Gratuit avec l’offre d'essai

Écoutez en illimité un large choix de livres audio, créations & podcasts Audible Original et histoires pour enfants.
Recevez 1 crédit audio par mois à échanger contre le titre de votre choix - ce titre vous appartient.
Gratuit avec l'offre d'essai, ensuite 9,95 €/mois. Résiliez à tout moment.
Acheter pour 23,49 €

Acheter pour 23,49 €

Utiliser la carte qui se termine par
En finalisant votre achat, vous acceptez les Conditions d'Utilisation. Veuillez prendre connaissance de notre Politique de Confidentialité et de notre Politique sur la Publicité et les Cookies.
Les membres Amazon Prime bénéficient automatiquement de 2 livres audio offerts chez Audible.

Vous êtes membre Amazon Prime ?

Bénéficiez automatiquement de 2 livres audio offerts.
Bonne écoute !

    Description

    Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this piercing work distills 3,000 years of the history of power into 48 well-explicated laws. This bold volume outlines the laws of power in their unvarnished essence, synthesizing the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, Carl von Clausewitz, and other infamous strategists. The 48 Laws of Power will fascinate any listener interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control.

    ©2000 Robert Greene and Joost Elffers (P)2015 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

    Commentaires

    It's The Rules for suits.... Machiavelli has a new rival. And Sun-tzu better watch his back." ( New York Magazine)

    Ce que les auditeurs disent de 48 Laws of Power

    Moyenne des évaluations utilisateurs. Seuls les utilisateurs ayant écouté le titre peuvent laisser une évaluation.
    Global
    • 4.5 out of 5 stars
    • 5 étoiles
      44
    • 4 étoiles
      14
    • 3 étoiles
      3
    • 2 étoiles
      4
    • 1 étoile
      1
    Interprétation
    • 4.5 out of 5 stars
    • 5 étoiles
      36
    • 4 étoiles
      11
    • 3 étoiles
      5
    • 2 étoiles
      0
    • 1 étoile
      1
    Histoire
    • 4.5 out of 5 stars
    • 5 étoiles
      34
    • 4 étoiles
      11
    • 3 étoiles
      4
    • 2 étoiles
      3
    • 1 étoile
      1

    Commentaires - Veuillez sélectionner les onglets ci-dessous pour changer la provenance des commentaires.

    Trier par :
    Trier par:
    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      2 out of 5 stars

    Long and repetitive, quite dated

    First of all the book is far too long. With a bit stricter selection and less repetitions it could easily fit in half of the time, with the same message. With every next chapter the conclusions become more and more blurred and inconsistent with the 'laws'. I'd risk that they would perfectly make up 10 laws instead of shady 48 of them...

    The tone of the book suggests clearly that it pretends to be a guidebook, yet almost all of the historical examples date to the events of 5 century BC to early XX, with next to none references to the modern times. It is true that most of the mentioned mechanism never change, but the application of the books laws per se are quite unrealistic in the times where conflicts are not anymore solved with swords and if you are not born a king of XVII century France. It also completely skips the moral part of moves like intentionally killing all your siblings or using your best friends as scapegoats... if one would care.

    As long as I really enjoyed the short historical anecdotes which are really plenty in this book I still don't really see who is the target of it. It is a too simplistic and unstructured to be a resource for any social studies, yet too too old-fashioned and lacking any modern life references to be a popular lifestyle guidebook. It is also neither light nor relaxing to listen, as it constantly tries to be instructional and greatly covers wars and killings. I guess it would make a perfect study for a young prince in XVII century Europe, or if you're a control freak, but not sure how to make it real.

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      1 out of 5 stars

    How to be a sociopath

    The author has dedicated time and effort to mislead people. True power comes from within you, from authentic being, from living life according to your values.

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars

    Riche en enseignements

    À relire plus d'une fois pour capter, et assimiler les leçons. J'aime bien la méthode utilisée pour la transmission du savoir. Reco

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars

    great book! weak story!

    great book, valuable insight to the game of power however chapters don't feel logically connected with a powerful story which makes it harder to remember the context precisely.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars

    Too long

    Too much history telling only to make weird leaders that don’t serve for nothing. Waste of time

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars

    Un incontournable !

