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Tombland

The Shardlake Series, Book 7
Lu par : Steven Crossley
Série : The Shardlake Series, Volume 7
Durée : 37 h et 41 min
4,0 out of 5 stars (2 notations)

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Description

Tombland is the seventh novel in C. J. Sansom's number one best-selling Shardlake series

Spring, 1549.

Two years after the death of Henry VIII, England is sliding into chaos....

The nominal king, Edward VI, is 11 years old. His uncle Edward Seymour, Lord Hertford, rules as Protector. The extirpation of the old religion by radical Protestants is stirring discontent among the populace while the Protector’s prolonged war with Scotland is proving a disastrous failure and threatens to involve France. Worst of all, the economy is in collapse, inflation rages and rebellion is stirring among the peasantry.

Since the old King’s death, Matthew Shardlake has been working as a lawyer in the service of Henry’s younger daughter, the Lady Elizabeth. The gruesome murder of the wife of John Boleyn, a distant Norfolk relation of Elizabeth’s mother - which could have political implications for Elizabeth - brings Shardlake and his assistant Nicholas Overton to the summer assizes at Norwich. There they are reunited with Shardlake’s former assistant Jack Barak. The three find layers of mystery and danger surrounding the death of Edith Boleyn, as a second murder is committed.

And then East Anglia explodes, as peasant rebellion breaks out across the country. The yeoman Robert Kett leads a force of thousands in overthrowing the landlords and establishing a vast camp outside Norwich. Soon the rebels have taken over the city, England’s second largest.

Barak throws in his lot with the rebels; Nicholas, opposed to them, becomes a prisoner in Norwich Castle; while Shardlake has to decide where his ultimate loyalties lie, as government forces in London prepare to march north and destroy the rebels. Meanwhile he discovers that the murder of Edith Boleyn may have connections reaching into both the heart of the rebel camp and of the Norfolk gentry....

Includes a historical essay from the author on Reimagining Kett's Rebellion.

©2018 C. J. Sansom (P)2018 Macmillan Digital Audio

Ce que les auditeurs disent de Tombland

Notations
Global
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Interprétation
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Histoire
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  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars

Interesting but boringly lengthy

The paper version of the book is about four inches thick and the audio version lasts 1 1/2 days. The plot is rather weak and uninteresting. The actual purpose of the book is an in-depth and remarkably accurate description of the 1549 rebellion of commoners against gentlemen. The final chapter about the actual history of the rebellion is very interesting. Don’t skip it even though it lasts two hours! Although a great fan of Shardlake novels, I got bored many times by the uninteresting dialogs and lengthy descriptions CJ Samson has introduced. This, in my opinion, is the weakest of his novels. It would have been much better if it had been cut by half. Still, if you like Shardlake and the Tudor era, it is worth reading / listening. The good news is, it does not require much concentration... Not much happens while your mind is focusing elsewhere. The performance of the narrator is outstanding. His elocution is flawless, making it easy to understand for non native listeners. Dialogs are notably well rendered, with an endless array of voices.

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  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
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  • peter
  • 27/12/2018

Dreary, bloated and repetitive

Obviously I am in the minority of readers who found this book impossible to finish. Well, not impossible because as a background noise while doing other more interesting things it works quite well, but as an entertainment it surely demands more patience and forbearance than I for one am willing to accord it. The characters are almost universally unlikeable and fall into three discernible categories: dithering and ineffectual, those detestable in their resentments, and the mentally incompetent. The hero falls within the first category so we have to follow his failure to notice the obvious for more than 30 hours while the author diverges, pads, props up, repeats (and repeats and repeats) to fill the vacuum left by an amazing lack of imagination - amazing because the basic concept for the series is quite imaginative and original. For example, the hero is a hunchback, in itself quite a novel idea for a hero, but a fact that the author feels it necessary to restate at least once a chapter, while inserting phrases such as 'my back ached', 'my back was hurting', 'my back was painful', 'my back was giving me discomfort' so frequently that I was able to predict the next incidences quite accurately. This physical anomaly turns out to be the the hero's chief personality trait - aside from being incapable of making any progress in his investigation for upwards of 30 dreary hours, or did I say that already? Oh, and regularly handing out 'a few shillings' to the economically and mentally challenged denizens of the historical period as the author wishes us to perceive it. When I find myself sighing and grinding my teeth despite beginning with the best intentions to find the novel as gripping and absorbing as my fellow readers insist, I just have to stop listening. Fortunately I found John Biggins' truly excellent but severely under appreciated series with which to heal the spiritual trauma.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Kerryann Ifill
  • 12/02/2019

Disturbing trend

I've always enjoyed the books in this series and was very excited when I found this one. The story was interesting as always, the historical setting lovely. What disturbs me though is the introduction of so many sear words! Are these historically accurate or are they inserted to add modes appeal? The author has obviously invested much effort in to research and thus does not need such cheapening flourishes. Even if the "common" folk used such language, gentlemen of that era would never use such muscular language - especially in the presence of ladies. Great story, but no need to inflict such language on readers.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Amazon Customer
  • 12/12/2018

Excellent I could not put it down

Loved it as I have all other books in this series. Fiction based on historical fact I can think of a better way of learning some history, and get a feeling of what life was like in the 1500's, and at no point did I feel I was being lecture at or being taught some history, just listening to a very good highly believable story. Steve Crossley's narration as always is excellent and can't imagine this being read by any other reader.