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    Description

    A New York Times notable book of 2020

    From the best-selling author of Nixonland and The Invisible Bridge comes the dramatic conclusion of how conservatism took control of American political power.

    Over two decades, Rick Perlstein has published three definitive works about the emerging dominance of conservatism in modern American politics. With the saga's final installment, he has delivered yet another stunning literary and historical achievement. 

    In late 1976, Ronald Reagan was dismissed as a man without a political future: defeated in his nomination bid against a sitting president of his own party, blamed for President Gerald Ford's defeat, too old to make another run. His comeback was fueled by an extraordinary confluence: fundamentalist preachers and former segregationists reinventing themselves as militant crusaders against gay rights and feminism; business executives uniting against regulation in an era of economic decline; a cadre of secretive "New Right" organizers deploying state-of-the-art technology, bending political norms to the breaking point - and Reagan's own unbending optimism, his ability to convey unshakable confidence in America as the world's "shining city on a hill". Meanwhile, a civil war broke out in the Democratic party. When President Jimmy Carter called Americans to a new ethic of austerity, Senator Ted Kennedy reacted with horror, challenging him for reelection. Carter's Oval Office tenure was further imperiled by the Iranian hostage crisis, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, near-catastrophe at a Pennsylvania nuclear plant, aviation accidents, serial killers on the loose, and endless gas lines.  

    Backed by a reenergized conservative Republican base, Reagan ran on the campaign slogan "Make America Great Again" - and prevailed. Reaganland is the story of how that happened, tracing conservatives' cutthroat strategies to gain power and explaining why they endure four decades later.

    ©2020 Eric S. Perlstein. All rights reserved. (P)2020 Simon & Schuster, Inc. All rights reserved.

    Ce que les auditeurs disent de Reaganland

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    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Nathan D. Backlund
    • Nathan D. Backlund
    • 07/09/2020

    This Book is Censored by Audible

    Several times in the book the “n word” appears in quoted remarks. Audible seems to think think the listeners are too sensitive to hear this word, even in context. Instead they replace the word with a short tone. It’s a disservice to the listener and a disservice to history. If you’re that sensitive don’t read history. There’s a lot of ugliness in human history. It’s not going to be changed by a narrator not saying the bad word.

    53 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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      2 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour R. Herz
    • R. Herz
    • 20/09/2020

    Should have been great

    Perlstein does great work — his Nixonland was a landmark, tremendous and valuable irrespective of your politics. This book, though titled "Reaganland," is about almost everything but until you get near the end, where it gets unfathomably sketchy on RR, and meanwhile the "everything" that fills the rest is an overbalanced very left view of the world and the country. The research here is formidable, of course, which is what we expect from this author. But — to slightly modify Philip Roth's wonderful quote — "He knows everything. It's too bad he doesn't know anything else."

    10 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • aaron
    • 17/09/2020

    Outstanding Poli-History of the Mid-Late Seventies

    This is a very detailed political history of the mid-late seventies, culminating in the election of Reagan. It bogs down a few times (e.g. at various conventions/rallies) in the type of minutia that would put even the most hardcore of political history fans to sleep. I couldn't bring myself to deduct a star for this, simply because the amount of research that must've been involved to include such minutia is something to be applauded. Just be assured, you are going to get less of a fast-moving story, and more of a glacial data dump.

    Some people enjoy that, I guess.

    For some reason, a particular word is beeped out, even though it's used in perfectly clear and historically-relevant context each time. No one should accept this. It's childish and nanny-state and highly insulting to the listener. The word was spoken back in the 70's (in this context) by certain quoted individuals, but for some reason, my delicate ears can't be subjected to hearing this word, so I have to hear a harsh, loud, annoying BEEP instead.

    That's just silly.

    8 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Tad Davis
    • Tad Davis
    • 27/10/2020

    Brilliant

    Ronald Reagan doesn’t come off well in this book, to put it mildly. It’s hard to take him seriously as a hero, politician, or President after reading it. His intellectual grasp of issues was limited, and his view of the world was simplistic and schematic. Yes, he was a great storyteller, but as it turns out many of the stories he told, even about himself, were badly remembered or simply made up.