    Ce livre est absolument a lire pour toute personne qui souhaite mieux comprendre les relations de pouvoir ! Excellent livre.

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars

    De l'or en loi

    écoutez la version abrégée, la version longue contient plus d'anecdotes et d'exemples historiques. intéressant pour l'analyse historique mais lourd pour étudier les mécanismes de pouvoir

    Trier par :
    Trier par:
    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Gaggleframpf
    • Gaggleframpf
    • 25/02/2016

    You don't have to be a psychopath to like this.

    This is an absolutely amazing book. It will help you to tell your true friends apart from people who just want to use you. It will tell when to give more to your employer, or when to tone down your enthusiasm. It will warn you about going too far in your quest for power.

    If you really are a power-hungry maniac, this book will do just as much to help you reach your goals as it will if you are an average joe with no ambitions. I'm an idealist myself - I like to see the good in everyone and I don't like to think of myself as someone who wants "power" over other people.

    But that is not an excuse to avoid encountering the incredibly valuable information in this book. At the very least, it will keep you from making poor moves that will cause you to fall out of favor with others. At the most, you will be able to spot when someone else is playing "the game" and use their techniques against them.

    I don't like to play the game myself; I don't think power is a game. But I sure as hell like to watch the people who DO live like it's a game spin their wheels as they try and fail to pin me down and make themselves look totally incompetent in the process.

    If you're an honest person and if you think rewards and status should be earned by merit and not by raw power or deception, then your reputation and character will go before you and these laws of power will walk behind you.

    Don't use this book to grow in power for power's sake. This is a fool's errand, and ends in your annihilation. Rather learn the laws of power to attain mastery over your own spirit, and to defend against those who would prey upon your honesty and integrity.

    1 288 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Juan
    • Juan
    • 14/02/2016

    Good Road Listen

    being a trusting person by nature... and working amongst a bunch of sharks. Listening to this has helped me gain perspectives I've never considered.

    287 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      3 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Marlon
    • Marlon
    • 07/07/2016

    Interesting

    As a Christian I find myself struggling with these laws and approaches to power. Maybe I am naive when it comes to power, or too idealistic. This book seems to outline all the dirty tricks played by politicians to stay in power. The author seems to recommend some of the behavior we naturally disapprove of as an acceptable means to power.

    So why did I listen to the whole thing? I thought about returning the book after listening to the first chapter. But I realized that even though I may dislike these "laws of power" they are at play in the world I live in. And even thought I do not believe I will ever live by the majority of these laws, being aware of them has helped open my eyes to what is going on around me.

    So I would not highly recommend this book because there is little emphasis, if any, in character. But the book is useful in pointing out how people acquire and maintain power, and there is a benefit to being aware of how power can work.

    273 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      2 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      3 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour El Barto
    • El Barto
    • 29/05/2019

    NOT a Self Help Book

    Perhaps the best title for this book should be “A Con Man’s Primer” or “The Unabridged Encyclopedia of Selfishness.” An interesting look at cons and power plays throughout history, this book takes a totally amoral look at how to win at all costs.

    While many of the points brought out through history are fascinating (and do provide some insights into what others may be doing to exert control or power over you), I certainly wouldn’t want to use this book as a guide for my life simply because it lacks any substance that would help you create and sustain a “real connection” with another human being.

    I find it interesting that the manuscript quotes several times from the Bible yet teaches a philosophy that is so directly opposed to what is taught there.

    This is a book of contradictions (although it refers to several “paradoxes” of power). One law tells you to take all the credit for performance while another encourages you to give your master the credit. Which is it? Yes, the points are well taken when it comes to these paradoxical principles, but mostly you’re left to ask, “So WHEN do I exercise one law over another one?”

