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    Description

    From the authors of the international best seller, Why Nations Fail, a crucial new big-picture framework that answers the question of how liberty flourishes in some states but falls to authoritarianism or anarchy in others - and explains how it can continue to thrive despite new threats.

    Liberty is hardly the "natural" order of things. In most places and at most times, the strong have dominated the weak and human freedom has been quashed by force or by customs and norms. Either states have been too weak to protect individuals from these threats or states have been too strong for people to protect themselves from despotism. Liberty emerges only when a delicate and precarious balance is struck between state and society.

    There is a Western myth that political liberty is a durable construct, a steady state, arrived at by a process of "enlightenment". This static view is a fantasy, the authors argue; rather, the corridor to liberty is narrow and stays open only via a fundamental and incessant struggle between state and society. The power of state institutions and the elites that control them has never gone uncontested in a free society. In fact, the capacity to contest them is the definition of liberty. State institutions have to evolve continuously as the nature of conflicts and needs of society change, and thus society's ability to keep state and rulers accountable must intensify in tandem with the capabilities of the state. This struggle between state and society becomes self-reinforcing, inducing both to develop a richer array of capacities just to keep moving forward along the corridor. Yet this struggle also underscores the fragile nature of liberty. It is built on a fragile balance between state and society, between economic, political, and social elites and citizens, between institutions and norms. One side of the balance gets too strong, and, as has often happened in history, liberty begins to wane. Liberty depends on the vigilant mobilization of society. But it also needs state institutions to continuously reinvent themselves in order to meet new economic and social challenges that can close off the corridor to liberty.

    Today we are in the midst of a time of wrenching destabilization. We need liberty more than ever, and yet the corridor to liberty is becoming narrower and more treacherous. The danger on the horizon is not "just" the loss of our political freedom, however grim that is in itself; it is also the disintegration of the prosperity and safety that critically depend on liberty. The opposite of the corridor of liberty is the road to ruin.

    Includes a bonus PDF of the maps and figures from the book.

    PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

    ©2019 Daron Acemoglu, James A. Robinson (P)2019 Penguin Audio

    Commentaires

    One of the Financial Times' Best Books of 2019

    One of Kirkus Reviews' Best Books of 2019

    Shortlisted for the Lionel Gelber Prize

    "What explains the rise and fall of democracy and dictatorship?... [Acemoglu and Robinson] offer a provocative framework for analyzing our current moment of democratic crisis.... A powerful starting point for understanding the many perils facing aspirations for democracy and liberty today...helpfully recalibrates our American tendency to collapse debates over freedom into a binary clash between the narrow liberty of ‘free markets’ on the one hand, and the economic and political freedoms provided by social-democratic ‘big government’ on the other.” (The Washington Post

    “Crucially and rightly, the book does not see freedom as merely the absence of state oppression.... This book is more original and exciting than its predecessor. It has gone beyond the focus on institutions to one on how a state really works.” (Martin Wolf, Financial Times

    “A work of staggering ambition - aiming to explain why liberty has or has not existed at every moment in time in every geography in the world.... It is chock full of delightful detours and brilliant nuggets.... Smart and timely.” (Newsweek)

    Ce que les auditeurs disent de The Narrow Corridor

    Moyenne des évaluations utilisateurs. Seuls les utilisateurs ayant écouté le titre peuvent laisser une évaluation.
    Global
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    Commentaires - Veuillez sélectionner les onglets ci-dessous pour changer la provenance des commentaires.

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    • Global
      2 out of 5 stars
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      3 out of 5 stars
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    • Todd
    • 10/02/2020

    Long and Derivative

    I read “Why Nations Fail” and loved it. Thought it was unique and innovative. This felt very derivative to that work and the case studies didn’t add much. “Why Nations Fail” really described what the Narrow Corridor is - a good balance between state and the people - and how it helped nations succeed or fail if you were out of that corridor. This seemed to cover more examples to support the work they already had written about.

    4 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      2 out of 5 stars
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      2 out of 5 stars
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    • Amaze
    • 19/05/2021

    Weak methodology

    The authors present a theory of societal development. Their work is long on anecdotes, and short on statistics. Therefore, their thesis rests on very thin evidence.

    To take one example of their methodological sloppiness, they make a case that India has been held back by the Hindu caste system. Okay, so let's look at Pakistan and Bangladesh, two countries that are culturally similar, but are Muslim, therefore without the Hindu caste system. They should be doing much better than India in terms of economic and political development. But they're not. So is the caste system really at fault? Most authors have identified the "license raj" as holding back India's development. The authors do not even touch on this alternative theory. I get the feeling that the authors are so in love with their theory that it hasn't crossed their minds that they must confront alternative models.

