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Editors Select, March 2014 - Full disclosure: I've been obsessed with the story of the Dyatlov Pass Incident – the name given to the mysterious unsolved deaths of nine young experienced hikers in the Russian Ural mountains in 1959 - since I first heard the story a few years back. Filmmaker-turned-author Donnie Eichar seems to share my enthusiasm, because after years of researching the case, he emptied his savings and traveled to Russia on a mission to recreate the hikers’ journey and uncover the truth behind their deaths. Although this was a familiar story to me, I was completely absorbed by Eichar’s retelling. He weaves his own journey seamlessly in with a retelling of the hikers’ story (which he recreates through their photos and journal entries), along with a detailed breakdown of the investigation following their disappearance. And as a documentary filmmaker, Eichar makes sure he has his timelines and sources straight throughout the book. Above all, I think was most impressed by how Eichar treated the Dylatlov Pass Incident as so much more than a creepy tale. He manages to bring a deep human quality to the story, along with immense reverence for the fallen hikers (tone that comes through in his careful narration). I came away from this book feeling as if I had known each one of them - and longing for some closure more than ever before. I won't spoil the outcome of his investigation, but I think it's safe to say that anyone who is interested in this story - or real-life mysteries in general - will be left with plenty to ponder. —Sam, Audible Editor

Description

In February 1959, a group of nine experienced hikers in the Russian Ural Mountains died mysteriously on an elevation known as Dead Mountain. Eerie aspects of the incident—unexplained violent injuries, signs that they cut open and fled the tent without proper clothing or shoes, a strange final photograph taken by one of the hikers, and elevated levels of radiation found on some of their clothes—have led to decades of speculation over what really happened. This gripping work of literary nonfiction delves into the mystery through unprecedented access to the hikers' own journals and photographs, rarely seen government records, dozens of interviews, and the author's retracing of the hikers' fateful journey in the Russian winter. A fascinating portrait of the young hikers in the Soviet era, and a skillful interweaving of the hikers narrative, the investigators' efforts, and the author's investigations, here for the first time is the real story of what happened that night on Dead Mountain.

©2013 Donnie Eichar (P)2014 Audible, Inc.

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Global

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  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Sara
  • 30/06/2015

Mystery & Intrigue In The Ural Mountains

Eichar revisits and examines the unsolved, closed case of the deaths of nine hikers in February of 1959 in the Ural Mountains of Russia. This story has been the fodder of conspiracy theories and speculation for more than 50 years. The author explores the events first hand. He travels to Russia, retraces the journey, meets with family, and pieces together a picture that proposes a reasonable and highly likely scenario. However, the story is so compelling and filled with mystery it still left me wondering.

The author also narrates this book. This was not terrible--but sounded slightly monotone and dire in feeling. I increased the play back speed to 1.25 which helped perk things up a bit. I still had mixed feelings about this--a professional narrator might have been a better choice.

For me, this book was fascinating--not just because of the mystery--but because of the culture clash it presented. I really was intrigued by the author's look at Russia over the last 50-60 years and his fumbling attempts to communicate with and relate to people he met when he did not speak the language. A bold choice and an engaging book.

44 sur 45 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Denise Ryan
  • 08/08/2015

Amazing Story

Whoa. You will never in a million years see this coming. Fascinating true mystery - if you like those things (I do!), you'll love this. Only downside is the author's rotten narration - almost made me give up, he's so monotone. But the story is worth it - hang in there. I still see the hikers in my mind and can't imagine how terrifying their last night must have been.

6 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Kathy
  • 30/06/2014

Always a sucker for unsolved mysteries!

I breezed through this book in record time. It seems I still can't resist an unsolved mystery.

This true story fascinated me and at no time did I find it boring, like several other reviewers. I found the details haunting and frightening--I can't even begin to imagine what those 9 hikers went through before their terrifying deaths. This is a creepy, mysterious true event that defies logical explanations. Whatever the actual cause was, it necessarily has to be as weird and strange as the manner in which the 9 hikers died. This is why I think the author has posited a reasonable explanation as to what actually happened. His unexpected explanation makes sense and certainly is plausible. However, I believe that no one will ever know for sure the events of that fateful night.

