Votre titre Audible gratuit

The End of History and the Last Man

Lu par : L. J. Ganser
Durée : 15 h et 51 min
4 out of 5 stars (1 notation)

9,95 € / mois après 30 jours. Résiliable à tout moment.

ou
Dans le panier

Description

Ever since its first publication in 1992, The End of History and the Last Man has provoked controversy and debate. Francis Fukuyama's prescient analysis of religious fundamentalism, politics, scientific progress, ethical codes, and war is as essential for a world fighting fundamentalist terrorists as it was for the end of the Cold War. Now updated with a new afterword, The End of History and the Last Man is a modern classic.

©1992, 2006 Francis Fukuyama (P)2018 Audible, Inc.

Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

Notations

Global

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    0
  • 4 étoiles
    1
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Interprétation

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    1
  • 4 étoiles
    0
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Histoire

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    0
  • 4 étoiles
    1
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Trier par :
Trier par:
  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars

Worth the read

One of my favourite books that I don't ultimately agree with. Fukuyama does an impressive job assembling evidence in support of his linear view history. He makes the bold attempt to suggest an end of history, but unlike many of the critics say, he does that suggest that we have necessarily reached that. As an evangelical Christian I agree with both of these assertions but I would not say that history is necessarily progressive seen from a human standpoint (it's difficult to imagine Hitler and nazism being simply a hiccup on the way to progress). Perhaps the current situation in the world could also cause us to mitigate our utopian optimism. In any case, tsukiyama seems to be a competent scholar and this book is certainly a classic.

Trier par :
Trier par:
  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
Image de profile pour Kevin Teeple
  • Kevin Teeple
  • 27/06/2019

An important discussion expertly narrated

When the average American encounters discussion of democracy, it's usually in two broad categories:
A. The unquestioning loyalty to the ideal, in relation to the terrible historical alternatives, like absolute monarchy, fascism, and communism.
B. The attack on the goodness of democracy from people who are loyal to those terrible historical alternatives.

It's rare for a person to encounter not only something that says that liberal democracy is good, but to go in detail as to WHY specifically it is good on its own, not just as the best of a series of bad choices, as in the famous quote of "Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all the others" which is commonly attributed to Winston Churchill but never directly attributed.

With a 15 hour audio book, the central tenet of Fukuyama's argument seems to be this: The human soul is made of three parts, reason, desire, and thymos, Greek for "spiritedness." Liberal democracy is the best way to satisfy all three parts of the soul, and resolves important contradictions that were part of all previous systems of government. Liberal democracy does itself have its own contradictions, but these are minor ones that are problematic in the manner of the degrees in which competing but opposing desires are dealt with, namely Megalothymia and Isothymia, as well as the related balance between liberty and equality, but these are less important than the fundamental contradictions in the relationship of lordship and bondage that characterized historical political systems.

To listen to this book, you don't need to agree with every sentence. In fact, Francis Fukuyama has this odd habit of going into such lengths of explaining contradicting points of view that it becomes very difficult in places to understand whether he's explaining someone else's point of view or explaining his own. But the underlying tenets of his arguments are solid, and his views are well-developed, clearly explained, and amply provided with real world evidence, such that this is not a book that can be ignored. Further, to my view, I do not believe that this is a book that has any logical bounds for a person to dismiss outright after reading in its entirety. Specific parts of the book can and have been criticized on many levels, but the central ideas are too well developed and too well furnished with real world evidence for anyone to have any grounds to disagree with them.

One last comment: L. J. Ganser's narration is great for this, and he deserves real recognition for his reading of the book. Audio quality was perfect, and the entire thing has the loud, clear volume of a professional sound studio. But what really sets it apart is L. J. Ganser's consistent emotional delivery of the entire story. This is, in many senses, a book of philosophy, which in many cases tend to be the most dense texts and most apt to ramble on and lose the reader. While Francis Fukuyama certainly deserves some of the credit for making a book that is both cerebral and accessible, L. J. Ganser needs credit for reading the book, not like a stuffy professor trying to teach a bored class important information, but like a storyteller at a campfire, speaking passionately about a subject that is both important to humanity, and a story that is fun to listen to. In a 15 hour story, never once in the entire thing did I feel like he was droning on, nor did I ever feel that L. J. Ganser was getting tired of reading the story out loud or that his passion and zeal were waning. It's one thing to read an adventure story with passion and interest. It's another feat entirely to read a book of philosophy such that the listeners of the book don't get bored. L. J. Ganser's reading was so passionate and exciting that there were times when I pulled my car into my driveway that I left the audio book running for a few minutes because I was enjoying listening to him so much. He truly deserves five stars for his performance of this book.

3 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
Image de profile pour Pan Vera
  • Pan Vera
  • 26/04/2019

Highly recommend for all social change agents.

this awesome audiobook casts light on how Humanity has achieved its current position and how we might consider making a future that is life serving.

3 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
Image de profile pour hans sandberg
  • hans sandberg
  • 27/09/2018

if you haven't read Fukuyama, you are missing out

It took me many years to actually read (listen to) this book, but it is (despite the fact that some of its arguments are aging and some are flawed) brilliant and profound. The End of History and the Last Man.

7 sur 8 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
Image de profile pour Nelson
  • Nelson
  • 01/01/2019

Only a RAND analyst could come up with this

One of the most ridiculous analyses I have ever read/Audibled. Why does it still have any traction?

4 sur 19 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.