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Description

In the aftermath of his terrible war, Ender Wiggin disappeared, and a powerful voice arose: the Speaker for the Dead, who told the true story of the Bugger War. Now, long years later, a second alien race has been discovered by Portuguese colonists on the planet Lusitania. But again the aliens' ways are strange and frightening...again, humans die. And it is only the Speaker for the Dead, who is also Ender Wiggin the Xenocide, who has the courage to confront the mystery...and the truth. Orson Scott Card infuses this tale with intellect by casting his characters in social, religious, and cultural contexts.

This, the author's definitive edition of the sequel to Ender's Game, also includes an original postscript written and recorded by the author himself, Orson Scott Card!.

Browse more titles in the Ender Wiggin series.
©1986, 1990 Orson Scott Card (P)2002 Fantastic Audio, an Imprint of Audio Literature

Critiques

Winner, Hugo Award
Winner, Nebula Award
"The most powerful work Card has produced. Speaker not only completes Ender's Game, it transcends it." ( Fantasy Review)

Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

Notations

Global

  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Performance

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Histoire

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Il n'y a pas encore de critique disponible pour ce titre.
Trier par :
  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Joe
  • 13/06/2005

The Enderverse

This is my favorite science fiction series. The characters are easy to identify with, and you will find yourself sucked into this imaginary universe, nicknamed the Enderverse by fans.

Recommended order of reading (in my opinion): Ender?s Game, Ender's Shadow, Shadow of the Hegemon, Shadow Puppets, Shadow of the Giant, Speaker for the Dead, Xenocide, Children of the Mind. Reading the books in this order will keep you interested and keep the story moving more naturally.

If after reading all of these wonderful books you are still itching for an Enderverse fix then read First Meetings. The list above is sorted by the Enderverse timeline. Meaning that the flow of events in the stories are uninterrupted. If you were to read the books in the order they were published, you would bounce back and forth in between time and few of the plot twists in future books would be revealed before you wanted them to be known. First Meetings, however contains short stories that occur both before and in between the list above within the Enderverse.

144 sur 146 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Scott Fabel
  • 24/04/2013

Great story, but the performance was dreadful

After having read "Ender's Game," I was eager to read "Speaker for the Dead." I was definitely not disappointed. According to interviews with the author, Orson Scott Card, "Speaker for the Dead" was the original book that he wanted to write. He wrote "Ender's Game" as a kind of introduction to "Speaker for the Dead." Although "Ender's Game" has become far more well-known and more popular than "Speaker for the Dead," I can see why this was the story that the author really wanted to write. The story is much richer and deeper. I feel as if it's written for a more mature audience, and its themes reflect that maturity. Don't get me wrong. I loved "Ender's Game," yet I think I enjoyed "Speaker for the Dead" just as much--only for different reasons.

Let me get the bad news out of the way. The audio recording of this book was terrible. I don't want to say that the actual performance of the narrators was bad because it really wasn't. The problem was that there were just too many narrators, and they were used inconsistently throughout the book. At times, there were shifts from one narrator to another mid-paragraph, and it didn't seem to be done for any reason. I certainly don't want to say that this lessened the story in any way. After all, it's the same story whether listening to one narrator or 50. Even so, the shifting back and forth was distracting. As if that weren't bad enough, there was also periodic background music that was played during the performance. Again, this seemed to show up in random locations. There was one location in particular in which music just started playing mid-sentence and the ended in the middle of the following sentence. Usually, I expect some of that background music to signal a change in chapter, theme, or something else recognizable. That was surely not the case here. Again, it didn't lessen the story, but it was distracting. It wouldn't be such a bad thing for the story to be re-recorded without the performance issues.

Now, on to the good news. This book takes place 3000 years after "Ender's Game"; however, thanks to space travel at relativistic speeds, both Ender and Valentine are still alive--and in their 30s! In many ways, this book picks up not long after "Ender's Game" concludes. Ender has now become the Speaker for the Dead. After the events that occurred earlier in his life (in "Ender's Game"), he decides to dedicate himself to speaking the death of other people. Perhaps he sees this as atonement for his earlier life. In this book, humans have discovered a new, alien life form, the Pequeninos (also known as "piggies"), on the planet Lusitania. A death occurs on this planet, and Ender is called to speak the death.

