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Description

From one of the world's best-selling science-fiction writers: the complete and unabridged audio of this tense and thrilling epic, read by Toby Longworth.

AD 3580. The Intersolar Commonwealth has spread through the galaxy to over a thousand star systems. It is a culture of rich diversity with a place for everyone. Even death itself has been overcome. But at the centre of the Commonwealth is a massive black hole. This Void is not a natural artefact. Inside there is a strange universe where the laws of physics are very different to those we know. It is slowly consuming the other stars of the galactic core - one day it will devour the entire galaxy.

Inigo, a human, has started to dream of a wonderful existence in the Void. He has a following of millions of believers and they now clamour to make a pilgrimage into the Void to live the life they have been shown. Other starfaring species fear their migration will cause the Void to expand again. They are prepared to stop them no matter what the cost.

And so the pilgrimage begins....

©2008 Peter F. Hamilton (P)2008 Macmillan Digital Audio

Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

Notations

Global

  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Histoire

  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Il n'y a pas encore de critique disponible pour ce titre.
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  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Matthew
  • 04/08/2008

A little confusing to start with.. and then...

OK I found the start of this book a little confusing, the narrative flits around like a butterfly from plotline to plotline without fully explaining who the characters are, but you get the hang of it eventually.
And then... Just when I was really getting into the book, it ended. It didnt really end with a satisfactory conclusion, or even a cliffhanger to have you wanting a sequel, it just stopped. It's as if the author was told by the publisher to hurry up and finish it. Well I for one am hoping there is a sequel. But I can only give it 3 stars because of it's ending.

6 sur 8 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jon Nielsen
  • 01/12/2008

Complex, fascinating and thrilling

Hammilton does again. Creating a truely manificient Si-Fi future, with a magnitude of ideas and technology I for one have not come across before. The plot unwinds slowly - this book alone is over around a 1000 pages and the story continues in the newly released follow-up. But that does not make Hammilton a slow writer - the story is facinating and captivating all the way through.

Reades migh be confused by the sheer number of characters and parallel plotlines, as well as the little trick of inserting a series of dreams essential to the plot inbetween the normal chapters. But rest assured knowning that Hammilton is the man to bring it all together to create that perfect picture in the end (the eventual end, that is).

It might be recommended that you start with Pandoras Star followed by Judas Unchained, since a few characters reapper (and that series is now completed). Not essential though, as the timeline has progressed 1200 years, and the plot is all new.

Hammilton is a must-read for Si-Fi fans, but be warned: Like me, you might not be able to turn it off. Beam me up.

3 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Chris
  • 14/06/2011

Superbly voice acted and paced

Toby Longworth's narration places this audiobook at the pinnacle of dozens I've heard from Audible. His pacing and voice acting is effective and diverse, and brings the book to life. The Dreaming Void itself is pure space opera, and really enjoyable. My previous exposure to Hamilton was via the Night's Dawn trilogy, which spun off into left field with its mystical/afterlife/religious overtones. I'm very glad to report that with a mix of post-singularity galactic society and very human politicking this one feels a lot more like Ian M Banks' style, particulary when the measured pacing explodes into the microsecond scale and violent energy of high technology combat. Great space opera, but the clincher for this audiobook is unsurpassed commitment and acting by the narrator.

1 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Katarina
  • 17/01/2018

Smart combination of scifi & fantasy!

From the beginning this novel requires your attention - no vacuum cleaning or shopping while listening please - as per usual, it seems, with Hamilton's work. The plot takes its time to unfold in all its detail, sauntering unhurriedly forward while you meet all of its well-fleshed out characters. But then: a novelty, a story-within-a-story, a novel-within-a-novel even, and to Hamilton's credit I cannot make up my mind which of the two I liked better. I might love them equally well - although Inigo's dreams, which make up this interwoven second novel, are more action-driven with a higher pacing, so I guess I do prefer that storyline a little.

In my opinion Hamilton has brilliantly succeeded in combining scifi and fantasy in one great tale, without the genres ever actually crossing over. A smart move, and smartly done. The novel hints at the two stories, or at least their worlds, being integrated in one of its sequels, but this first part will have none of that. Loved it!

After The Commonwealth Saga, The Dreaming Void has a new narrator, which comes with its perks and its disadvantages. On the plus side, there are actual sentence breaks in the correct places now, and some clarifying seconds of silence between chapters. What.a relief that was, compared to the prequels. My criticism of this change of narrator however slightly outweighs its advantages. For Mr. Longworth pronounces certain names of characters and species differently from what we have become acquainted with in the Commonwealth Saga, which I found slightly annoying and couldn't get used to. Also, his acting voice for the different characters is, naturally, different from John Lee's, which includes inflection of voice, and the way certain sentences are intoned. I found this distracting as well because the effect was that several well-loved characters didn't sound like themselves anymore. So I was glad to notice that John Lee, the original narrator of the Commonwealth Saga, returns to parts 2 and 3 of the Void trilogy.