    In summary, this is primarily an interesting historical read. Yes, it could help you recognize times when others may be trying to exert control or power over you, but that’s about where its usefulness stops.

    199 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      3 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Joakim Andersson
    • Joakim Andersson
    • 13/03/2016

    The face of human tragedy smiles

    This book would be easier to enjoy if it were written as a study in how people attain power, rather than a how-to guide. Not once is it the least bit apologetic or remorseful as it urges you on down the road of complete sociopathy.

    At its least harmful, this book merely describes how to pander to the worst aspects of human nature, such as "don't outshine or criticize your master", "don't speak your mind" and just generally "be as fake as possible". And to some extent I can understand this - you do what you have to do, right? It's not your fault if the people around you are judgmental twats or your master is an insecure selfish asshole. And if you wanna attain power in order to change the world for the better, then you can't act like a saint all the time, right? On the other hand, it doesn't just take a strong leader to effect change. The real difference between "better" and "worse" societies lies not in their laws, but in their people. And to attain a society of (intellectually and ethically) better people, it requires people from every social stratum being the best person they can possibly be.

    (Also, improved material conditions are a big factor here, but it's not the only factor.)

    Let's take science, for instance - do we want a scientific community of rational, enlightened people who put the truth above all, who, while having the same kinds of human flaws as everyone else, do their best to overcome these flaws? Or do we want a scientific community where no one speaks up against whatever unfairness or incorrectness they perceive, where everyone is afraid to step out of line? Because that's exactly the kind of attitude that this book promotes (again, at its least harmful). Everyone is a yes man, unless it is in their own selfish interests not to be.

    Also, most people who attain power probably set out to do good, but then end up like everyone else in their position. No one is qualified to evaluate whether they themselves will be better than other powerful people, so the excuse of wanting to attain power so you can do good later doesn't do much to justify the means. I'm not saying you have to be perfect all the time. If you're a politician, just be more honest (or whatever other positive trait) than the politicians around you and reward honesty in colleagues and subordinates (and obviously do your best to not be fooled by fake honesty like this book describes), and you'll have influenced the culture of politics in a positive way.

    Also, this book always assumes the worst about everyone. I think most professors would encourage rather than be offended by criticism from their Ph.D. students, and I don't think they'd be concerned about being outshone. And this book says that arguing for your point of view is a bad strategy because you'll win over some but offend many more, but with people being far more intelligent today than in centuries past due to the Flynn effect, and with modern education encouraging argumentation and critical thinking, I don't think this is true anymore. At the very least it's far less true than it once was.

    The book also says "don't overstep your bounds", and gives an example of a king who had a crown-keeper and a coat-keeper. The crown-keeper's only task was to handle the crown, but he once saw his king sleeping in the garden without a coat, and placed his own coat over the king to keep him warm as it was getting cold. The coat-keeper was punished for negligence, and the crown-keeper was beheaded. Here the book literally assumes the worst. Your employer may be a psychopathic evil tyrant, therefore, never do more than you are assigned to do.

    At its worst, this book explicitly encourages you to commit any horrendous act you can possibly gain power from. Steal, leech off of, and take credit for your friends' hard work! Ruin others' reputation for your own benefit! Sacrifice your friends as scapegoats to save your own skin!

    (Also in arguing for that last thing, it quoted some ancient guy saying "I would rather betray the whole world than let the world betray me" like that guy's a fucking role model. Is the author actively trying to say the most fucked up shit imaginable?)

    Law 15 is "Crush your enemy totally". This might be useful in some situations if you're a medieval king at war, but what if you're running for president of your neighborhood association? Should you crush your rivals completely? Manipulate their kids to hate them, plant child porn on their computer, burn their house down and frame them for insurance fraud? Again, this book is completely unapologetic. It insists that power games are amoral, and never pays lip service to the idea that maybe some things are just fucked up to do. It doesn't say "for medieval kings it was often a prudent strategy to crush their enemies completely". It says to crush your enemies, completely. Out of all the people who have enemies or rivals today, how many do you think are even close to warranted to crush them completely?