    Does their theory have any predictive ability? When you push away the verbiage the answer, to my eye, is no. How nations develop seems to depend very much on chance, and even on the particular individual(s) in charge at a given moment in time.

    There are some interesting historical nuggets in this book but as a coherent theory of societal development it is unsatisfying.

    About 2/3 of the way through the book completely runs off the rails and becomes a simplistic blather of left-liberal platitudes. For example, the authors rail against the "robber barons" without providing a single instance of their supposed misdeeds. Early in the book the authors cite certain tribal societies that punish successful people, for example, a farmer who obtains a better yield by using better agricultural methods. But they are blind to the fact that their own left-ish ideology is replication of this leveling phenomenon applied to modern societies. Their whirlwind tour of modern American history is so simplistic it would be an embarrassment to a comic strip for children.

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
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    • hans sandberg
    • 17/12/2019

    Powerful

    The Narrow Corridor provides a simple, but powerful model for thinking about the world. Makes me want to re-read Fujiyama's two books about the origins of power and political order. in a world of increasing closemindedness, and political nostalgia, we need books like these that can open your mind.

    3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    • John
    • 17/11/2019

    Difficult book to get through.

    It was a difficult book to get through but one of the most informative and educational book on the history of governments. I always believed that it was propaganda labeling a particular country communism socialism or capitalism. This book points out why they should not be labeled as such, it explains a whole different way to look at an understand government.

    3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
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    • Joel Smallwood
    • 08/02/2022

    Good with a few blindspot.

    First. to refute the several criticisms that it could have been much shorter without all of the examples. this seems absurd. how can you write a book about a historical theory, without historical examples? I found them very interesting, and informative. And they helped clarify his point.

    my only complaint is that they seemed to have a blind spot regarding the USA. First, I thought his framing of the Constitutional convention and the development of the bill of rights was uncharatable.

    And they had almost nothing positive to say about our founding. For example, the fact that for 200 years the president stepped down voluntarily. This to me is remarkable, and feeds into the framing of the book.

    Also, I feel when they get into the minutia of health care policy, it only muddied their point.

    Not to say that all the criticisms are unfair. Obviously, our relationship with race is awful and feeds well into the narrative.

    All and all, though, Avery good listen.

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    • Don T.
    • 31/01/2022

    Uneven and unfair and eventually boring

    verbose, hates conservatives, and when the theory does not work, it's a multifacited issue, of course. And these elites keep referring to past chapters where they claim to have explained everything....but not so. Evidence that too many authors spoil the soup?

    • Global
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    • Mr. S. Miettinen
    • 07/01/2022

    Fight for your right

    …to just society. Acemoglu and Robinson expand on their Why Nations fail world explanation story with a masterpiece.

    Despotic leviathan i.e. overpowering or downright evil state muat be contained with the force of the power of the society or people.

    In the best case, the two forces dance to prosperity of the people in a narrow corridor. Us in the Nordic countries such as Finland perform a pretty good dance.

    In the worst cases, either the state overpowers its subjects, or there is lawlessness and harmful norms and traditions.

    Includes a fairly good history lesson on various nations from China to USA as a bonus.

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    • Derrel
    • 18/10/2021

    Excellent!

    Excellent book with terrific content. Loving the authors perspective on what moves countries and cultures in and out of the democracy corridor. Excellent historical background on the cultural, political and past governments of many countries around the world. Very interesting discussion and compelling conclusions. I highly recommend this book.

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    • Kindle Customer
    • 04/02/2021

    A great follow up to Why Nations Fail

    The book did not disappoint. It was well written and it has been well read here. It gives a new perspective to development economics and politics.

    • Global
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    Image de profile pour Utilisateur anonyme
    • Utilisateur anonyme
    • 07/12/2020

    The Voice of the narrator is extremely dull

    While the content of Daron Acemoglu’s book is very interesting and examples of countries that have failed or made progress must be considered very good, and non-English readers also stick well to the ideas in this book, I have to admit I couldn’t listen for more than 40-60 minutes in a row. This is very much due to the reader and I would say that it was not appropriate to read the book completely insensitive (cold). I even wondered if this was artificial intelligence reading this book. This is a very unfortunate situation, because this book is really valuable for understanding both the current economy and politics and global developments, and hopefully for a better future.

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    • The Watchman
    • 01/05/2021

    Great content, but taxing speaker

    I found a lot of very good ideas in the text, and in opened my eyes about what factors contribute to a stable democracy ans state. However, the speaker always sounded so exasperated to me, so it took real effort to finish the book