This book is far more philosophical than "Ender's Game." The Speaker for the Dead does not deliver a traditional eulogy for those who have died. Instead, he speaks the truth. This concept resonated strongly with me because I think a lot of people don't get to have the truth spoken at their funerals. While this idea of speaking for the dead is a central theme of the book, there are many others. For example, the interactions between the humans and the piggies is extraordinary. It frames the way in which we, as humans, look at anything or anyone who is different from us, as something that needs to be either protected or changed. We seem to think that we are the most evolved species and, subsequently, the most intelligent. Although the book doesn't necessarily contradict this belief, it does make the reader question it. Finally, I want to also mention that the Catholic Church is alive and well in the far-off future. There were very interesting discussions of religious themes throughout the book. The Catholic Church has a prominent role on Lusitania, and it must somehow align its teachings with the new reality of an alien life form.

Overall, this was an enjoyable read. It still exists in the same general universe as "Ender's Game," yet it is its own story. The more mature philosophical themes make this a great book for older readers, but it's still science fiction. This seems to be a great combination, and I look forward to reading other books in the Ender series.

20 sur 21 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Joe O.
  • 29/11/2012

Great story, poor narration

Is there anything you would change about this book?

Use consistent narration. Using several different people that change the emotional delivery and even the gender of the voice is distracting and annoying. Plus, the woman sounds like she should be reading smut, not sci-fi.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of David Birney and Stefan Rudnicki ?

These weren't the only narrators. I would have stuck with them.

7 sur 7 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Danathar
  • 19/06/2009

Great book, really don't like the female reading

Just like Ender's game this is a great book. Harder to get through though. Card spends more time on character development than really needed. The woman who does a good bit of the reading is a bit too melodramatic for my ears.

12 sur 13 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Josh Mitchell
  • 13/04/2006

Good story, okay narration

First, this isn't Ender's Game. It's an entirely different kind of story, so if you're looking for the pseudo-military sci-fi action of Ender's Game, you will be disappointed. That said, this is one of Card's better works, with rich, interesting characters and a fascinating (if slower-moving) plot.

The multi-person reading is not very well done, however. At best, it's distracting; at worst, obnoxious--one of the female readers, in particular, has a habit of reading every sentence as though it's the saddest and most important thing ever written. The book's main narrator is (fortunately) quite good.

Overall, recommended.

18 sur 20 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • J. T. Mitchum
  • 07/01/2009

As implied by title: Not Ender's Game

I enjoyed this book, but I enjoyed it because I did not expect Ender's Game proper.

There was a lot about Ender's Game I enjoyed, but I can sub-categorize all my favorite parts into two important distinctions. Military strategy and group leadership versus interpersonal development and politics.

If you really only enjoyed the military portions of Ender's Game, then you may consider leaving Speaker of the Dead out. Scott Card wrote Ender's Game so he could write Speaker for the Dead. The way he writes the characters in Speaker for the Dead I have found to be a reliable measure for his other books in the Enderverse.

Reading about waging a war is awesome because of the absolution both sides of a war feel, a solidarity under one banner, so to speak. At the end of war, we have fractured absolution and limited solidarity -- complex topics to say the least.

Speaker for the dead is about this post-war universe. The threads of religion and science woven throughout the personalities is beautifully done in a way that should be neutral enough to spawn debate, but with the author's beliefs only somewhat veiled. Reading a book like this often makes me feel we are more predictable in groups than we are when left to our private choices.

This book gives weight to the phrase "where there is a will, there is a way." Of course -- not all wills are good ones ...

30 sur 34 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 08/07/2003

Listen to the Speaker

<U>Speaker for the Dead</U> is a terrific sequel to <U>Ender's Game</U>. Where <U>Ender's Game</U> was exciting and suspenseful science fiction, <U>Speaker for the Dead</U> is like Ender himself, all grown up. Where Ender was a brilliant child reacting to the pressures and problems of the IF, Andrew Wiggin, the Speaker for the Dead, brings wisdom and maturity to the character we all came to love in <U>Ender's Game</U>.

Terrificly narrated by Stefan Rudnicki and the rest of the awesome Fantistic Audio players, I highly recommend this book. The Afterword by the author is also helpful in putting the first two books of series in perspective.

Orson Scott Card has created a terrific universe with his <B><U>Ender Wiggin</U></B> series. I am proud to say that I discovered it here on audible.com and look forward to listening to some of the later books in the series soon.

31 sur 36 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • The Kindler
  • 27/02/2016

Brilliant

Any additional comments?

There is a lot of controversy around Card but he still writes really interesting books that require the reader to think about the implications of each action and reaction. It is a wonderful masterpiece and deserves the reader to think critically about the ideas of Card.

