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Description

Dee Brown's eloquent, meticulously documented account of the systematic destruction of the American Indian during the second half of the 19th century uses council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions. Brown allows great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them demoralized and defeated. A unique and disturbing narrative told with force and clarity, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee changed forever our vision of how the West was really won - and lost.
©1970 Dee Brown; Preface 2000 by Dee Brown (P)2009 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Critiques

"Original, remarkable, and finally heartbreaking....Impossible to put down." ( New York Times)
"Shattering, appalling, compelling....One wonders...who indeed were the savages." ( Washington Post)

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Global

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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Rich
  • 30/07/2012

A classic in every sense of the word...

Dee Brown has written some other quality books, but he would deserve a reputation as one of the more readable historians on America's 19th century even if he had never written another word. A true classic, the perspective of which was long overdue when it appeared, this book was as moving for me this year - expertly narrated by Grover Gardner - as it was years ago when I first read it for myself. The shameful treatment of native-American tribes by officials of the federal government at the highest levels, and by the military, should be impossible for any decent person to defend - if considered from the native side. No one has ever presented that side as well as Brown. His research is wide-ranging and his writing is effective. This book is a true paradigm-shifter. No one with an interest in U.S. history should fail to read or hear it.

11 sur 11 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • steve
  • 12/11/2012

So Sad

Great book, even better book for those who enjoy learning about American history and even better for those who are interested in learning about how the Natives were raped, slaughtered and had their land stolen from them. I especially enjoyed how each chapter began with a brief time line of what was going on in terms of history and curent events during those specific years that the book is discussing. Excellent narrator too! He did a great job in reading this book and captivated the listener. There was so much great information in this book, I will definitely need to listen to it again just to try to digest everything.

17 sur 18 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Marcelo
  • 17/01/2011

It's a sad, well written story.

It's the same cycle over and over again. So sad...
Very good book, I recommend it.

7 sur 7 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Che Denine
  • 19/03/2012

Great factual account, albeit a bit repetitive

Where does Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee rank among all the audiobooks you???ve listened to so far?

Top 10%

What was one of the most memorable moments of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee?

Black Kettle's forthright position, and his subsequent betrayal.

Any additional comments?

The book is a fine work. Although it feels like repetition in the accounts of the U.S. Army massacres, I suppose there is no other way to drive the point home in a brutally frank manner - the repetition in the book exists because the repetition in history exists - the

14 sur 15 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • J.B.
  • 12/04/2016

Easy to Listen To, Difficult to Hear About

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American West, by Dee Brown, and narrated By Grover Gardner. I first read the history in the late 1970s. I had to stop before I finished the complete paperback. Too much sorrow. But its poignancy remained in my mind these last 30 years. So it was time to go to the book again. This time on Audible.

Bury My Heart explains the North American Indians realized the white migrants to their land were far too numerous to withstand. So, as nations, they entered into treaties to provide themselves the opportunity to live in peace and preserve some of their traditional life. But the Americans treated the original natives as being less than human. Each treaty promise, and in fact any promise made was never given the slightest necessity to be upheld by the white settlers, their military or the political government. Not even flags of truce. More than once when a parley was asked for under a white flag, it was but an opportunity for the military to murder the peace seeking emissaries. The attitude was ever present that since these were mere Indians they could be lied to, detested, blamed without cause, abused; all done in the name of the superiority of the European genetics and a methodology for taking the bounty of the land from the aboriginal natives. The tragedy is only multiplied because those tribesmen from the Iroquois, to the Cherokee, to the Sioux, to the Apache, to the Arapaho and all the others were obligated in their own moral ethos to adhere to their word and expected the great white fathers/settlers to do the same.

The settler’s lack of compunction against killing a Native American, whether a warrior, a woman, a child or an elderly is now unfathomable. When a native was found they were butchered, for any or no reason at all. The truth is, according to Dee Brown, we, the European Americans, were no better then, than Isis in today’s world. Doesn’t that surprise you? Some examples: At the Battle of Sand Creek on November 29, 1864, U.S. Army Colonel John Chivington, a Methodist preacher, freemason, and opponent of slavery set out to kill any and every Indian he could find with a 700-man force of Colorado Territory militia. In the morning hours he attacked and destroyed a peaceful village of Cheyenne and Arapaho in the southeastern Colorado Territory. His direction and undertaking was to kill and should you wish mutilate, any found Indian. An estimated 70–163 Native Americans, about two-thirds of whom were women and children were murdered. The village men were off hunting. This was not a tragedy by error, it was an intended slaughter, notwithstanding a treaty between the U.S. and the nation to which the village inhabitants belonged to. The whites had a manifest destiny and that permitted not obeying their Treaty obligations. The Indians did not have the same option. In the end, they just needed to be murdered because they were “savages,” according to the Colonel. Then there was General Philip Sheridan who in the Winter Campaign of 1868–69 attacked the Cheyenne, Kiowa, and Comanche tribes in their winter quarters, taking their supplies and livestock and killing those who resisted, driving the rest back into their reservations for no other reason than they were Indians. The Indians left the reservation because the promised lands did not provide wildlife to hunt or livestock to manage, were un-farmable and in most cases the U.S. Congress never authorized funds for meeting its commitments to supply the Treaties’ obligations to the Indian nations with promised supplies. Congress promised but never authorized. When the starving Indians left the reservation to trap food, the American whites claimed a treaty violation and the right to punish the nation for its attempts in derogation of the Treaties. General Sheridan’s two famous quotes are, (1) “The only good Indians I ever saw were dead," and (2) "Let them [the railroad agents] kill, skin and sell until the buffalo is exterminated."