I have mixed feelings about Donnie Eichar doing his own narration. He most likely has no previous experience narrating an audiobook and this was obvious. In parts, it felt like he was just reading someone else's pages with little or no expression. On the other hand, I got a feel for his earnestness and for who he really is. I could see that this mystery tied him up in knots and wouldn't let go until he did what he could to investigate what really happened to the hikers. I don't think a professional narrator, someone who was perhaps older and more mature, could have really conveyed the real Donnie. So, this is a case in which I won't complain about an author reading his own book. While it certainly wasn't the best narration, it served a useful purpose for me.

Over all, this was an intriguing listen and I will be thinking about it in bed at night for a long while.

25 sur 28 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Dekabrist
  • 13/10/2014

The Dyatlov Pass Incident is always interesting!

Would you listen to Dead Mountain again? Why?

Yes, I would listen to it again. I like the topic and the time period during which the incident happened. Listening to the book takes me away to that time.

Which scene was your favorite?

The theory put forth at the book's end was the most interesting for me, as well as his description of the groups last couple hours of life.

Any additional comments?

I have lived in Russia for over 15 years and the last 5 years in the Urals. The only thing I did not like was the author's naive comments/view of Russia. For example, in 2012, you could definitely photograph anything you wanted in the Yekaterinburg train station. He paints a typical naive picture of Russia and its residents. Often people here do not live just to go to 'fast-food' restaurants (i.e. food from Sysco cans, soup from powder, everything frozen and fried) and super WalMart. You feel the everything in the USA is better attitude and not a real interest and appreciation for different cultures.

24 sur 27 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Log Cabin Pat
  • 27/07/2015

Needed a professional narrator

Donnie Eichar has written an interesting book about a true modern day mystery. I normally don't like books that skip around in time, but this one works, blending his modern day experiences in Russia with those of the Dyatlov party and the later rescue expedition. I like that he investigates a lot of possible explanations but doesn't give any but the briefest mention to fringe theories like a Yeti or space aliens. I find the new theory that he posits at the end to be very credible.

However, the book is ruined by his pedestrian narration. You would think a writer reading his own stuff would come off as conversational, but this guy sounds like he is just reading words on a paper that he had never seen before. Surely an editor or producer somewhere down the line was aware of his poor performance. Everything is read in a very flat voice and there is generally a pregnant pause before he s-l-o-w-l-y tackles Russian surnames, of which, you can imagine, there are a lot of in this book. It's not un-listenable; I've heard worse, sad to say, but the book would have been SO much better with a professional narrator, someone like Bronson Pinchot perhaps, who could easily manage the Russian names.

BTW, sometimes a writer can also be a good narrator - listen to Linda Tirado's "Hand to Mouth" if you want to hear a great example.

5 sur 5 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Patrick
  • 01/06/2016

A Good Creepy Mystery

I had come across this story on a couple of occasions but had very little information on it and was so glad to have located this book while browsing Audible. It's the true story of the Dyatlov Pass Incident and the inexplicable deaths of nine experienced hikers. It's one of those strange but true tales that leaves a person shuddering. Speculation and theories surround the mystery of what happened to make them leave the security of their tent, in subarctic temps, scantily clad, and which ultimately brings them to their death.

The book was well researched and fascinating. But, this is Eichar's (the author) take of what he suspects happened to them, and is not completely concrete. I'll stop there to not get into spoiler territory.

Overall: This was one of those books that had me totally engrossed and when finished spent an hour researching the Internet for photos of the mountain and places named in the book. The narrator was perfect, and had the "documentary" type of voice. It reminded me of a voice you'd hear on NPR.

If this review helped you, please click the button below...thanks.

9 sur 10 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Bruce
  • 22/03/2014

Fascinating and compassionate investigation

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Absolutely. Eichar carefully reconstructs a fascinating tragic mystery and works toward a solution with integrity and a solid awareness of his own limits. It's educational in the best way.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Dead Mountain?

The vivid recreations of the lives of these Soviet students of the '50s, particularly the various ways music played such a large part in their individual and shared experiences.

What about Donnie Eichar’s performance did you like?

Hearing the Russian and scientific terms pronounced right.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I was very moved, appreciative of Eichar's interest in getting real answers and sympathetic to the conclusion he reaches about the calamity that overwhelmed the Dyaltov party.

Any additional comments?

Eichar's reading is very conservative in emotional terms - sometimes too flat and restrained. I get the sense that he strongly wants to avoid sensationalism, and I respect that, but it took a while for me to connect with the emotions as well as the data in his story.

