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    Description

    Between 1958 and 1962, 45 million Chinese people were worked, starved or beaten to death. Mao Zedong threw his country into a frenzy with the Great Leap Forward. It lead to one of the greatest catastrophes the world has ever known. Dikotter's extraordinary research within Chinese archives brings together for the first time what happened in the corridors of power with the everyday experiences of ordinary people. This groundbreaking account definitively recasts the history of the People's Republic of China.

    ©2010 Frank Dikotter (P)2012 W F Howes Ltd

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    Ce que les auditeurs disent de Mao's Great Famine

    Notations

    Commentaires - Veuillez sélectionner les onglets ci-dessous pour changer la provenance des commentaires.

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    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour deborah
    • deborah
    • 09/01/2012

    Seminal book on Mao's failures

    This audiobook will expose what most of us never knew: the People's Revolution hid a devastating loss of life through starvation and exhaustion. I also learned about the cult of personality and the role the Soviets played in this disaster. My only complaint was that the listing of data became tiresome, like steel tonnage exported, etc.

    The best part of the story if the narration by David Bauckham. Clearly a well trained speaker of Mandarin, his articulation and inflection was spot on, and I never tired of his voice. Excellent book overall.

    12 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
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      1 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Eric Fish
    • 27/06/2015

    Great book, terrible audio reading

    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    The narrator clearly has no background whatsoever in reading texts with Chinese words, and it seems he couldn't be bothered to learn even approximate pronunciations. I'm not a language snob, and by no means expect perfection in this regard, but the pronunciations were so bad that I often had no clue what he was talking about. For example, Guangzhou became "Gwang-zoo," Liu Shaoqi became "Liu Shao-kee." And those were just some of the ones I was able to figure out based on context. Virtually every name and place was pronounced incorrectly, and these incorrect pronunciations weren't even consistent. I could figure out most of the time what he meant to say by the context, but it was very annoying when I had no clue what place or person was being discussed because of the abysmal pronunciations. It undermines the value as a learning tool. Save your money and buy the print version.

    7 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      3 out of 5 stars
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    • Shu
    • 23/05/2016

    Linear

    I finished the book right after Gulag. Compared with Gulag, Mao's great famine is to linear with less profound dive into the country's darkness and nature.

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      2 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
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    • Frances Ann Clark
    • 06/11/2015

    Engaging history, bad pronunciation

    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    Parts of this recording may grate on the ears of anyone who speaks Chinese or has a firm idea of how Chinese names and places ought to be pronounced. At best, it's distracting, at worst it is hard to understand what names the narrator is attempting to pronounce. David Bauckham is otherwise a very competent and fluid narrator, which perhaps makes the Chinese pronunciation problems more noticeable.

    Who would you have cast as narrator instead of David Bauckham?

    Any narrator of similar competence, but who could pronounce the Chinese names and places mentioned in the text, would be a massive improvement.

    Any additional comments?

    There's plenty of available discussion about the importance of Dikotter's work in challenging Chinese orthodoxy regarding the Great Famine and Great Leap Forward. It's worth reading, as is the more thoughtful criticism of his arguments and methods in reaching his final figure of 45 million dead due to the famine.

    4 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
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      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Nica Lorber
    • Nica Lorber
    • 18/10/2016

    Too many stats

    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    I would add more first hand accounts to humanize the story. It's hard to relate to a list of endless statistics. After a while they loose their impact.

    Any additional comments?

    The subject of this book is fascinating, and the author did a lot of research to shed new light on this topic.

    However, the majority of the book listed endless statistics that became hard to relate to after a while. Given the human tragedy of the situation, the book felt less personal and more statistical. I think that it could have provided more impact if there were more narratives from first hand accounts.

