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    Description

    Bestselling author Leonard Shlain explores the life, art, and mind of Leonardo da Vinci, seeking to explain his singularity by looking at his achievements in art, science, psychology, and military strategy (yes), and then employing state of the art left-right brain scientific research to explain his universal genius. Shlain shows that no other person in human history has excelled in so many different areas as Da Vinci and he peels back the layers to explore the how and the why.

    Leonardo's Brain uses Da Vinci as a starting point for an exploration of human creativity. With his lucid style, and his remarkable ability to discern connections in a wide range of fields, Shlain brings the listener into the world of history's greatest mind.

    Shlain asserts that Leonardo's genius came from a unique creative ability that allowed him to understand and excel in a wide range of fields. From here Shlain jumps off and discusses the history and current research on human creativity that revolves around the right brain-left brain split. Most of us now know that there is a split between the right and the left side of the brain; the left primarily controls our rational mind, the right our emotions.

    Shlain discusses the cutting edge research that is refining our understanding of the split brain model and deepening our knowledge about the nature of human creativity. There is more integration between the left and right brains than previously thought. Shlain argues that Leonardo was unique in human history for the degree of integration that he showed. He also speculates on whether or not the qualities of Leonardo's brain and his creativity presage the future evolution of man.

    Leonardo's Brain integrates art, history, science, medicine, neuroscience, psychology, and philosophy uniting all of the ideas that Leonard Shlain studied and wrote about since the publication of the influential and bestselling Art and Physics in 1991.

    ©2014 Leonard Shlain (P)2014 Brilliance Audio, all rights reserved.

    Ce que les auditeurs disent de Leonardo's Brain

    Notations
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    Waho

    Amazingly pretencious and void book in which you will learn that Goethe was living in the 17th century. Give me my money back!

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    • Global
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    Image de profile pour Nick Ingrassellino
    • Nick Ingrassellino
    • 02/06/2015

    Varied Approach with Surprising Results

    Surprisingly interesting, varied, and enjoyable approach. A little less speculation dressed as fact would have been appreciated. Great read. Recommended even for non-Leonardo admirers.

    35 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    Image de profile pour Barry Darnall
    • Barry Darnall
    • 24/02/2015

    Excellent insight on DaVinci

    Learned so much about a man I only really knee as an artist and inventor. The incredible list of his achievements for which he is not recognized was eye opening and shows how amazing he truly was.

    34 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    Image de profile pour D. McCracken
    • D. McCracken
    • 12/05/2015

    As distracted as Da Vinci

    I had high hopes as I've enjoyed earlier works by the author and am a fan of the artist. But it just seemed to meander from one idea to another was da Vinci unique? Yes. Was his mind unlike any other? Yes. Did this book offer a clear compelling and strong argument as to why? Far from it.

    47 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    Image de profile pour Chuck
    • Chuck
    • 21/07/2015

    Fairly good until the last quarter of the book.

    Any additional comments?

    I was following the authors meanderings until I hit the authors claim that Leonardo was a remote viewer, or in other words, psychic. When I heard that, how much of the rest of the book is pseudo-science? How much of the history is from reliable sources.

    Discounting that claim, the book is good, but mediocre. If I were a psychic believer, I would have given the book 3 stars. The merging of brain science with Leonardo's biography just didn't work all that well. I'd probably would have done better listening to a Leonardo biography or a brain science book.

    14 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    Image de profile pour Alan
    • Alan
    • 04/08/2015

    Uh...what?

    I was enjoying the book. I really was. Then...remote viewing?!? Are you kidding me? The injection of this mumbo-jumbo into the book called into question the veracity of everything that had come before. Sure, there are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy. But as Carl Sagan said, "Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence". I was mad. Felt hoodwinked.

    23 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    Image de profile pour Denti
    • Denti
    • 30/11/2016

    Outdated

    The books premise, that there is a substantial difference between the two halves of the brain, is largely outdated. Thus the conclusions are mainly unsubstantiated. Toward the end of the book, the author ventures into supernatural land, arguing that Da Vinci must have had supernatural abilities such as the ability to remote view. It seems to me like the author's model of the world is stuck in the sixties. Much progress in science has been made since that time.

    3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    Image de profile pour As
    • As
    • 18/02/2017

    Wanted to like it

    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    The narrator was fine, not my favorite but does a good job.

    Would you ever listen to anything by Leonard Shlain again?

    I doubt it. There was a lot of speculation pretending to be fact as well as a great deal of misguided interpretation. His grasp on history and religion is not great. He cherry picks a lot of information about brain science. Overall felt like a clever person with an inch deep knowledge on his subjects.

    Have you listened to any of Grover Gardner’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    yes. Good job.

    Any additional comments?

    I was really excited to listen to this book. I enjoyed it initially, but as the book progressed the leaps in logic were just too extreme. I feel sorry for someone who reads this book and does not have a background in anyone of the various areas he addresses, as they might think that he knows what he is talking about.

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    Image de profile pour Eric
    • Eric
    • 19/07/2015

    Quackery?

    I don't know just how little of the information in here is worth anything, as the author seems to believe some rather odd things. One odd belief is that remote viewing is an established and widely accepted scientific fact and that Leonardo could thus possibly look through space-time. The author often state's that there's no other explanation for things like Leonardo's descriptions of sand dunes, or the number of houses on Crete. Really? Leonardo couldn't have heard or read accounts of these things? Beyond that the work is rather rambling. Captivating at some points, yes, but is the information presented to be taken seriously? As always Grover Gardner's voice is like butter, so you have that to look forward to, at least.

    9 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    Image de profile pour Jay
    • Jay
    • 17/03/2016

    Probably the best book I've listened to

    This is probably the best audiobook that I've listened to. Introduced me to the concept of remote viewing and how the brains of great artists are wired.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

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    Image de profile pour Kevin Rendon
    • Kevin Rendon
    • 26/10/2015

    Book was boring. Some good points but lost me.

    I lost interest after an hour or two. I'm returning tips daily deal. Sucka!


    1 personne a trouvé cela utile