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The Talent Code

Greatness Isn't Born. It's Grown. Here's How.
Lu par : John Farrell
Durée : 6 h et 12 min
4.5 out of 5 stars (4 notations)

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Description

What is the secret of talent? How do we unlock it? This groundbreaking work provides listeners with tools they can use to maximize potential in themselves and others.

Whether you’re coaching soccer or teaching a child to play the piano, writing a novel or trying to improve your golf swing, this revolutionary book shows you how to grow talent by tapping into a newly discovered brain mechanism.

Drawing on cutting-edge neurology and firsthand research gathered on journeys to nine of the world’s talent hotbeds - from the baseball fields of the Caribbean to a classical-music academy in upstate New York - Coyle identifies the three key elements that will allow you to develop your gifts and optimize your performance in sports, art, music, math, or just about anything.

  • Deep Practice. Everyone knows that practice is a key to success. What everyone doesn’t know is that specific kinds of practice can increase skill up to ten times faster than conventional practice.
  • Ignition. We all need a little motivation to get started. But what separates truly high achievers from the rest of the pack? A higher level of commitment - call it passion - born out of our deepest unconscious desires and triggered by certain primal cues. Understanding how these signals work can help you ignite passion and catalyze skill development.
  • Master Coaching. What are the secrets of the world’s most effective teachers, trainers, and coaches? Discover the four virtues that enable these “talent whisperers” to fuel passion, inspire deep practice, and bring out the best in their students.

These three elements work together within your brain to form myelin, a microscopic neural substance that adds vast amounts of speed and accuracy to your movements and thoughts. Scientists have discovered that myelin might just be the holy grail: the foundation of all forms of greatness, from Michelangelo’s to Michael Jordan’s. The good news about myelin is that it isn’t fixed at birth; to the contrary, it grows, and like anything that grows, it can be cultivated and nourished.

Combining revelatory analysis with illuminating examples of regular people who have achieved greatness, this book will not only change the way you think about talent, but equip you to reach your own highest potential.

©2009 Daniel Coyle (P)2019 Random House Audio

Commentaires

"I only wish I'd never before used the words 'breakthrough' or 'breathtaking' or 'magisterial' or 'stunning achievement' or 'your world will never be the same after you read this book.' Then I could be using them for the first and only time as I describe my reaction to Daniel Coyle's The Talent Code. I am even willing to 'guarantee' that you will not read a more important and useful book in 2009, or pretty much any other year. And if all that's not enough, it's also 'a helluva good read'." (Tom Peters, author of In Search of Excellence)

"This is a remarkable - even inspiring - book. Daniel Coyle has woven observations from brain research, behavioral research, and real-world training into a conceptual tapestry of genuine importance. What emerges is both a testament to the remarkable potential we all have to learn and perform and an indictment of any idea that our individual capacities and limitations are fixed at birth." (Dr. Robert Bjork, Distinguished Professor and Chair of Psychology, UCLA) 

“Daniel Coyle digs deep into the core of the insatiable desire to become ‘better’. An amazing read with many practical applications for everyday life.” (Apolo Anton Ohno, Olympic gold medalist)

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Notations
Global
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Interprétation
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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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Image de profile pour RAFAEL E SUAZO
  • RAFAEL E SUAZO
  • 20/08/2019

Simple and to the point!!

Loved it. straight up. good stories and practical tips. Recommending this book to my teams!

2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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Image de profile pour Sarah Radell
  • Sarah Radell
  • 16/06/2020

Great Coaching Book

I read this for a coaching class for graduate school. It was great for my first coaching book. I'm not sure what he said about neurons in this book is true. I was telling someone in the science field about this book and they didn't agree with that. That aside, I learned quite a bit about how to communicate with my coachees more effectively. I enjoyed listening to all of his stories about effective coaching. Maybe I would have played sports if coaches in my school had more of the attitude that this book describes.

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Image de profile pour Brian A Grant
  • Brian A Grant
  • 31/05/2020

Great for Ballet Masters!

So many things that will help me become a better Ballet Master! i can't recommend this enough to aspiring dance instructors and ballet masters like myself!

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

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Image de profile pour Amazon Customer
  • Amazon Customer
  • 20/05/2020

informative and useful

I found this book to be insightful and interesting in an engaging way, and the reader does a great job. If you are looking for a thorough understanding of how and why some learn to excel and "have talent" while others struggle, this is a great look into the mechanics of building exceptional skill. Great information for those looking to master a craft or skill, be it carpentry, the piano, or a golf swing.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

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Image de profile pour 930TxTechEx
  • 930TxTechEx
  • 09/05/2020

So Helpful!

I felt this book helped me grow regarding knowledge - how a person learns, how a person improves - and confidence. As a musician and a parent, I felt equipped to continually grow personally,’with my own talents, and to help my children with theirs. Excellent, helpful resource!

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

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Image de profile pour José Miguel Novelo
  • José Miguel Novelo
  • 14/04/2020

Do not buy this book, I repeat, do not buy this book.

Total waste of time. Everything in this book is bad, hope I can get my money back, that would be the only good thing about this experience.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

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    4 out of 5 stars
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Image de profile pour Shahak
  • Shahak
  • 24/03/2020

a bit repetative

struggled to finish. the storytelling was good, but all stories kind of returned to the same theory and reasearch

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Image de profile pour Pablo espino
  • Pablo espino
  • 24/03/2020

Educative

Learned a lot about how learning works, if that makes sense! Author explains well and breaks down information to make it chewable.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

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  • Edward P.
  • 10/02/2020

Good Book

Great points made throughout this book. One caveat I would make is about the final chapter. I would expand more on the failings of the team and their coaching in regards to Jamarcus Russell. Otherwise, it may seem counterintuitive to the items discussed in this book. It seems like the author set it up that way in his final sentence of the chapter, but I would not gamble on that one sentence conveying the message accurately.

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Image de profile pour Peter Joshua
  • Peter Joshua
  • 30/09/2019

Now, I must obtain THE TALENT CULTURE.

One must develop valuable skills to be valued by strangers. Don't waste time faking it.

4 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Image de profile pour Georg Michna
  • Georg Michna
  • 12/12/2019

Yes, But Myelin Is Not a Silver Bullet Explanation

Split between "ooh, cool" and "ARRGH STOP!"

The core message here is very important and very useful. So if the choice is between skipping the topic and listening to this, go and buy it. Typically, when people talk about talent, it's a trick to throw unfavored children under the bus, a highly immoral practice that this book beautifully exposes.

However, Daniel Coyle has a bit of a weird problem: he's a myelin junkie. He is apparently unable to talk about any adaptive response of the human brain without focusing on myelin and myelin ONLY. This creates a silly, reductionist experience in which mind-opening examples of effective teaching and learning are suddenly interrupted by a mindless tirade of how axons somewhere were surely being myelinated!

While he goes in some detail to justify this – mainly the brain's ability to calibrate timings by adjusting myelin thickness – most of the time he just goes completely off the rails and makes it sound like a brain baked solid into myelin would solve all our problems. These passages become very unscientific and hard to listen to.

The observational parts, on the other hand, are beautiful. And they do indeed show off the routine-training of the brain, and different methods to effectively interact with it.

Would I recommend this? Yes, but with a word of caution. If you can mentally replace the myelin hyping with a more general appreciation of the brain's adaptivity, overall, it should be an enjoyable and educating experience.

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