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The Long Shadow of the Ancient Greek World

Lu par : Ian Worthington
Durée : 25 h
Prix : 50,79 €
9,95 € / mois après 30 jours. Résiliable à tout moment.

Description

Immerse yourself in this comprehensive survey of ancient Greece from 750 to 323 B.C. - from the emergence of Greece at the end of the Dark Ages to the final disintegration of Greek autonomy through the Macedonian kings Philip II and Alexander the Great.

These 48 riveting lectures tell the story of ancient Greek institutions and the people who molded them during the Archaic and Classical periods.

Concentrating on the city-states of mainland Greece, with a special focus on Athens, Professor Worthington guides through some of history's most hard-fought struggles - from armed conflicts (such as the Persian Wars, the Peloponnesian War, and the campaigns of Alexander the Great) to political and social struggles (including the late 6th-century civil war in Athens that pitted nobles against the lower classes and eventually produced the first stirrings of democracy).

As you explore innovative Athenian approaches to democracy, law, and empire, you discover how these approaches served as the bedrock for ideas and practices that you live with every day. You also encounter a wealth of intriguing links to many of our own contemporary institutions and attitudes about democracy, law, and empire.

By the end of Professor Worthington's final captivating lecture, you discover that there was nothing inevitable about democracy, the Western concept of justice, or any of the other traditions and institutions that now play such central roles in the politics of the modern Western world. The story of how this tentative structure transformed into the firm foundation of our contemporary world is gripping, enlightening, and immensely rewarding.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©2009 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2009 The Great Courses

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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Reid Kotlas
  • 17/09/2013

Excellent. Compelling and informative.

What about Professor Ian Worthington’s performance did you like?

He is clearly excited and passionate about the subject, and this comes across both in his delivery and in his planning and preparation of the content.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Too many to list!

Any additional comments?

The other commenter should not be trusted, his review is completely inaccurate. I would say this is a matter of subject preference, but there is so little in it that corresponds to reality that I do not doubt he must have listened only to one or two lectures before giving up, likely having too little interest in the subject matter to begin with.

18 sur 18 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Daniel Silveyra Perez
  • 05/03/2015

Fantastic primer, can get a little dull at times

The instructor is great; clear, concise, entertaining and endearing. Two thumbs up.

The course itself provides a great deal of context - it tied together all the disparate facts about Greece in my head. The coverage is extensive, from essentially prehistoric Greece to the Hellenistic period after Alexander the Great.

I also enjoyed the point of view of the instructor: he was careful to state when he was offering a personal view vs. A consensus view.

I give the content 4/5 since there were several classes focused on the details of legal procedures which I found very dull.

Definitely would recommend this lecture series for anyone interested in ancient Greek history who is not already an expert.

6 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Mitchell85
  • 04/07/2016

Great Place to Start Your Journey Into Greek History

Professor Worthington does an amazing job painting the total picture of Ancient Greece, with a clear chronology from the Archaic period to the Hellenistic. His viewpoints stem primarily from Athens and have a lot of interpretation of the Athenian Constitution. He is very clear to point out his own viewpoints and how they differ from current perspectives. My absolute favorite is how much Professor Worthington HATES Pericles, which whom I also find quite over rated.

As for the negative review of this lecture. I'm not sure what they are talking about. My guess is they did not give Professor Worthington much of a chance past the first lecture or so.

3 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Tommy D'Angelo
  • 20/10/2017

Hard to Stay Engaged

I can't say this was a bad course but because it did not capture and retain my attention and I found myself counting the minutes and lectures down to the end it is hard for me to rate this above 2 stars.

While the focus of the course is on democracy, law, and imperialism, it would’ve been good if the beginnings of the first Greek civilizations were discussed: Minoan and Mycenaean. Again I understand his focus was on other topics but I found it disappointing that among 48 lectures more time couldn't have been found to spare on other cornerstones of Greek influence on the modern world including Greek philosophy, theater, and the Homeric poems.