    The quantity of statistics made me start to question them after a while, even though the epilogue explains in detail how these stats were derived.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Scott J. Jones MD
    • 15/06/2016

    Excellent but a bit over-cooked

    The author establishes a number of historically important points, and the anecdotes which are portrayed are graphic and impactful. But this all could have been accomplished with the same zeal and perspicacity in half the number of pages.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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    • maambeau
    • 11/02/2013

    Amazing story

    Would you consider the audio edition of Mao's Great Famine to be better than the print version?

    I haven't read the print version

    What did you like best about this story?

    The way the facts were laid out.

    Have you listened to any of David Bauckham’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    No.

    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    How to wreck a country

    Any additional comments?

    Makes me want to learn more about China, before and after crazy Mao.

    3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
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      3 out of 5 stars
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      4 out of 5 stars
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    • Patricia
    • 28/11/2020

    One of the Better Reads

    While this text is one of the better reads on the Great Leap Forward / Great Famine, much was expected from the narrator, who delivered on some points, but failed on others. The Chinese word -shui is pronounced Schway not Schwee. This is but one mispronunciation that will drive any Chinese speaker insane. But this is not the only Mandarin word that is repeatedly mispronounced. Why not make notes in the readings that show the phonetically correct pronunciation?

    Now for the content. Dikotter is well respected in the field of Asian Studies and his publications are very well researched. However, the Great Leap Forward was a event in Chinese history that merits the telling of more than a few personal accounts. While written records certainly play into the telling of the history, any China scholar worth their weight in salt would be well aware that these "documents" are dubious, at best. Dikotter brings this to the fore, but doesn't quite do enough to offset the picture painted by these documents by using personal accounts.

    In all, Mao's Great Famine is a decent read, but certainly not at the top of my list in terms of conveying the realities of the day.

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Karen B
    • 15/06/2020

    Heartbreaking and superb.

    A careful historian sifts through the evidence from official sources to document Mao's famine. Causes, results, responsibility. The callous disregard for the deaths of millions is astonishing. What a madhouse - today the Chairman wants steel, so melt down your pots at home and make unusable slag. Tomorrow the Chairman thinks sparrows eat grain, so mobilize every starving farmer in the countryside to run after sparrows. (By the way, they eat insects - that eat grain.) Dante's Inferno - but real.

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Kassandra M. Bentley
    • Kassandra M. Bentley
    • 05/05/2020

    Timely

    This thoroughly researched book not only serves as a memorial for the victims of one of history's most vile and least acknowledged crimes, it offers insight into modern China and the Chinese Communist Party.

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    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Christian Speicher
    • 22/02/2021

    Suffering and evil are real and unrelated to race or culture

    What has been done to the Chinese peoples under the CCP during the time of Mao will leave you howling and sobbing and nervous in regard of the likely moral quality of his current successor. Here you had a case where due to the export of rice in a time of famine people in socialist “brother nations” like the GDR literally eat away in relative opulence at the expense of suffering and dying children far away. All the while instead of food there remained only mud, unspeakable violence and desperation for Chinese peasants and all the minorities with the misfortune of living as pawns under the grandiose and merciless regime of an evil party with a sociopath at its helm.

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Utilisateur anonyme
    • 16/12/2020

    I wish all politicians would read this

    I deeply empathize with and admire all Chinese victims who have survived this. A huge warning for all those who worship Mao, Communism or 'Big Government'. Looking at today's Agenda 2050 for the EU one can hardly avoid being reminded of 'The Great Leap'.... 'The Great Reset' (?) When Government and pseudo science converge with all public media against the population it turns into an unpredictable beast. - or perhaps quite predictable?
    The many Millions of victims are almost forgotten by many. Same about the mountains of 'wrong' that communism in China brought into the world until this very day. One only needs to look at China's human rights record and 'Tian anmen Square' (1989) as well as the brutal persecution and organ harvesting of many innocent Falun Gong, Buddhists and other religious minorities in China today. A new 'horrorstory' unfolds in Hong Kong right in front of our eyes as the world's leaders of most European nations watch idly and have hardly anything about it... Business as usual. (!!!)