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Description

Paul Auster's brilliant debut novels, City of Glass, Ghosts, and The Locked Room brought him international acclaim for his creation of a new genre, mixing elements of the standard detective fiction and postmodern fiction.

City of Glass combines dark, Kafka-like humor with all the suspense of a Hitchcock film as a writer of detective stories becomes embroiled in a complex and puzzling series of events, beginning with a call from a stranger in the middle of the night asking for the author - Paul Auster - himself. Ghosts, the second volume of this interconnected trilogy, introduces Blue, a private detective hired to watch a man named Black, who, as he becomes intermeshed into a haunting and claustrophobic game of hide-and-seek, is lured into the very trap he has created.

The final volume, The Locked Room, also begins with a mystery, told this time in first-person narrative. The nameless hero journeys into the unknown as he attempts to reconstruct the past, which he has experienced almost as a dream. Together these three fictions lead the reader on adventures that expand the mind as they entertain.

As an added bonus, when you purchase our Audible Modern Vanguard production of Paul Auster's book, you'll also get an exclusive Jim Atlas interview that begins when the audiobook ends.

©2006 Paul Auster (P)2009 Audible, Inc.

Critiques

"Auster harnesses the inquiring spirit any reader brings to a mystery, redirecting it from the grubby search for a wrongdoer to the more rarified search for the self." ( New York Times Book Review)
"Eminently readable and mysterious....Auster has added some new dimensions to modern literature and – more importantly even – to our perspectives on the planet." ( Boston Globe)
"By turning the mystery novel inside out, Auster may have initiated a whole new round of storytelling" ( The Village Voice)

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Notations

Global

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Histoire

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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Great book ! Great reading !

Parmi tous les livres audio que vous avez pu écouter, à quel rang placeriez-vous The New York Trilogy ?

one of the best audiobooks !

Quel était le moment le plus mémorable de The New York Trilogy ?

1. every and each NYC description, ex : "New York was an inexhaustible space, a labyrinth of endless steps, and no matter how far he walked, no matter how well he came to know its neighborhoods and streets, it always left him with the feeling of being lost. Lost, not only in the city, but within himself as well. Each time he took a walk, he felt as though he were leaving himself behind, and by giving himself up to the movement of the streets, by reducing himself to a seeing eye, he was able to escape the obligation to think, and this, more than anything else, brought him a measure of peace, a salutary emptiness within."

Qu'avez-vous aimé de la performance de Joe Barrett ?

excellent ! his voice and reading almost put you in trans ! so great !

Auriez-vous pu écouter ce livre audio en une seule fois ?

the language is so just, I like listening the some passages endlessly before going forward withe the story...

Avez-vous d'autres commentaires ?

the words, the rhythm... Auster says that literature is like music... it is so just again...Auster is a genius composer and Barrett an extremely talented musician ! It is an audiobook masterpiece !

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Lakeman
  • 02/01/2015

The best audiobook I've heard

I don't blindly scatter 5 star reviews around, but this audiobook gets top marks. I'd heard people talk about this book for years, but never read it. Not everyone was complimentary, but even the detractors conceded that it had a certain elusive narrative quality that set it apart.

I finally bought the audiobook about 18 months ago, and have just listened again to the whole thing, for the 3rd time now.

Art, including literature, and including audiobooks, is totally subjective -- it barely needs saying. So there is no criticism or sneering from me towards anyone who doesn't enjoy this audiobook, and/or this story. But I must say that for me, an audiobook fan, New York Trilogy is the best. The narrative, weaving through reality and delusion, is both thrilling and disturbing, and so evocative of hidden corners of our our own lives. The clincher though is the magnificent narration. I say without hesitation that the world-weary tones of Joe Barrett turns from a very good book into a magnificent audiobook.

15 sur 15 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Darwin8u
  • 04/10/2013

Perhaps more interesting than important

REVIEW 1: City of Glass

An interesting PoMo novella. Auster's first novel/second book/first of his 'New York Trilogy', 'City of Glass' is simultaneously a detective novel, an exploration of the author/narrative dynamic, and a treatise on language. I liked parts, loved parts, and finished the book thinking the author had written something perhaps more interesting than important.

My favorite parts were the chapters where Auster (actual author Auster) through the narrator Quinn acting as the detective Auster explored Stillman's book: 'The Garden and the Tower: Early Visions of the New World'. I also enjoyed the chapter where Auster (character Auster) and Quinn (acting as detective Auster) explored Auster's (character Auster) Don Quixote ideas. Those chapters reminded me obliquely (everything in City of Glass is oblique) of Gaddis.

In the end, however, it all seemed like Auster had read Gaddis wanted to write a PoMo novel to reflect the confusing nature of the author/narrator/translator/editor role(s) of 'Don Quixote', set it all in Manhatten, and wanted to make the prose and story fit within the general framework of a detective novel. He pulled it off and it all kinda worked. I'll say more once I finish the next two of the 'New York Trilogy'.