14 sur 17 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Joshua
  • 29/07/2016

Respectable Overview Of The Case

Dead Mountain is composed to two narratives: the 1959 story which reconstructs the hikers journey, disappearance, and attempted rescue; and the 2012 story which recounts Eichar's investigation into the case. Interspersed throughout are various tidbits about Donnie's own life, how schooling worked in the USSR, facts about Russian history, and other not-wholly-relevant tidbits that give the story a somewhat padded feel.

The best audience for this book are those who are new to the Dyatlov Pass case. Donnie Eichar should be given credit for presenting a solid overview of the case, but he doesn't go into the nitty-gritty. He comes up with a theory about the "unknown compelling force" which is rather intriguing.

The reading was fine, though it had a somewhat recited quality to it. Perhaps it would have been better if a professional had read it, but it's not like books of this sort lend themselves to showcasing vocal talent. This story is about the author as much as the mystery so I think his reading it was a good idea.

6 sur 7 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Jean
  • 11/06/2016

Speculative review of incident

In 1959, nine Russian university students went hiking in the Ural Mountains. A month later the abandoned tent was found on a mountain side with long slashes in it. Then the bodies of the hikers were found scattered within a mile of the camp. Some were half dressed. Six died of hypothermia and three from blunt force trauma to the head and chest. A high level of radiation was found on some of the clothing. The Russians closed the area for three years. This triggered all types of speculation about what happened.

This book documents Eichar’s attempt to discover the cause of the un-witnessed tragedy. The book goes back and forth between narrations of his investigation experience to the 1959 story. For his research Eichar uses the students’ diaries, photographs, interviews with family and friends, and investigative reports as well as other government documents. The author interviewed a NOAA scientist who reported a “tornadic Vortices” that produced infrasound in the area of the camp that night. Eichar also states that violent foul play cannot be ruled out. The author also reviews the various other theories over the years.

The book is highly readable and interesting but at the end the reader is no wiser about what happened that night on the mountain. The author narrated his own book.

6 sur 7 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • David
  • 14/08/2015

Maybe it was bears

The Dyatlov Pass Incident has all the ingredients necessary for a creepy, enduring mystery: back in 1959, nine Russian college students went for a hike in the Urals, an inhospitable, avalanche-prone region, and never returned. Search parties eventually found their bodies, scattered, unclothed, with body parts missing, their tent mysteriously torn open. Add in the predictable Soviet cover-up, unnatural radiation levels found in the bodies, and UFO sightings, and it's a virtual buffet for conspiracy theorists. Exactly what happened to the hikers has never been determined.

Donnie Eichar, an American journalist who came across the old story by chance, exhausted much of his funds traveling to Russia, interviewing family members, trying to track down the last survivor of the hiking party, and retracing their steps, while trying to solve a mystery that's gone unsolved for over half a century. Understandably, the Russians he spoke to were skeptical, wondering why an American cared so much about something that happened in the Soviet Union before he was born, how much money he was making for this book, and what he was going to discover that Russian authorities never did.

It turns out that most of the more lurid details (such as one hiker's missing tongue, and the knife slashes in their tent) have fairly mundane explanations. But none proven. Russians to this day have plenty of theories about what happened, ranging from a sudden windstorm or avalanche to a bear attack, or one of the party going mad and attacking the others in a psychotic fit, and of course the most popular, that they witnessed a classified missile launch or some other weapons test and were killed by security forces.

That's even without exploring the sort of theories that would appeal to the fantasists among us. Seriously, nine hikers found mysteriously dead in the mountains just begs for some Lovecraftian explanation. Eichar's description of the region makes it easy to imagine all sorts of inhuman things lurking in the crevices and the snow, waiting for hapless humans to stumble upon them.

Unfortunately for the fantasy-minded, Eichar summarily dismisses aliens or any other supernatural explanation, and unfortunately for those who love a good, creepy mystery, Eichar's narration is comprehensive but flat, with chapters spent going over the biographies and personalities of each dead hiker, then the physical evidence, his own experiences as he researched their story, and finally, his presentation of the most plausible theory.

It's a bit of a let-down, although even the most plausible theory is still just a theory. So maybe it really was those giants that Hagrid met.

Eichar narrates his own book, and has the common failing of authors narrating their own books - he is not a professional voice actor and so he reads his own words in a dry monotone, very clear and understandable, but it drains most excitement from the story.

9 sur 11 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.