    While morally reprehensible to the extreme, this book also has some flaws in its reasoning. First of all there is no empirical data whatsoever. Main points of each law are backed up by anecdote and sometimes argumentation of varying quality, but lots of details are merely stated in a way that sounds convincing without being motivated at all. There was also plenty of advice that appeared contradictory to what had been said earlier

    I get that some things are just very hard to study scientifically, but surely there are plenty of things to be said about power that can and have been studied, and that have plenty of overlap with what is being discussed here. Power has much to do with the human mind and ways in which it is irrational, and there's plenty of data on that that could have been woven into this book. I also get that you can't argue incessantly for every little detail, but at points it feels like the author wasn't trying hard enough. Also, this probably happened a lot more than I noticed, because it's easier to notice the lack of argumentation (or the bad argumentation) when you don't already agree.

    At one point the book said to seem like your success comes from talent rather than hard work, and it motivated this by some seemingly sound but rather arbitrary reasoning. I could just as well make up some reason for the opposite view; you should downplay your talent because it's a lot harder to become talented than hard working, so people will be jealous of your talent but not your hard work. Which of these hypotheses is true probably depends a lot on the culture in as well as your specific situation, so the book shouldn't just authoritatively state "do this" as if it were a general law.

    Still, for all its flaws, this book contains valuable insight into the world of power games, so I do not regret reading it.

    Verdict: 60%, or 2.4 on a 0-4 scale, or 3.4 rounded to 3 on a 1-5 scale.

    191 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      3 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Peter
    • Peter
    • 26/06/2017

    Psychopathy Manual

    This book would be more aptly titled: How to be a Psychopath: Strategies of Manipulation and Deceit.

    It is an entertaining and useful, yet highly disturbing book. Now that I know the true scope of the drive for power, I see the world through suspicious eyes. If you are someone who seeks power at the expense of all else, this historical guide book will likely thrill you. If you are a normal light hearted good natured sort, you may find this book appalling, as it reads like it was written by the devil himself. Yet you should probably listen to it anyway. If nothing else, it will alert you to the strategies of the wolves around you.

    Besides all the rules themselves and the commands to use, manipulate, control, trick and destroy everyone that crosses your path, this book is primarily a collection of historical antidotes. Listening to it will increase your knowledge base of the history of some of the world's most influential power players. It will also help you be alert to such tactics in use in the present.

    The narration of this book was perfect. It could not have been done better. The narrator captured the sadistic domineering feel this book requires to a tee. He was engaging and clear with a very agreeable voice and cadence.

    153 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      2 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour V. Taras
    • V. Taras
    • 12/09/2018

    Interesting stories blur into a useless flood

    As I wrote in my review,

    The book is a compilation of very interesting stories.
    However, after several chapters, all those stories blur into an easily-forgettable flood of dates, names, and facts.

    All you will be able to recall a day later that someone killed or betrayed someone, or lied, or spread rumors, or did something else Machiavellian.

    What's presented as "Laws" is is a collection of random, often mutually exclusive observations. Some people lied to get to the top, some were articulate and said a lot and tried to be in the public eye. Others got to the top by being secretive and never seen in public. Some were generous and that helped them succeed, others were greedy and ruthless.

    The book is definitely worth reading if you just want to hear a bunch of entertaining historic anecdotes. However, unless you're a student of history and know enough history to recognize the names from these stories and put them in context, if you're like most, you'll forget 95% of these stories the moment you move on to the next chapter.

    Treat this book as a great collection of interesting historic stories, but do NOT expect that you will receive a practical advice on how to influence others and achieve your goals.

    150 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      1 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour beavercopa
    • beavercopa
    • 02/06/2019

    Does not resonate with my entrepreneurial goals

    Deceptive intentions are just not my way. I love great business recommendations. Second motives will not accomplish anything and karma is real. I will go back to Brian Tracy.

    145 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      1 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour James Hallberg
    • James Hallberg
    • 03/07/2019

    Machiavelli would be proud.

    great philosophies for evil people. garbage if you have a moral bone in your body.