REVIEW 2: Ghosts

An uncanny valley of Gaddis IMHO. 'Ghosts', the second book in Auster's 'New York Trilogy' reminds me what I both like and don't like about MFA writers. Often clever and grammatically precise but they don't say so much. If they were painters their perspective would be perfect and their posters would sell, but the pigment or texture or something between the edges is just missing that undercurrent of something to give a real shit about.


REVIEW 3: The Locked Room

Not much to add that I haven't already written in my reviews of Auster's first two 'New York Trilogy' novels. In 'The Locked Room' Auster dances with the same themes, with slightly different variations. The novellas are more brothers to each other instead of cousins. In a lot of ways he reminds me of an earlier generations' Dave Eggers. There is definitely a lot of talent latent in the guy. He certainly can write, but unlike Fitzgerald who was able to tell a similar themed story in his novels and still provide weight. I just didn't feel the gravity. It was like Camus couldn't really decide whether to kill the Arab, didn't know if he cared or not, so he just walked around killed himself but made the Arab watch.

I don't know. That may not be right. I'll probably just delete this review anyway. Only Otis will read it and I've asked him to delete all my reviews he doesn't like anyway. How do I guarantee this? Well, I could talk about Otis. I could tell you that there are things about author Auster, unrelated to his books I just don't like (who lives in NY Anyway?). He is a bad behaving author (untrue). He keeps sending me his manuscripts and wants me to say nice things about his work (untrue). I don't know. Is Auster married? Maybe, I'll go and console his wife now.

23 sur 26 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Rose
  • 17/01/2011

Starts slow...but gains speed

I would recommend this book but only to a reader with a great deal of patience. The story takes chapter upon chapter to get going. It starts out well, then falls flat, picks up again, then falls flat, then takes off and remains quite interesting. But that occurs in the second part. So if you can survive the uneven-ness of the first part - you should be alright. I wasn't inamoured of the narration either. Well Mr. Barrett has a pleasantly relaxing style - I found it maybe too relaxing and sometimes much drabbly monotone. He was putting me to sleep - or maybe it was the story. Maybe it's not my cup-o-tea.

4 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Marc
  • 18/06/2011

This is exceptional fiction. Superb narration.

Auster's New York Trilogy is excellent literature; not for the faint of heart and perhaps not for fans of typical popular fiction. Labeling this work "postmodern detective fiction" does it a certain disservice. Surreal and strange, Auster's three stories blend well but City of Glass is surely the standout. If you like Kafkaesque characters and scenarios, fiction and plot lines which blur and bleed between stories and out of the pages, and dark unsettling cityscapes; Auster's masterpiece will be right up your proverbial alley.

Joe Barrett's gruff detective-style voice was seemingly hand-picked by Auster himself. Great stories, great reading. Highly suggested.

4 sur 5 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Elizabeth
  • 01/02/2017

Gripping, thought-provoking, hilarious

I loved this read. The middle story did drag - like repeating the first story without any of the fun stuff. But the first and last stories were fantastic - really genuine and free of many of the usual story-telling conventions that can stifle an author's voice. Also, this is one of the few audiobooks in which the narration is so good I don't think I would have gotten as much out of it if I'd simply read it. So good I gifted the audiobook to a friend.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 08/08/2018

worth it

great literature, good reading. performer does voices for characters; not exaggerated, though, and mostly on point

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Utilisateur anonyme
  • 11/05/2018

Amazing!

Imagine if Beckettt had written a Dostoyevsky book. That is what you are getting with the new york trology.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • bookish
  • 17/04/2018

Postmodern Meh-stery

Is there anything you would change about this book?

Given how long ago this book was written and how many people have read it, this question seems a little silly, but sure: I would tell the author that the whole color-based-naming schema of the second installment just doesn't work. It might have worked in a 6-page Borges story, but it is a tragic decision for a work of this length. Grating and insufferable.

If you’ve listened to books by Paul Auster before, how does this one compare?

n/a

Have you listened to any of Joe Barrett’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

n/a

Was The New York Trilogy worth the listening time?

Not really. It suffers from many of the common defects of post-modern novels, which are not half as clever or as well-rendered as the genre fiction that they attempt to "deconstruct." It's nowhere near as good as the best of Conan Doyle or Christie, for instance.

Any additional comments?

There are some great moments in the first and third installments of the trilogy. I loved the discussion of Don Quixote in part 1, and the effort to reconstruct the biography of a missing/dead childhood friend in part 3. Also laughed at the poo jokes. Well played, Auster!

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Kjr
  • 21/04/2016

Hook, Line, Not a Sinker

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

This book hooked me at first, and the story line I found interesting completely got left on the sideline as the book progressed. Still time well spent, but not the best time I've spent.

What do you think your next listen will be?

