soon used to justify the philosophies of communists, socialists, capitalists, and even Germany’s National Socialists. But the most quoted response came from Thomas Henry Huxley, Darwin’s friend and also a renowned naturalist, who exclaimed, “How extremely stupid not to have thought of that!"

Public Domain (P)2011 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Critiques

“One of the most important contributions ever made to philosophic science.” ( The New York Times)

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  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Ary Shalizi
  • 11/01/2012

For aficionados only.

I'm a molecular biologist by profession, so I thought it would be fun to listen to what is widely considered THE foundational work of modern biology. While interesting for me from a historical standpoint—it's truly breathtaking how complete a conceptual framework the Origin provided more than a century and a half ago, and how thoroughly Darwin anticipated and refuted the possible objections to his theory—unless you really want to hear all of the examples Mr. Darwin deploys to buttress his theory of natural selection, I would recommend a more recent treatment of the topic. Or listen through an abridged edition of The Origin of Species, such as the one narrated by Richard Dawkins. The language is, in most places, exceptionally dry, and the narrator doesn't do the material any favors. However, it is one of the great achievements of human reason, so if you are patient and able to pay close attention to the dense language, this will ultimately be worth your time.

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  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Riegholt
  • 24/04/2012

Best way to read the classic!

THE biology book, essential reading -but a but tedious. Having it read to me was perfect. The sound and extensive reasoning by Darwin really came to life.

The work is not only interesting for people interested in biology or evolution theory.

The way Darwin addresses objections that can (and still are) be raised, the way he points out difficulties and weak points in his theory and discusses those are an example of the way scientist ought to explain and defend their theories.

10 sur 10 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Kevin
  • 24/07/2014

A must read for anyone interested in lifes origins

Where does The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Near the top...probably in the top 5

Who was your favorite character and why?

Um, is this a trick question...there are no characters in On the Origin of Species, but many animals...I like birds I guess...

What does Robin Field bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He did alright.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I greatly enjoyed this book and wish I would've read it while in college.

Any additional comments?

After reading Darwin's "On the Origin of Species" I can see why its been noted as one of the most significant books ever written - especially when it comes to scientific literature and observation. I've come to realize that many of Darwin's ideas are over emphasized, underestimated, and way ahead of his time.

To my point on being over emphasized, I have heard many assumptions by many people that assume Darwin wrote this book in a way that pushed evolution to being the explanation for all of life's origins. Many of his ideas and observations are either taken out of context or argued in a way that makes it seem like Darwin had all the answers. If people who openly debated evolution actually read this work, they would come to understand that many of his ideas make perfect sense within the context of his observations. He also dedicates a full chapter to problems with his theory - many of which are some of the arguments still made today.

To my point on being underestimated, I think that when people have taken Darwin's ideas out of context they are missing a grander point in that natural selection is a means by which we can explain evolution and change through time. I think that many people also misunderstand Darwin's observations in that he was able to use empirical evidence to support his ideas, which can be easily overlooked by individuals that attack his theory as an "opinion" or theory without explanation.

To my point on Darwin being ahead of his time, I found it extremely interesting that he was able to make predictions about tectonic plates and the movement of the earth's continents that allowed for the geographical distribution of species 50-60 years before scientists began working off of the theory of plate tectonics. I think many of his other observations have since been confirmed regarding inheritance, now that we have the technology to craft phylogentic trees and such - even to the extent of using mitochondrial DNA and rRNA to track ancestry.

Altogether I found this book fascinating and look forward to reading it again. I'll also look forward to checking out his other writings at some point. Part of me wishes I would've read this book in college when I would've had more opportunities to explore his ideas as well as take advantage of professors that could have spoken at great lengths on the subject.

Pros: Truly a classic when it comes to scientific observations and how science should be performed.
Cons: The chapter on hybrids was a bit dry and hard to follow.
Bottom line: Excellent read for anyone interested in life's origins or how there is commonality among life forms.

6 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Jeff Harris
  • 19/04/2013

Finally Got Around To It!

Being fascinated by evolution and actively studying it, Darwin's On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection is simply a must-listen. Remind yourself of the time at which Darwin published this book and it becomes even more astounding. I would not recommend this book for anyone who is curious about evolution and natural selection as this can get very dry, very quickly. I would try an abridged version if you don't want to hear every little detail about the book.

The narrator left a lot to be desired and seemed to have to force his way through the book and did not at least sound like there was an interest on his part in the subject matter.

3 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Richard
  • 26/12/2011

Not exactly easy listening

I'm sure this historically groundbreaking work is essential listening for people studying the subject, but as an interested layperson I should have gone with a more recent work studying the work of Darwin and its impact on our understanding of evolution.
This work is quite a repetitive overview of his research which though interesting, was not exactly easy to listen to and I found my attention wandering during the narration.

5 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Robert English
  • 11/02/2016

Excellent Narration, Hard to Follow Along

I got this book to get through my readings for a science class faster. It worked beautifully, except when I tried to follow along. My guess, though I haven't confirmed this with another print version of origin of species is that the footnotes are included in this audiobook. The choic to include them in the audio added a lot of detail, and made it a great listen, but not so great to follow along.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • alexis
  • 25/09/2015

One of the most important books!

this is probably one of the most important books you'll ever have to read, or listen to. Darwin is extremely smart, eloquent, very detailed, shows facts as well as addressing the opposition. this is stuff everyone should know. this book is heavy, very hard to stay attentive completely, will need a second or third listen for sure

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • John Michael Trowbridge
  • 08/09/2015

Classic

great book, especially if you enjoy biology. because it's been so influential, it should be read by everyone.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • R. A. Steele
  • 07/02/2019

Dedication to the task at hand

The sheer volume of data recording that was necessary to document the evidence for his theory is mind boggling. And yet it is here in the book, laid out for anyone to see. His theory lead directly to genetic science as we know it today. A fascinating if extremely dry book.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Paula
  • 04/11/2018

Pleasant Listen

This book is charming, informative and historically formative. It's amazing how much Darwin understood about heredity without understanding DNA. I can understand how darker philosophies could be derived from his work and used to justify the destruction of Native American people, and the WW2 holocaust, but I'm not certain if Darwin intended this-he seems to be more science geeky than intentionally political or philosophical. I liked that he uses a Rogerian argument style rather than an atagonistic one.