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The Last Man Who Knew Everything

The Life and Times of Enrico Fermi, Father of the Nuclear Age
Lu par : Tristan Morris
Durée : 15 h et 31 min

9,95 € / mois après 30 jours. Résiliable à tout moment.

Description

The definitive biography of the brilliant, charismatic, and very human physicist and innovator Enrico Fermi

In 1942, a team at the University of Chicago achieved what no one had before: a nuclear chain reaction. At the forefront of this breakthrough stood Enrico Fermi. Straddling the ages of classical physics and quantum mechanics, equally at ease with theory and experiment, Fermi truly was the last man who knew everything - at least about physics. But he was also a complex figure who was a part of both the Italian Fascist Party and the Manhattan Project, and a less-than-ideal father and husband who nevertheless remained one of history's greatest mentors.

Based on new archival material and exclusive interviews, The Last Man Who Knew Everything lays bare the enigmatic life of a colossus of 20th-century physics.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

©2017 David N. Schwartz (P)2017 Hachette Audio

Critiques

"A lucid writer who has done his homework, Schwartz...delivers a thoroughly enjoyable, impressively researched account.... Never a media darling like Einstein or Oppenheimer, Enrico Fermi (1901-1954) is now barely known to the public, but few scientists would deny that he was among the most brilliant physicists of his century.... A rewarding, expert biography of a giant of the golden age of physics." ( Kirkus)
"Told in a sure, steady voice, Schwartz's book delivers a scrupulously researched and lovingly crafted portrait of the 'greatest Italian scientist since Galileo.'" ( Publishers Weekly)
"One of the finest biographies of the year, The Last Man Who Knew Everything combines the historic, the scientific and the personal in a deft and effortless way. Enrico Fermi was easily one of the most fascinating human beings of the 20th century, a man whose intellectual brilliance was trapped inside an all-too-human shell. The result, in David Schwartz's able interpretation, is nothing short of spellbinding." (Gary Shteyngart, author of Little Failure and Super Sad True Love Story)

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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Peter Ryers
  • 16/01/2018

Excellent

Anyone interested in modern day physics will enjoy this biography. Well written,extensively researched, and easy to understand even for the non-scientist

5 sur 5 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • J. Granlund
  • 18/04/2018

Great story

A little extra effort in researching the correct pronunciation of foreign names, locales, etc, would add to the listeners’ experience. Otherwise, well done! Commendable reading!

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • John
  • 17/01/2018

Good Book About An Important Scientist

This is a good book about a scientist who truly changed the world, Enrico Fermi. Sometimes called the father of the atomic age, he rose from a stable middle class environment in Rome--not a real hotbed of science at the time--to become one of the world's great physicists. This book presents a comprehensive treatment of his relatively short life (he died at 53).

This is a book that can be read a multiple levels. There is a certain level of science in it, but it would probably be overly simplistic for those who have studied physics. There are parts of it that are challenging for a non-scientist such as myself to follow in detail, but the author is really good at explaining the gist of why certain events are important. The story moves well and does not get bogged down, even though it is rather lengthy.

The book provides a very good study of the man. Fermi comes across as an outstanding colleague, particularly in his later years. He had many friends and admirers. He did not just plant himself in his laboratory. He insisted on having lunch (apparently for about two hours) each day with colleagues. He liked to hike and swim. He was quite athletic. He was a good husband, perhaps not as good a father, but rather typical for his time.

I think the book provides a good--and sympathetic--treatment of Fermi and the scientists who were involved in the Manhattan Project. It is extremely easy to criticize them from the space of nearly 80 years. It must be remembered that most of the scientists had immigrated from a Europe dominated by Nazi Germany. Many had worked at German universities. Germany was the epicenter of physics in the 1930s. So they had personal knowledge of the abilities of German scientists, and considerable concern about them developing an atomic bomb. Einstein himself signed a letter to Roosevelt that led to the start of the project. The book covers all of this in great detail, and allows the reader to draw his or her own conclusions.

The narration is very good. Definitely worth your time if you have any interest in the subject.

5 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • wilson hago
  • 02/07/2018

Great book

Excellent overview of the the life of a great scientist. Better than the Pope of Physics book. Good discussion from primary sources.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Chris
  • 10/03/2018

Great book, bad editing

What made the experience of listening to The Last Man Who Knew Everything the most enjoyable?

I enjoyed the book very much. The details about the Fermis, the speculation of the author is useful and guarded, and the narrator was nice. There was some bad editing or something which made the audio in the last part of the book jump repeat.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • PC
  • 11/02/2018

The best scientific biography I've read

This is a most unusual biography, revealing so much about how physics and scientific research work and what it is like to participate.

It also accurately describes the unusual educational and research environment at the University of Chicago (my alma mater).

Highly recommended, without reservation.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Steven Jaynes
  • 28/01/2019

Engaging history of one of the 20th Cent's. greats

I really enjoy science and technology history. This biography I loved. "The Last Man Who Knew Everything" made me very sorry I wasn't born soon enough to personally engage with Erico Fermi. His Nobel Prize for Physics is only the tip of his iceberg of contributions. He won the prize at the age of 37. The Prize was awarded for his paper; "Demonstrations of the existence of new radioactive elements produced by neutron irradiation, and for his related discovery of nuclear reactions brought about by slow neutrons". Those principles led to his project developing the first atomic pile which supported a sustained nuclear reaction In November of 1942.

I was honored to meet several of Fermi's contemporaries who also great scientific talents of the of the 20th century, including Edward Teller, Richard Feynman, and others. I believe, those meetings would all pale in comparison with even a brief relationship with Enrico Fermi. I have visited the giant accelerator named after him. His aura surrounds the place, in spite of it being founded and constructed long after his death.

If you look up "Enrico" on Wikipedia his Enrico Fermi is at the top of the list, as it should be. There, you'll see a rather small article which doesn't begin to describe his contributions to science, specifically physics. It does nothing to impart the greatness of his being and personality . A truly humble man, most willing to share or even give away the credit for great ideas and great developments.

Listen to this account, and you will hear much more detail about the PEOPLE as well as the accomplishments. I think you'll be hooked. If Enrico wasn't a hero to you before you listen, afterwards you'll wonder why Enrico isn't FEATURED as a genuine hero of the 20th century in our schools. He may even have contributed more to mankind than his code-word name-sake for the Manhattan Project, the "Italian Navigator", which of course referred to his fellow Italian explorer, Christopher Columbus.

Give it a try even if you aren't a geek. I think you'll find it captivating

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Kindle Customer
  • 25/11/2018

One of the key figures of 20th Century Science

This is a highly listenable book about one of the 20th Century's greatest scientists, Enrico Fermi. It is strange that he has been "forgotten" in a way that Einstein and Oppenheimer have not, because his work on the inner workings of the atom and how nuclear decay happens are key to how the atomic age and bomb came about. Fermi was well-loved and an excellent teacher - his personality comes through in this book, and I wish there were more teachers and scientists like him around today. There is a fair amount of physics in the book, explained clearly, though it may be a little difficult for someone who has no science interest.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Ramesh
  • 23/08/2018

Great listen on the life of Enrico Fermi

I am not a physicist and therefore did not know his contributions prior to listening this book. It is a great listen to anyone who wishes to know his contributions to the field of physics. The narrator was great and this makes listening excellent. Many times I felt I was present as a witness to the events being described.

I would encourage anyone with interest in the biographies of scientists to hear / read this book. They will come away more informed and strengthened in their pursuit of excellence in science.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Jo Ann C. Stevenson
  • 28/07/2018

Fabulous

One of the best books I have ever read and I am not a scientist or