The professor has a unique style. Alot of time it was like he was presenting the lectures like one big story by a campfire. I actually found that endearing. But there are other times when it feels like he is talking to a classroom of elementary school children like his propensity to ask simple questions such as "Why would he do that?" or "Where was he going?". His humor mostly feel flat with me. However, there's no disputing the professor knows his stuff and is very comfortable presenting.

He does a good job of achieving what he set out to do: recount ancient Greek history focusing on democracy, law, and imperialism from aprx. 750 B.C. to 323 B.C (emergence of Greece at the end of the Dark Ages and the final disintegration of Greek autonomy through the Macedonian kings Philip II and Alexander the Great). I just feel like there has to be better ancient Greek courses out there that encompass all aspects of that long shadow including theater, philosophy, etc and can do so in a more engaging manner.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • B. peltzer
  • 15/05/2015

Amazing

Such a wonderful and well executed course detailing all the important events and people in Greek history. This course is a must.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 23/02/2019

Amazing History, Distracting Delivery

The course started enjoyable enough for the first 10 lectures. I had high expectations after listening to Fagan's History of Ancient Rome with Great Courses. He was very transparent to the primary sources, provided a survey of modern scholarly consensus, and synthesized this material from his own perspective at a very high level. He helped remind the listener that history is complex, and that many historical theories or frameworks over-simplify events, even as they help us focus.

Worthington's approach is almost the opposite. While he does often cite the primary sources, I don't think he always makes it clear when he is imagining situations and hypotheticals or getting material from ancient writers or archaeology. He often forgoes scholarly consensus and leaves the listener with his own "heresies", as he calls them himself. And his "heresies" often sound like amateur psychoanalyses of long dead men, or even psychoanalyses of whole regions and peoples. I admire his historic imagination, but the implausibility of his hypothetical explanations and counterfactual reasoning leaves me wondering what historians actually agree on or believe about these events.
He spends a lot of time on petty debates, like who should be called "the Father of Democracy." He doesn't think multiple people can get credit, because children can't have more than one biological father (fallacy of equivocation). This tangent wasn't brief, and its not uncommon.
Or how about "the Persians would have been demoralized after their victory at Thermopylae because they knew they only won because they outnumbered the Greek's and found a passage to flank them."

It sounds like people also had a let-down experience going from Fagan's History of Rome to the other Greek survey course done by McInerney. Still, I wish I had just gone with that one, and will probably try it next.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Ryan B.
  • 12/07/2018

Absolutely outstanding

This professor makes Greek history come alive. I thought I would get bored with all the dates and personalities prior to starting this course, but that was not the case at all. Quite the opposite! Not all of the details may be to your taste, especially the extended level of detail with which he treats ancient Greek law — in that case, I would suggest listening to those sections at two times speed – that helps if you start to be uncomfortable with his endearing but somewhat awkward sense of humor as well.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • The Kindler
  • 01/01/2018

Amazing Adventure into Greece

This professor is different and wants you to think about the facts and what the books say. He hits the most significant events and what lead up to the them. The sections on Greek Laws was very in-depth and will explained. Overall, it was a great course.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Hannibal Barca
  • 15/09/2017

Masterfully done

Professor Worthington is an engaging instructor and gifted storyteller. This was incredible. So sorry he doesn't have any other courses...well...on to the Greek and Persian Wars

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Joe
  • 29/06/2017

very informative

I enjoyed the presentation, especially the further touching on Macedonian rule and the focus on law, imperialism and empire

Trier par :
  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • MK
  • 30/06/2016

The ancient greek world in detail

Ian Worthington approaches the ancient greek world with a lot of scepticism. Unlike some other authors he is quick to critisize and looks at the true origin of things such as democracy.

In contrast to other lectures I came out of it really understanding certain events and how things turned out the way they did. Fortunately he goes chronologically, presenting events such as wars and turmoil without losing focus. One of my highlights are the chapters about the spartans.

The lecture series was truly enjoyable and the only thing I dislike is that there is no other lecture series by Ian Worthington. He manages to make discussions about law interesting and relevant.

If you are interested in the ancient greek world and want to go deeper than a superfucial look then this is the right choice.

I will re-listen the series even just for enjoyment.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.