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Data and Goliath

The Hidden Battles to Capture Your Data and Control Your World
Lu par : Dan John Miller
Durée : 9 h et 27 min
Prix : 23,49 €
9,95 € / mois après 30 jours. Résiliable à tout moment.

Description

Data is everywhere. We create it every time we go online, turn our phones on (or off), and pay with credit cards. The data is stored, studied, and bought and sold by corporations and governments for surveillance and for control. "Foremost security expert" (Wired) and best-selling author Bruce Schneier shows how this data has led to a double-edged Internet - a Web that gives power to the people but is abused by the institutions on which those people depend.

In Data and Goliath, Schneier reveals the full extent of surveillance, censorship, and propaganda in society today, examining the risks of cybercrime, cyberterrorism, and cyberwar. He shares technological, legal, and social solutions that can help shape a more equal, private, and secure world. This is an audiobook to which everyone with an Internet connection - or bank account or smart device or car, for that matter - needs to listen.

©2015 Bruce Schneier (P)2015 Recorded Books

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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jeremy
  • 12/06/2015

Great information

I work in the IT world and I knew a lot of this was going on. This book really helped understand a lot more of what is going on with data collection and what we can do about it. It is a very interesting read.

8 sur 8 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 03/10/2016

Repetitive

This is an extremely important topic and I was looking forward to listening to this book.
However, I am not impressed with the writing so far. It is very repetitive - the author drives home the same point over and over again using multiple examples. It does get on one's nerves.
I am disappointed and will be looking for other books to inform myself.

4 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 30/07/2016

A great book for our time!

Overall loved it. Great examples and sources for follow up. Schneier's text reads more like a peer reviewed work than a run of the mill book. He methodically outlines his thesis, which falls somewhere in the middle of perfect privacy and perfect surveillance. Carefully enumerating the reasons why his approach is both morally correct and practical to apply. Regarding the latter he builds on the work of others in outlining a true course.

I used the bookmark feature to note the many memorable moments in the audiobook. From references to Japanese internment and McCarthysism to the logical summation from FDR the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

This was my first audiobook. The narrator's voice was crisp and welcoming. I started the book last night and finished it this afternoon, thanks to both the subject matter, style of writing and clear articulation. Another note for users of the audible android app is to try the speed playback. I initially started at 1.0x, by the middle I was able to play at 2.0x and gradually increased until I got to 3.0x. For most of the time I was listening to the book I was also multitasking doing household chores. I hope all the narrators are as good.

4 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Reggie
  • 14/04/2016

Great but 2 hours to long

Great for understanding how data is collected and can be used. Skip the last 2hrs.

3 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Michael R. Books
  • 08/09/2015

Really enjoyed

Much more understanding and appreciation of how services collect and use our data. Also, will no longer use Goggle

3 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
  • Gary
  • 22/09/2016

Lots of facts, needed a narrative to not bore

I love the topic. I love the details provided in this book. But, to tell a story you need more than a great topic and a bunch of facts. One needs a narrative and an attitude to tie the pieces together. This book lacked the story telling 'je ne sais quas" (literal: "I don't know what", but figuratively "elusive quality") though he does have the attitude.

I don't think there is any current topic where I could be more interested in than along the lines of the merging of the data that is out there with computers and algorithms, and I would consider Edward Snowden a hero, because what we have learned from him and the potential to do harm (as well as good) with the merging of big data with computers and the power of using context and content that both government and corporations (and even private citizens) can use against us (or for us) as a potential threat to our liberty or a boon to our equality. Complete liberty means no equality, and complete equality means no liberty. There is a balance and books like this can offer a guideline, but it needs the story to tie the pieces together with a narrative of some kind.

I'll give an example, of a book that I just recently read. "Rise of the Machines", by Thomas Rid. He covers many of the same topics that were covered in this book, especially on the part of encryption and PGP (pretty good privacy). At the same time that book always had a theme woven into the story as a whole in which he was tying all the pieces together, and even summarized them in the final chapter for the dense reader like me. This book, "Data and Goliath", doesn't interweave them coherently and therefore made what should have been an incredibly exciting story for me into a dull story with a lot of facts.

My problem with this book is not that it didn't give the listener plenty of details, but it didn't give the listener an easy story to tell so one can, for example, share with colleagues over the water cooler while at work. The values we use to explain the world through science would include: simplicity, accuracy, prediction, fitting in to the web of knowledge, and lastly the ability to explain. In order to explain, one needs a story to put the pieces together this book doesn't offer that. (Galileo had a story to tell as well as plenty of details. Read "Dialogs Concerning Two Chief World Systems", e.g.).

I'm in the minority on this book. It gave me details which I loved, but it lacked a over arcing narrative that I could wrap my mind around. Good fiction needs a story to hook the listener, and non-fiction needs that narrative even more as to not bore. I like all genres of non-fiction except for the boring kind.

6 sur 7 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Blue Architect
  • 10/08/2015

Data Collection for Dummies

Book offers a comprehensive research pertaining to ubiquitous mass surveillance, commonly referred to as Dataveillance. The topic is not only relevant to those with an interest in Data collection, but any person concerned with the erosion of privacy.

6 sur 7 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Luther Cline
  • 21/05/2015

Always good material from Bruce

This book has so much quality material, it is a must read if you really want to know what is going on.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • UK
  • 21/04/2015

Two thumbs up

Informative, solution focused and practical. Draws attention to very obvious ways we all leave data trails. Suggestions for policy changes without resorting to histrionics or scare tactics.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • S. Yates
  • 28/06/2017

Solid, slightly annoying narration

What about Dan John Miller’s performance did you like?

Miller was clear and easy to follow. However, something about his delivery was a bit too singsong, and grated on my nerves after a while.

Any additional comments?

Solid book. Nothing new (in that if you have read widely on privacy and cyber issues, you likely have had most of this covered), but if you need a primer, you could do worse. Caveat: Schneier has definite opinions on the proper course of things, on the rightful balance between security and privacy, and his opinion is not tempered. He does not really set forth everything objectively to let the reader make up their own mind (this isn't hidden, so isn't as problematic as it could be). I typically prefer books that are a bit more balanced, but on the plus side Schneier is able to take complex technical information and make it easily digestible to lay audiences, the overview is wide but too long, and a reader leaves fairly well-informed about the basic issues related to data in the modern world.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.