All in all I liked this first part of the Void trilogy enough to recommend it to anyone who likes the Commonwealth Saga, or simply Peter Hamilton's work.

0 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Dmitry
  • 26/06/2017

John Lee or Peter Kenney should have read it

The Commonwealth is going post physical. And it's thousand year old​ scions sound like pirates. Each and every one.

0 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Mattias H
  • 17/06/2017

Great story, over acted

Great book. Toby Longworth has a nice "narrators voice" but the voice acting is over the top. Half the male characters and nearly all the females sound like idiots. Even Paula Myo (scandal!). I'll read the rest of the series myself.

0 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Koen Van Overberghe
  • 19/03/2017

A compelling read requiring a focused listener

I started reading/listening to The Dreaming Void shortly after finishing the commonwealth saga books, and it took me some time getting to grips with the new reality after a 1500 year time lapse.

As typical with Mr. Hamilton 's books, the story is never less than grand, the ideas are inspiring and there's plenty of material introduced in The Dreaming Void for the rest of the trilogy. I found the dual storyline refreshing yet demanding on the reader's focus - leaving me to read some different stories in that last - half - hour before sleep time frame.

in all, a compelling read with a decent cliffhanger ending.

Combining the eBook and the narration worked out well for me - I will do it again.

0 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Marco
  • 07/10/2016

Great way to mix old and new

I am rereading all the Commonwealth saga after finishing sky without stars.

the story is great, but I do not like the performance, a bit too forced acting and vocalization for many characters.

0 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Jefferson
  • 24/10/2015

An Entertaining Struggle for Humanity's Destiny

"Justine Burnelli examined her body closely before she put it on. After all, it had been over two centuries since she'd last worn it." So goes life in the middle of the 34th century in Peter F. Hamilton's The Dreaming Void (2007), the first book in his Void Trilogy. Justine usually lives as a downloaded consciousness in the ANA (Advanced Neural Activity) virtual universe, but she's been called upon to don her body (with all its limitations) because ANA:Governance needs physical representatives to deal with the many still physical humans and aliens during a galactic crisis. The Pilgrimage--an armada of ultra-drive starships packed with Living Dream adherents--is preparing to embark for the Void, a mysterious, unimaginably old anomaly. If the Pilgrimage enters the Void, it will either attain paradise or cause the end of the galaxy. Which outcome is more likely or desirable depends on how you envision the peak of human evolution: for Highers (like Justine) it's post-physical life in a collective computer consciousness; for Advancers it's to ever genetically enhance their bodies; for Multiple Humans it's to put their minds into dozens of artificially grown bodies; and for Normals it's to live as naturally as possible. Each of these sub-cultures belongs (at least nominally) to the Greater Commonwealth spread over numerous human worlds.

The situation is complicated by the fact that the Highers are divided into myriad factions, from those out to eliminate all other forms of humanity to those trying to maintain the status quo, and by the presence of many technologically advanced alien species with worlds of their own. Its event horizon and tendency to eat everything around it make the Void resemble a black hole, but it's probably an artifact created by a long vanished alien civilization. Although alien cultures (joined a few centuries ago by humanity) have been studying the Void for millennia, none have been able to plumb its mystery, and only relatively recently could anyone make contact with it: a human called Inigo apparently flew a starship into the Void, dreaming dreams therein that were shared by millions, and then flew out, thereby founding a new religion called Living Dream.

Hamilton's novel, then, concerns the efforts of Living Dream to prepare and launch their Pilgrimage and of other human and alien cultures and factions to prevent them from doing so. Hamilton depicts the points of view of many different humans: Aaron, the mind-wiped, combat "biononics" and battle software equipped super agent seeking the vanished Inigo; Ethan, the new Conservator of Living Dream maneuvering to get the Pilgrimage underway no matter what; Araminta, the black sheep trying to earn enough money to buy a flat to renovate and sell to make her fortune; Troblum, the socially challenged Higher physicist savant pursuing his obessession with the legendary heroes of the old Starflyer War; and more.

Hamilton has fun with future tech and humanity. Space travel via hyperspace, wormholes, starships, and ultradrives. Connectivity via the unisphere, an interstellar internet you access via your u-shadow (avatar-interface). Telepathic shared dreams and emotions etc. via the gaiafield. Nifty weaponry: battle software, energy fields, jelly guns, distortion pulses, nerve janglers, quantum busters, Hawking m-sinks, etc. People are virtually immortal via biononics, genetic enhancements, clones, memory cells, and "re-life." And multiple humans, solido projections, sense-enhancing drugs, and sex focusing software, etc., lead to orgy scenes that actually play a role in the plot by permitting some characters to enter a dream state that may access the Void.

