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The Agency: A History of the CIA

Lu par : Hugh Wilford
Durée : 11 h et 32 min
Catégories : Anglais - History, American
3 out of 5 stars (1 notation)

Prix : 31,38 €

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Description

There’s a fundamental tension buried within the heart of the CIA’s mission to protect the American people: between democratic accountability and the inherent need for secrecy. Ultimately, it’s US citizens who bear the responsibility of staying informed about what the CIA has done and continues to do.

In these 24 engrossing lectures, explore the roles the CIA has played in recent American history, from the eve of the Cold War against communism to the 21st-century War on Terror. You’ll delve into some of the most remarkable successes, including the sound intelligence CIA spy planes provided during the Cuban Missile Crisis and the admirable performance of the CIA throughout much of the Vietnam War, as well as historic failures, including the agency’s slowness spotting the rise of radical Islamism (including the September 11 attacks).

In many cases, the lectures lead you to consider important questions about the nature of the CIA and its role in shaping modern history. What makes particular regions of the world ripe for the CIA’s attention? How successful are techniques like drone strikes, rendition, and interrogation? How does the CIA compare with its depiction in much of popular culture?

Here, in Professor Wilford’s unbiased exploration of the CIA’s inner workings, is everything you need to come to your own conclusions about what “the Agency” might have done right, what it might have done wrong, and what it should do in the future.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2019 The Great Courses (P)2019 The Teaching Company, LLC

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Notations

Global

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Histoire

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  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
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  • Histoire
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Disappointing!

In this series of 24 lectures, Professor Hugh Wilford endeavours to present the history of the Central Intelligence Agency from its inception following World War II to the present.

Much emphasis is placed on the Agency’s covert operations, or more precisely about what has been made public in that field over the years. Sadly, little is said about the fundamental job of information gathering, the techniques used, the resources required, etc. Nothing is ever mentioned about the number of employees, how they are hired and trained, what the amplitude of the CIA’s budget is and how it has evolved. Thus, the listener feels that he is being served a summary of newspaper articles from the past decades rather than an analysis of the work accomplished.

Overall, this ‘course’ consequently is largely superficial and greatly disappointing.

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  • Global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
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  • Histoire
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Image de profile pour MissBouquet
  • MissBouquet
  • 26/05/2019

Axe to Grind

Wilford certainly has an agenda, but unlike Tim Weiner (Legacy of Ashes), Wilford didn’t do any of the research. Here are a few erroneous points: CIA would monitor people simply for traveling to Russia and Cuba, and then names people who were members of the ACP, but he doesn’t mention that. Wilford said that South Vietnam was overrun in the Tet Offensive, yet we know that the Viet Cong were tactically decimated, but created a strategic victory through information operations. The Tet victory has long been debunked, but it illustrated Wilford lack of source material. Wilford said the CIA was lasing targets in Afghanistan for air strikes in Operation Jawbreaker, however, if Wilford so much as read Jawbreaker, Gary Schoern, he would know that is illegal and the reason they were embedded with Special Forces. Wilford only really gives credit to President Carter for his ability to wield the CIA, which is a fresh viewpoint to be sure.

This series is beneath the Great Courses. Wilford’s depth doesn’t seem to extend beyond the summaries on Wikipedia. If you want to know about the CIA by someone with an axe to grind, read Weiner- at least he did his homework.

5 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • BF Palo Alto
  • 14/04/2019

Interesting history of Our Spies, modest bias

Very enjoyable review of the prehistory and history of the CIA. In general, the professor was unbiased. By the end, some of his anti-CIA views leaked through -- especially when he got into the Bush era. Overall, though, worth the listen.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • jerry
  • 02/05/2019

liberal version

not my favorite course. professor definitely tells the story from the left. very dissatisfied from this course

1 sur 9 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.