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    Description

    Have you ever thought about the creative process that boiled inside geniuses like Mozart, Beethoven, Dvorák, Strauss, Brahms, Mendelssohn, or Liszt - or any composer, for that matter?

    What goes through a composer's mind when a musical composition is being set to paper? Are those magical weeks or months spent in an agonizing creative blur of ideas first tried and then discarded, or is it a matter of pure inspiration? Does the composer hear the music in his head before even picking up a pen, or does the music in fact begin on that blank sheet of staff paper? Most important, can lay listeners like us, untrained in music's technicalities, learn how to open our ears to a composer's creative intentions?

    Happily, the answer is a resounding "yes!" And in this series of 32 lectures, a professional composer and accomplished teacher will give you a new level of sophistication as a music listener - using as his teaching tools some of the most memorable works in all of music, by geniuses whose work has not only withstood time, but transcended it.

    Through listening to these lectures, you'll gain a new grasp of the intricacies of musical purpose, structure, and narrative content that you will then be able to hear in any piece of music. And though this is a demanding course, with a deeper look into musical structure than untrained listeners are likely to have experienced, it is not an intimidating one. Professor Greenberg vividly positions each composition and its composer in the social and musical fabric of its period, so you can understand the music in its proper societal and artistic context and feel its emotional power in the same way as did its original audiences.

    PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your Library section along with the audio.

    ©1995 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)1995 The Great Courses

    Ce que les auditeurs disent de Concert Masterworks

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    • Kindle Customer
    • 09/11/2014

    Down the rabbit hole with Dr. G!

    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?


    My first attempt to break into the world of really enjoying music came when my husband bought. The Concert Masterworks. Until then, I knew my favorite music was Bach’s and Mozart came second and Beethoven and Vivaldi and Teleman were in there somewhere. I was pretty much a Baroque girl. When I listened to the first two lectures, I realized I was missing a lot. So, I got the How to Listen and Understand Great Music. Loved it. Listened until I got to the Classical Period and went back and did Bach and the High Baroque. Then on with the Classical Period--which I have not finished yet because I did Great Masters: Mozart and am about to start The Concerto. And then, either The Chamber Music of Mozart or The Symphony. I am enjoying Dr. Greenberg’s expertise and attitude so much that I keep diving down new rabbit holes!

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    • eddie
    • 18/11/2013

    ERA OF TRANSFORMATION CLASSICAL-ROMANTICISM

    Would you consider the audio edition of Concert Masterworks to be better than the print version?

    Absolutely yes...it is essential to "...get it in our ears," says Professor Greenberg, as he teaches the thematic development in various forms of composition, he walks us through each work playing key parts, as if sitting at our side discovering the original intentions of each great master he reviews. Audio lends itself very well to great learning enjoyment...I augment the lessons by listening further online to entire works Dr. Greenberg introduces.

    What was one of the most memorable moments of Concert Masterworks?

    The section on Paganini and Franz Liszt...the influence of mastering technique to the extreme capability of an instrument and the inspiration of virtuoso on generations centuries forward was fascinating...one could then see how musical composition became transformed to accommodate the extremes in performance.

    Have you listened to any of Professor Robert Greenberg’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    Yes...Mozart: His Life and Music...in contrast, Concert Masterworks was much broader in scope covering select works of many great composers spanning from and including Bach, Haydn, and Mozart's era through the 19th century, Beethoven, Chopin, Paganini, Brahms, Liszt, Dvorak, and into the early 20th century, Strauss, Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff. Dr. Greenberg does give attention to biographical details as well as social cultural changes as they influenced changes in compositional and thematic forms in music.

    If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

    Change We Can Believe In

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    • Andrew
    • 05/11/2013

    A great way to add to your concertgoing experience

    This is the best credit I've spent in a long time. Rather than just providing technical details and historical context, Professor Greenberg explains exactly what another composer would be listening for in each of these works. The result is eye-opening, even for someone who regularly attends orchestral concerts.

    If you've listened to Professor Greenberg's "30 Greatest Orchestral Works" in the same series, Concert Masterworks is deeper and more engaging in every way.

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    • Mike
    • 10/03/2016

    Encore The Great Courses

    After completing the courses I felt like rushing out to buy a piano and restart my playing career which ended 60 years ago.Professor Greenberg is a Master in all senses of the word and I recommend this series to any and everyone who has the slightest Interest in Classical music.Bravo

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    • Utilisateur anonyme
    • 19/06/2018

    Mr. Greenberg does much better than this

    This is the 4th Mr. Greenbergh's book I got from the Great Courses and the 1st one I dislike. The performance is not that good and the time spent on information he repeats on other books make this one unworthy for me.
    By the way... I truly recommend "How to listen to and Understand Great Music" as well as "The Concerto" and "The 30 greatest Orchestral Works".

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    • P. Berinstein
    • 21/07/2020

    What a ride!

    Professor Greenberg is always fun but he really outdoes himself in this series. Whether you like classical music or not you will learn a lot and have a ball doing it. Highly recommended!

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    • Peter
    • 27/06/2020

    His loud mouth bloviating becomes so tiresome.

    At first the author is funny and just irreverent. But after several chapters he just appears to be silly, crude, egotistical, and downright offensive. It's just not funny anymore.

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    • Patrice Sieler
    • 23/08/2017

    Extremely well done and exciting

    I was mesmerized from the beginning. Dr Greenberg's presentation and energy carried me along. I learned so much and had fun doing it. His sense of humor was wonderful. Enjoyed every minute of it. Thank you.

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    • Kai Kay
    • 15/01/2017

    Really loved this. Prof. Greenberg Always great.

    fascinating, yet accessible and detailed exploration of some amazing masterpieces with helpful background and humor.

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    • Miles
    • 03/07/2015

    Great series

    This has been well reviewed by others and it is a great series. The only negative is the lack of the supplemental material which could easily be provided but is not. Why the publisher has denied purchasers this material is a mystery. It is technically very easy and would cost nothing.

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    • Norjen
    • 06/02/2020

    A misleading title

    In this audiobook Prof. Greenberg analyses just eight works: 1) Mozarts Piano Concerto No. 25 2) Beethovens Piano Concerto No. 5 3) Dvoraks Symphony No. 9 4) Strauss' tone poem Tod und Verklärung (Death and Transfiguration) 5) Beethovens Violin Concerto 6) Brahms' Violin Concerto 7) Mendelsohns Midsummer Night's Dream 8) Liszts Totentanz (Death Dance) So we have just four concertos, maybe five if we stretch the definition a bit and include Totentanz. My title suggestion: "Eight masterworks for the concert hall" Each part starts with a background lesson, followed by 3 lessons of pure Greenberg magic, a detailed but always accessible dissection and step by step reintegration of the works. The Word Score Guides provided in the pdf are a welcome help and visualize the explanations given to the audio. Unfortunately someone hampered with the order of the measure numbers in all but one of the word scores. In the end I printed these pages and glued them together in the correct order. A last remark: I guess these lessons were initially not planned as one course. Thrice we learn about the meaning of opus numbers, twice Prof. Greenberg gives us in the background lessons a lengthy discussion of Beethovens fifth symphony. But then I thought: "I got four courses for the price of one", and smiled.

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