Into his plot Hamilton interweaves a series of Inigo's dreams that may take place in the Void on a planet colonized by humans who use psychic abilities ("farsight," "longtalk," and "the third hand") rather than technology to do things like genetically modify animals. The protagonist of the dreams is Edeard, who begins as a teenaged apprentice in the Egg Shapers guild in a boondocks village and tries to hide his superior psychic powers. These chapters feel at least as "real" and involving as the main story.

Audiobook reader Toby Longworth enhances the novel, giving most of the characters appropriate unique voices: an impersonal u-shadow, a booming machine-translated alien, a coarse NYC-esque black market dealer, a rugged Texan-esque rancher, a sophisticated British-esque villain, and so on. At times he might try too hard, as with the African American-esque voice he gives Oscar Monroe (whom I think the text doesn't say is black).

The Dreaming Void does what the best sf does: entertainingly use the future and advanced technology to examine religion, politics, economics, sex, the body, life, death, and so on, stretching humanity into interesting places that make us reflect on how we live now and how we want to live tomorrow. And the book evokes the sense of wonder with time, distance, and technology. It defamiliarizes the normal: "He smiled down on it the way a Natural man would regard his newborn child." And familiarizes the strange: "Exoimages and mental icons unfolded from neutral status to standby in his peripheral vision, lines of shifting iridescence bracketing his natural sight…. All standard stuff." It is a witty novel, with clever references to things like Barsoom, RAH, and "Somewhere Over the Rainbow."

But I was disappointed that the ending leaves multiple unresolved story strands, including cliffhangers. I wished that Hamilton had brought things to more of a temporary closure plateau at the end of his trilogy's first novel. It made me value all the more Iain M. Banks' Culture novels, each of which is completely self-contained. Readers who like intelligent space opera would like this novel, but should only dip in if willing to read a long trilogy.

0 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • AK
  • 22/03/2015

Fantastic

Entertaining story, very well narated. Can't wait to start reading the next book. I would be a little dissapointed if there wasn't the next book...

0 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

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  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Daniel
  • 24/02/2017

Langatmig und langweilig

Der Sprecher gefällt mir nicht. Die meißten Charaktere klingen irgendwie sehr dümmlich.
Im Gegensatz zu den ersten Teilen der Saga ist die Story sehr langweilig.
Die meißte Zeit habe ich mich nur durchgequält weil ich wissen wollte wie die Geschichte des Commonwealth weitergeht

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • SKodura
  • 12/05/2014

Interessante Story, aber schlechter Sprecher

Ich habe bisher die ersten Teile der Commonwealth Sage gehört, von John Lee vorgetragen und musste zu meinem Bedauern feststellen, das er den ersten Teil dieser Trilogie nicht gelesen hat.

Toby Longworth macht einen zuerst kompetenten Eindruck, jedoch im späteren Verlauf der Story lässt seine Stimmenwahl für Charaktere SEHR stark nach.

Hauptcharaktere klingen wie verblödete Analphabeten oder wie hochnäsige Zicken. So macht das Hören der Geschichte wirklich keinen Spaß, da man ständig versucht die schrecklichen Stimmen zu überhören.

4 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • DB
  • 20/07/2017

Good stoz, horrible voice actor

Let me start with the most annoying element: The voice actor. Toby Longworth gives many characters voices that lets them sound like complete imbeciles. If the story would not be so good, I might have stopped listening to this book. Grateful that John Lee is returning for the next parts of the series.

Story is good, though I am wondering whether it will be too similar to the Commonwealth Saga. Alien race waiting behind an impenetrable shield (Dyson pair vs. The Void) that threatens mankind once opened? Sounds familiar? Hope the next books will continue the story in a way that makes The Void Trilogy different from the Commonwealth Saga.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • me
  • 19/05/2016

Elongated cliché space opera prelude.

Würden Sie dieses Buch einem Freund empfehlen? Warum oder warum nicht?

No. 21 hours where 2 would have sufficed. The whole book is a prelude. Hours and hours of descriptions, no new concepts/ideas, all a jumbled up mix of cliché/popular fiction.

Wie haben Sie auf das Ende des Hörbuchs reagiert? (ohne dabei natürlich zu viel zu verraten!)

*SPOILER*
The, back then, revolutionary slow motion bullet scene in Matrix is just so obviously stolen, that it is the perfect bummer and summary for the book.

Was wäre für andere Hörer sonst noch hilfreich zu wissen, um das Hörbuch richtig einschätzen zu können?

If you like people going on forever about nothing, then this book is for you. If you are into science fiction or what the future might hold for the human race, not for you.

1 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Boshafter
  • 28/07/2016

Story sehr gut, Qualität befriedend

Qualität nur befriedend, da Tonalität nicht optimal ist und einigemale Cuts zu hören sind.

1 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.