4 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Jan
  • 13/02/2008

The Anti-Ender's Game

I picked this book because I had very much enjoyed Ender's Game and "Speaker" is the continuation of the story. However, it is also completely different in speed and style. While "Ender's Game" is mostly science fiction of the technical kind (spaceships, battles, etc.) and moves along well most of the time, "Speaker" is a tedious, slow-as-molasses study of religion, family relationships, childhood neuroses, and endlessly repeated sermons on tolerance. The passages in Portuguese, on the Catholic teachings, and others are tedious and boring.
You may end up liking "Speaker", but it won't be for the same reasons you may like "Ender's Game". Be forewarned.

48 sur 57 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Cathleen
  • 19/01/2003

Amazing!!!!

As much as I enjoyed Ender's Game, I loved this book more. I liked the action of Ender's Game, but it was the inner conflicts and thoughts of his character that I really enjoyed. (Card made me really care about Ender and what happened to him.) It is just this kind of intimacy that I think is the core of this book. It has such emotional intensity with a transcendant spirituality,that made me want to "inhale" this book. I found myself just sitting in my car long after I had reached my destination just to complete another chapter. This book grabbed me and flung me on the roller coaster of its message, and I didn't want to ever get off.

11 sur 13 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

Trier par :
  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Alexander Kranz
  • Hildesheim Deutschland
  • 03/01/2007

Do you know Ender?

Diese Buch reiht sich tadelos nach Enders Game ein. Es enthält viele interessante Gedanken und Wahrheiten. Der Einstieg war für mich etwas holperig, aber das Buch ist Spitze und bis zum Ende wunderschön. Wer einen kleinen Fable für Science Fiction und Philosophie übrig hat und Englisch gerne hört dem ist diese Hörbuch nur zu empfehlen. Leider empfand ich das Buch dennoch etwas schwächer als Enders Game. Deshalb leider "nur" 4 Sterne.

5 sur 5 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • mansam
  • Ahrensburg, Deutschland
  • 18/03/2007

Eine grandiose Fortsetzung !

Dies Buch ist zwar die direkte Fortsetzung von Enders Game, aber die zentrale Thematik ist eine ganz andere! Es geht hier um die Probleme, die aus Unverständnis füreinander erwachsen. Unverständnis für andere Rassen, Religionen und ganz allgemein für anders Denkende.
Dies spiegelt sich auf vielen Ebenen: Von den Problemen der Kolonisten des Planeten Lusitania untereinander über die in Ihrem Verhalten zunächst rätselhaft unverständlichen Ureinwohner des Planeten bis hin zum global falsch verstandenen Schutz der Außerirdischen durch die menschliche Rasse, die eigentlich doch nur sich selbst beschützen will.

Ender Wiggins Aufgabe besteht hier darin, als 'Sprecher für die Toten' die Wahrheit hinter den vorschnellen Annahmen und falschen Vorraussetzungen zu sehen, und für andere sichtbar zu machen, um dadurch seine persönliche Schuld am Untergang der 'Bugger' ein Stück weit wieder gutzumachen.

Im Zeitalter des 'Kampfes der Kulturen' (Samuel P. Huntington) ist 'Speaker for the Dead' sowohl ein brilliant geschriebenes, als auch ein hochgradig aktuelles Buch. Es führt ?Enders Game? nicht nur fort, sondern hebt es auf eine höhere Ebene.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymer Hörer
  • 25/05/2018

Unglaublich Gut!!!

Eine absolut faszinierende und tiefe Geschichte, die einen hervorragend unterhält und gleichzeitig in intensives Grübeln versetzt.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Anna Pribasnig
  • 15/05/2018

Incredible Story

While everyone seems to talk about Ender’s Game, this book really stands out for me as the real story of Ender.
Ender’s Game is a prequel and a very good one at that.
The speaker for the dead has incredible parallels to our time, even though it was written in the 80s.
I think this just became my favorite book.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Kunde
  • 11/02/2018

Pursuing a wonderful thougt

Orson Scott Card says that he just wrote Enders Game as a preface so he could pursue his idea of the speaker for the dead. In this book we meet Ender in a mission for peace between several alien species in his role as a speaker. There is no shot fired in the entire book and only three people die. But the story ist among the best, deepest and most thoughtfull i read in my live. Now I will directly continue with children of the mind.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • thomas stark
  • 04/11/2015

Perfect sci fi

While many regard Enders Game as the better book, i really enjoyed speaker a little more. It's more philosophical and asks great questions.

Both books really got me excited for the next books in the Ender universe.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Konstantin Hristov
  • 08/05/2015

Just wow

Read it and weep, rejoice and continue to gobble up card as if he were mana in a desert