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    Description

    A powerful new theory of human nature suggests that our secret to success as a species is our unique friendliness.

    “Brilliant, eye-opening, and absolutely inspiring - and a riveting read. Hare and Woods have written the perfect book for our time.” (Cass R. Sunstein, author of How Change Happens and co-author of Nudge)

    For most of the approximately 300,000 years that Homo sapiens have existed, we have shared the planet with at least four other types of humans. All of these were smart, strong, and inventive. But around 50,000 years ago, Homo sapiens made a cognitive leap that gave us an edge over other species. What happened? 

    Since Charles Darwin wrote about “evolutionary fitness”, the idea of fitness has been confused with physical strength, tactical brilliance, and aggression. In fact, what made us evolutionarily fit was a remarkable kind of friendliness, a virtuosic ability to coordinate and communicate with others that allowed us to achieve all the cultural and technical marvels in human history. Advancing what they call the “self-domestication theory”, Brian Hare, professor in the department of evolutionary anthropology and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at Duke University and his wife, Vanessa Woods, a research scientist and award-winning journalist, shed light on the mysterious leap in human cognition that allowed Homo sapiens to thrive. 

    But this gift for friendliness came at a cost. Just as a mother bear is most dangerous around her cubs, we are at our most dangerous when someone we love is threatened by an “outsider.” The threatening outsider is demoted to sub-human, fair game for our worst instincts. Hare’s groundbreaking research, developed in close coordination with Richard Wrangham and Michael Tomasello, giants in the field of cognitive evolution, reveals that the same traits that make us the most tolerant species on the planet also make us the cruelest. 

    Survival of the Friendliest offers us a new way to look at our cultural as well as cognitive evolution and sends a clear message: In order to survive and even to flourish, we need to expand our definition of who belongs.

    ©2020 Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods (P)2020 Random House Audio

    Commentaires

    “Please read this beautiful, riveting, and uplifting book. You will learn the astonishing story of how and why humans evolved a deep impulse to help total strangers but also sometimes act with unspeakable cruelty. Just as important, you’ll learn how these insights can help all of us become more compassionate and more cooperative.” (Daniel E. Lieberman, author The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health, and Disease, and Exercised: Why Something We Never Evolved to Do Is Healthy and Rewarding)   

    Survival of the Friendliest is a fascinating counterpoint to the popular [mis]conception of Darwin’s ‘survival of the fittest.’ Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods offer a convincing case that it was not brute strength, raw intelligence, or ruthlessness that allowed modern humans to thrive while our hominin relatives died out. Instead, they argue that friendliness was the key to our flourishing - and that the same kind of cooperative communication is the key to freeing us from the tribalism currently threatening democratic governance around the world. Powerful, insightful, accessible - this book gives me hope.” (Megan Phelps-Roper, author of Unfollow)

    “Very few books even attempt to do what this book succeeds in doing. It begins in basic behavioral science, proceeds to an analysis of cooperation (or lack thereof) in contemporary society, and ends with implications for public policy. Everyone should read this book.” (Michael Tomasello, author of Origins of Human Communication, professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University)  

    Ce que les auditeurs disent de Survival of the Friendliest

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    • Global
      2 out of 5 stars
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      4 out of 5 stars
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      2 out of 5 stars
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    • Dee Faram
    • 07/09/2020

    Good but Unfortunate

    First few chapters very good...interesting and compelling. Unfortunately, it goes political quickly; social justice warrior; goes from compelling evidence to corroboration from like-minded SJWs; critical race theory, etc. Unfortunate.

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
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      4 out of 5 stars
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      2 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour RelizzScholar27
    • RelizzScholar27
    • 11/08/2020

    Science Excellent, Politics Meh

    I was so engaged by the first half of this book. The research on domestication of foxes and dogs was fascinating, offering insight into human domestication through practices of cooperation. Clearly, the authors have substantive expertise here. Alas, the second half of the books veers into political opinion of a very uninformed sort. The authors become jingoist promoters of democracy, extolling virtues with limited evidence, neglecting other forms of government such as democratic socialism that rely more heavily on cooperation than does capitalistic democracy. Stay with the science, kids. Let us draw conclusions about political implications on our own.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
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      4 out of 5 stars
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    • R. MacDonald
    • 09/04/2021

    Weak Arguments and Bad Science

    From implying brain size=intelligence to actually citing the debunked and discredited marshmallow test this book simply isn't credible. This is likely one of those pop science works whose central thesis will spread because it's a "NYT Bestseller" and then quietly be disproven while everyone repeats it for the next decade. Absolutely reeks of reproducibility crisis.

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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    • A. Koss
    • 15/02/2021

    It was an eye-opener into Humanity

    I was amazed at the studies and information that came from this audio. Let's all try to be friendlier!

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Liv
    • 13/09/2020

    Very interesting way of approaching things.

    Finally a strong argument against the survival 9f the fittest among humans. Highly reccomend it.

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Frank
    • 10/08/2020

    Opened my eyes about the light side and the dark side of people

    This is an insightful description of the psychology and neurophysiology of human beings. Helps you understand the political landscape we currently inhabit and how best to understand and navigate it. Highly recommended.

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour J.Michael Campbell
    • J.Michael Campbell
    • 23/07/2020

    An Important Message

    We all hang together or we all get hanged seperately as explained over a variety of scientific literature and the personal experiences of the authors with Bonobo monkeys which are worth the read by themselves.