    He’s not the only one who comes off badly. I’ve been a big fan of Jimmy Carter all my life, but Perlstein’s account of his Presidency has forced me to rethink much of that. One of his most frequent blunders, according to Perlstein, was going public with a policy without consulting any of the Democrats in Congress first — finding out only after the fact that most of them were opposed. Or, flipping the coin, suddenly abandoning a policy after finally getting Congressional leaders to get behind it — and letting them find out about his change of mind from the news media. Carter’s administration did not play well with others.

    It was a turning point in American politics, a period when opposing sides on various issues — from taxes to gay rights — hardened into moral crusades. Jerry Falwell, Pat Robertson, Phyllis Schlafly, and the NRA all date their growing national influence to this period. Perlstein’s brilliance as a reporter is to go deeply into well-researched and meticulously documented detail and yet still maintain the momentum of the overall narrative. I’ve read the other three books in this series, and now I want to read them all again.

    There are four narrators, one for each year — 1977-1980 — each year being a separate section in the book. All are good, and the variety helped, given the length and the detail of the narrative.

    As someone who lived and voted his way through this period, I can say with conviction: if you want to know what it was like — or you want to be reminded what it was like — read this book. Better still, read all four books in the series: you will come away with a better understanding of American conservatism and the people who have made it such a dominant force in our national life in the 21st century.

    7 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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      4 out of 5 stars
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    • Peter
    • 26/01/2021

    Great but held back by the actual history

    Another great entry but not quite as good as the previous entries of Nixonland and The Invisible Bridge, largely because the scope of the story focuses so much on the cultural war issues of busing, LBGTQ rights, and abortion.

    This is no fault of the author as it is simply reporting on the decisive issues of the day, but such issues are (and remain) much more morally draining to listen to than the other issues outlined in previous books (Vietnam vets infighting, the gold standard, price controls, the Moonies, labor unions, Watergate Babies, the ERA, the and more).

    Best highlights: The rise and fall of the consumer protection movement, the consistent misfunctionings of the "Georgia Mafia" under Carter and their conflicts with fellow Democratic compatriots, and the in-depth look at Jimmy Carter's soul-searching and media disappearance that pre-empted the infamous "Crisis of Confidence" speech.

    Least great highlights: Ronald Regan himself is actually quite boring. He appears to be a fairly vapid individual blessed with charisma and divine mission to be the vector of the conservative right. In practice, he ended up riding the tide more than causing the tide it appears.

    Overall, this was good, but I reckon Nixonland and The Invisible Bridge were both better, with The Invisible Bridge being my favorite in the series that started with Before the Storm (which I have not read). Your mileage may vary.

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • John Henry
    • 26/10/2020

    Brilliant

    paints a vivid structure to a turbulent decade. how the right was born. instead of a series of independent events a coherent picture of the cauldron in which the evil forces of modern conservatism and neo liberal capitalism were formed . an indictment of Carter.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    • Global
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    • jeff lewis
    • 25/10/2021

    essential

    once again, essential reading for understanding the world today. Perlstein's fly on the wall history let's you feel right in the moment

    • Global
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    • SSBooks
    • 22/08/2021

    Reaganland

    A well researched work outlining the efforts of the conservative movement in the United States to influence the 1980 election. Perlstein illustrates in great chronological detail the political climate of an era marked by a pivotal election.

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Milosh
    • 03/08/2021

    Very well researched but...

    I loved it . Extremely well researched . Some people may be turned off by leftist bias of writer but it didn't bother me because you can clearly differentiate between historical events and periodical personal preferences of author

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    • Robert
    • 15/06/2021

    Amazing book

    This is one of the best pieces of history I have ever read. Rick Pearlstein is an amazing writer because he illustrates political history within the context of social and cultural forces. His books are full of engaging anecdotes to illustrate the ideas that he is explaining. The result is history it is impossible to put down. I highly recommend this. I think he is at least as good as Robert Caro - And I love Robert Caro!