Not sure yet

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

The narrator's voice was a little to easy to tune out at time.

Do you think The New York Trilogy needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

Its a trilogy. No more necessary.

1 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Phacelia linearis
  • 20/04/2017

I tried, but couldn't finish.

Would you try another book from Paul Auster and/or Joe Barrett?

Descriptions of New York City in a previous era.

What do you think your next listen will be?

No, I can think of other books that do this better - Here is New York by E.B. White, for one.

Have you listened to any of Joe Barrett’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Auster probes the human psyche and condition with great dexterity. This can add much to a novel, however, I find there must be more to a book than a continual examination of human flaws and foibles.

What character would you cut from The New York Trilogy?

Joe Barrett read the novel will enough.

Any additional comments?

No.

0 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Tedesca
  • 03/05/2010

Geniale Sprache, grandios gelesen!

Paul Austers bekanntestes Werk zählt sicher auch zu den Meisterwerken der amerikanischen Gegenwartsliteratur. In seiner unverwechselbaren klaren Sprache stellt der den Leser vor immer neue Gedankenhürden, lenkt ihn von einer Richtung in die andere und lässt ihn immer wieder anhalten, um das eben Gelesene einzuordnen und zu verarbeiten.

In drei abgeschlossenen Geschichten, in deren Mittelpunkt auch die Großstadt New York steht, erzählt Auster immer wieder vom Leben und davon, wie sehr es davon abhängt, wie oder auch dass man von seiner Umwelt wahrgenommen wird. Auch eines seiner zentralen Themen, der Zufall, spielt eine wesentliche Rolle in allen drei Geschichten, die zum Teil beginnen wie ein klassischer Detektivroman, und letztendlich immer eine Suche der Protagonisten nach sich selbst darstellen. Die Figuren sind oft sehr schemenhaft dargestellt, nur in "The Locked Room" erzählt Auster von greifbaren und nachvollziehbaren Personen, doch auch diese stoßen an die Grenzen der Selbstzerstörung.

Für mich sind letztendlich viele Fragen offen geblieben, die mich noch länger beschäftigen werden. Der Sinn des Daseins, die eigene Rolle und die der anderen, die Wendungen, die vom Zufall gesteuert werden - zentrale Themen, die mir in so gut wie allen Werken Austers immer wieder begegnet sind.

Große Literatur, grandios gelesen von Joe Barett, der mit seiner wandelbaren Stimme die oft sehr distanziert gezeichnenten Figuren ein wenig greifbarer werden lässt.

7 sur 7 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • BikerJoe
  • 04/01/2017

Lost Souls Coming apart

The book might have some charm, but if so, it is a very prickly one. Paul Auster throws three seemingly unrelated stories at you and lets you struggle with them. It is like caressing a porcupine, you might like it, but it does not come without pain.

In the first story “City of Glass” Quinn, a mediocre writer gets mysterious phone calls, mistaking him for a detective. Against better judgment he lets himself getting drawn in an endless and hopeless odyssey through the streets of New York, searching for a deranged criminal, who threatens the life of a psychologically crippled individual. In the course of the search Quinn also meets the author Paul Auster to ask for help. I find this rather awkward and I do not care very much about the author’s flirt with his own popularity.

The second story “Ghosts” is even more bizarre. Blue, a student of Brown, has been hired by White to spy on Black. Blue is watching Black on the other side of Orange Street from the window of a rented room. There is very little going on and Blue is coming apart slowly.

The third story “The Locked Room” starts like a conventional crime story, but deviates slowly into a psychological drama. A friend of the protagonist has disappeared, leaving a beautiful young wife and a baby behind. Even more puzzling though is the pile of novels, plays, and poems, which are entrusted to the protagonist to take care of.

All of the three novels have in common that more questions are raised than answers given. All the three protagonists set out on a quest and in their meandering search they become obsessed, lose their sense of reality and slowly come apart. Towards the end the reader will recognize some hidden links between the stories, but it all leaves a construed and forced impression.

I am not an ardent fan of Paul Auster, but I like most of his books. This one I struggled with. It has a Kafkaesque quality, the prose is great, but the content disappointed me.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Gabi Feller
  • 19/11/2015

Fantastic literary skill - gains momentum as the story progresses

I got the recommendation to read Paul Auster's New York Trilogy as a great classic. It surely is.

The first book has quite a mysterious plot and ends seemingly unresolved and abrupt. The listener should not be discouraged by that!

The second book features a story which does not seem to relate to the first and is quite simple in whoa is depicted. However, reducing the story to this simple frame, the listener gets a very different impression of what is told - it is a totally different style. This story climaxes late and ends as well without a final resolution.

The third book offers another unique perspective from the first person. It is the easiest to follow and bears little mystery. It is also the one that finally masterfully draws the link between the three books - and one is surprised how it all fits!

Great language, great variety of style, and additionally very well read! 5 stars!