Should you think I have given away the tragedies in the story? Fear not. Bury My Heart has at least a dozen and a half more embarrassments to tell you about.

The Indian nations left us two moral standards which we continue with today and which have become an essential part of our ethos. A man’s word is his bond and we are all humans benefiting from our gracious earth. Because they believed in a man’s word, they succumbed to the treachery of the latter half of the 19th Century American double crossing land grabs, gold diggers, and American politicians.

At least, though, they left us the values of humanity and preservation of our earth. I finished the book this time. An easy read, yet a difficult chore.

6 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Rebecca
  • 16/11/2013

A Book that Changed Hearts and Minds

A look at the treatment of Native American's from their view of the history of the U.S. Widely acclaimed when it was published in 1970, the book brought to light a viewpoint generally not covered in American History.

I knew some of it, from places I've been and other books I've read, but Brown's book helped connect some other dots for me - especially events in Colorado/Arizona/New Mexico/Kansas where I know the name of the person or place, but not what occurred, and what lead up to some of the major events. It definitely makes me want to learn more.

A great follow-up book is "Empire of the Summer Moon".

6 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Bobbijo
  • 05/11/2012

Many nights sleep lost due to great book

What made the experience of listening to Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee the most enjoyable?

40 years after being written, it is still very relavant, and helpful to gain a historical perspective that is not commonly discussed in the mainstream. The book was well written, well read, and very specific, rather than having a pan-American Indian style of generalizing.

Who was your favorite character and why?

This book is full of many real life heroes, why pick only one.

Which character – as performed by Grover Gardner – was your favorite?

NA

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Many.

Any additional comments?

I have had this book on my wish list of reads for years, and even bought a couple copies but never got around to it (as I don't have much time to sit down and read), but thanks to it being available on audiobook, I have finally listened to it, and was not dissapointed at all. I lost many nights sleep due to not being able to "put it down" (what is the listening version to that term?). I have no doubt that I will re-read/listen to this book a few more times in my life.

5 sur 5 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Reggie
  • 17/08/2012

A wrenching introduction to this history.

Would you consider the audio edition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee to be better than the print version?

Having never read the print version, I couldn't say.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

I wouldn't change anything.

What does Grover Gardner bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

It's a compassionate and sympathetic reading. Like all audiobooks it can really express that 3rd or 1st person narrative in a way that reading print does not. There's less projection of the reader into the text.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I did not have an extreme reaction.

Any additional comments?

If a person is unfamiliar with the history of Native Americans and their relationship with the first generations of European settlers, this book is an absolute must-read. It is a history of peoples and societies utterly rent from lands lived upon for thousands of years, by a wholly alien invasion. It is sympathetic to aboriginal Americans, but certainly not unfair to the Europeans whose ingress unto the American continent meant the end of an epoch.



Those familiar with the history of Native American and early Europeans may find this book dated, and overly simplistic. Much progress has been made in telling the story of Native Americans since Brown published this book in 1970, but this criticism is really the ultimate compliment to an author and book that set a standard for examining US history with deep scrutiny, while challenging readers and fellow historians to dig deeper. In subsequent years, the body of literature about these topics has expanded exponentially and some of Browns most controversial theses are now accepted wildly, if not universally, but those who engage regularly with the problem of US History.

11 sur 12 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jonnie
  • 02/05/2010

History from a Native perspective

I've read this book twice so when I saw it in Audible I jumped at it. It did not disappoint for my third go around. Very engaging yet sad as to how we treated the Native peoples.

20 sur 23 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • JAMES
  • 26/02/2012

Touching

I never knew what really happened to the Indians when they encountered the White man. They sure took it hard from the Military. I will be listening to this story again.

8 sur 9 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.