    120 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour JazzUp
    • JazzUp
    • 18/03/2016

    Learn from lessons from the past. Great narration!

    This book tells a story of lessons that can be learned from examples of things that have happened in history. All of the lessons revolve around a theme of what you should and shouldn't do to put yourself in the best position for power. A little philosophical, but if you enjoy philosophy you will like that piece of it. You don't have to have ambitions of being a power monger to get a lot out of this book. It may make you re-think how you approach things on a day to day basis. It's a little long, but it found it to be engaging and enjoyable the whole way thru.

    113 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    Trier par :
    Trier par:
    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      2 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      1 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Elliemenator
    • Elliemenator
    • 01/09/2020

    Very negative. Narration sounds like a crime story

    The examples in the book do not show a clear application to this time, I am talking about the year 2020. Intrigues by kings and Galileo are being used as examples.This sounds interesting in the beginning, but does not make sense for an application to a life in the 21st century.
    The book seems very negative. The way of thought being taught is negative. It tells you to never trust anyone. Trust your friends less than your enemies. In the first chapter it advises you to never appear charming or superior and basically always to crawl up your bosses a... I am pro positivity and charisma building, this book is depressing and does not seem like something I would do if I want to be a happy and successful person. Yes, it might teach you some manipulation techniques, but it is not easy to understand the corelation between the tools and eg. a career or relationships.

    7 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      1 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour B. Klabisch
    • B. Klabisch
    • 01/01/2021

    Do not read it - it’ll make you sick

    This is like poison. Based on the psychopathic 2% of humanity this book tries to convince you of becoming an amoral, disgusting thing that is so much less than human. It’s criminal that books like this are allowed while ego shooter games or snuff movies are forbidden. Books like these are the source of the negative development of humanity.

    6 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      1 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour 34rufdjckl
    • 34rufdjckl
    • 31/03/2018

    no way!

    please follow these rules when you want to become a psychopath and lose all your friends

    5 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      2 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Dejan
    • Dejan
    • 28/11/2019

    I learned more from this one book than in School

    No one will teach you power dynamics. Simply because no teached them. Also, people will always want something from you. They can disguise it yes, but the truth is different.

    There is a reason, why this book is banned in some prisons in the US. Because it gives people Power!

    3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Alejandro  Lárraga Schleske
    • Alejandro Lárraga Schleske
    • 08/10/2019

    Useful, interesting and fun to listen to!

    Useful, interesting and fun to listen to! What can I add, better just check it yourself!

    3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour simon LE
    • simon LE
    • 12/10/2019

    großartiges Buch

    dieses Buch erklärt anschaulich die 48 Gesetze der Macht anhand vieler Beispiele, es gibt einige repetitive Elemente, die aber das Gesagte nur verstärken. Der Sprecher hat eine sehr angenehme Stimme und der Inhalt ist wirklich spannend. kann ich nur empfehlen.

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Sven
    • Sven
    • 07/10/2018

    Taucht ein in die Geschichte der Macht!

    Ein gewaltiges Werk, was viel Research von Herrn Green voraussetzt. Jedes Machzgesetz ist sehr fundiert herausgearbeitet und anschaulich anhand von Beispielen erklärt. Sehr gelungen, imposant und empfehlenswert!

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      1 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour julio
    • julio
    • 26/03/2017

    waste of time

    exemples from historical periods we know almost nothing. anedoctes from kings and princes from the XVII century. The author thinks that power is that something Machiavelli wrote about. 48 laws with boring stories and bla bla bla. book returned. the book is well read though.

    2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Ahmet
    • Ahmet
    • 21/06/2019

    so much gems

    I learned a lot from this book, great stories and insights. good performance and easy listening...

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      1 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      1 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Numa
    • Numa
    • 30/05/2022

    Disaster

    I wouldn’t call this a book. It’s disgusting to read about all these “laws”. It’s an anti-book.
    If you still want to read it, just try to not follow the advice to stay a HUMAN.