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When China Rules the World

The End of the Western World and the Birth of a New Global Order
Lu par : Scott Peterson
Durée : 16 h et 33 min
5 out of 5 stars (1 notation)

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Description

According to even the most conservative estimates, China will overtake the United States as the world's largest economy by 2027 and will ascend to the position of world economic leader by 2050. But the full repercussions of China's ascendancy - for itself and the rest of the globe - have been surprisingly little explained or understood.

In this far-reaching and original investigation, Martin Jacques offers provocative answers to some of the most pressing questions about China's growing place on the world stage. Martin Jacques reveals, by elaborating on three historical truths, how China will seek to shape the world in its own image. The Chinese have a rich and long history as a civilization-state. Under the tributary system, outlying states paid tribute to the Middle Kingdom. Ninety-four percent of the population still believes they are one race - "Han Chinese." The strong sense of superiority rooted in China's history promises to resurface in 21st century China and in the process strengthen and further unify the country.

A culturally self-confident Asian giant with a billion-plus population, China will likely resist globalization as we know it. This exceptionalism will have powerful ramifications for the rest of the world and the United States in particular. As China is already emerging as the new center of the East Asian economy, the mantle of economic and, therefore, cultural relevance will in our lifetimes begin to pass from Manhattan and Paris to cities like Beijing and Shanghai. It is the American relationship with and attitude toward China, Jacques argues, that will determine whether the 21st century will be relatively peaceful or fraught with tension, instability, and danger.

When China Rules the World is the first book to fully conceive of and explain the upheaval that China's ascendance will cause and the realigned global power structure it will create.

©2009 Martin Jacques (P)2009 Gildan Media Corp

Critiques

"A convincing economic, political and cultural analysis of waning Western dominance and the rise of China and a new paradigm of modernity. Jacques takes the pulse of the nation poised to become, by virtue of its scale and staggering rate of growth, the biggest market in the world...As comprehensive as it is compelling, this brilliant audiobook is crucial listening for anyone interested in understanding where the we are and where we are going." ( Publishers Weekly)

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Global

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  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • David Blake
  • 04/01/2010

Lucid explanation of global economic trends

Jacques' book's lucid prose and textbook explanations of global economic trends is a welcome addition to the growing literature on the rise of East Asia. Jacques focuses on China as he analyzes the rise of East Asia and the competing modernities of the 21st century.

Scott Peterson's narration is sped up and edited, which compresses the content for a faster listen. I enjoyed this. What I did not enjoy, however, is that Peterson made ZERO EFFORT to PRONOUNCE CHINESE, making most words unrecognizable. It would have taken Peterson maybe an extra hour of work to learn the fundamentals of pronunciation as Simon Vance did for his narration of Lost on Planet China. Peteron's lazy, ambiguous pronunciation will be extremely frustrating for anyone with even a cursory knowledge of China.

5 stars for solid content. 2 stars for sub-par narration and lazy pronunciation.

14 sur 14 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Chris Reich
  • 27/04/2011

Excellent, Even Handed

I doubt I could be as even handed as this book. It really made me stop to consider the inevitability of China's rise to the top and how our acceptance of this or not will well determine our fate as Americans. Falling to second is never pleasant but it will happen and sooner than we think.

Will it be a soft landing or hard fall? Depends on whether can accept what is going to happen with grace.

Painful but very, very well expressed. I highly recommend this book.

7 sur 7 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • 01011000
  • 02/03/2010

Its gets better

This book is way too long and would have benefited greatly from the eye of an editor. First, they could have removed all references to the word "inconceivable" which would have reduced the length of the book by a good 10%. Removing duplicate sentences could have reduced it by a further 35%. Elimiating the inane anecdotes would have cut a further 15%. It would still have been a bit a long winded.

However for those willing to sit through the 16.5 hours, it is quite illuminating and in the 2nd half, things do start to come together in a compelling way.

12 sur 13 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
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  • DEXTER C. PHILLIP
  • 17/04/2017

Find another narrator, please!

The narrators, voice, accent, rhythm, and miss pronunciations of words was quite irritating. I often wanted to turn them off or switch to another narrator. The book was well written and had a lot of great information theories history etc. I enjoyed the
book but not the narration.

3 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Godfree Roberts
  • 19/11/2016

Comprehensive and Gracefully Written

Martin Jacques manages to make a scholarly work not just readable but thoroughly enjoyable. Highly recommended as an introduction to modern China.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Fkrauss
  • 25/09/2012

Great Audiobook

Great audiobook! It tells in every aspect one can imagine how the global geopolitc power is shifting from the west to the east, specially to China and how that affects the western way of life.

It is a required book to understand the current situation of the planet and many major discussions like climate, technology, entrepreneurship and specially, Democracy

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Les
  • 19/01/2010

Disappointing

This is an interesting topic, but the story is not told in an interesting or lively way. The author uses a lot of dubious statistics such as the GDP of China and India in the 18th and 19th century. These are both hard to take seriously and dull. Also, the cultural analysis about China, the US and Japan sound cliched and uninteresting.

6 sur 10 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • T. Tsai
  • 24/11/2019

Do your homework

So many mispronounced Chinese terms that it makes it hard to follow the narrator without a book. While I empathize that Chinese isn't the narrator's native tongue, the fact that they don't even sound close to the actual terms shows he didn't really do his homework (e.g. pronouncing the dynasty Qin as "chin" is passable but as "kin" is confusing). I don't think the author would approve as well.

The content by Jacques is great. Just buy the book and avoid the audible version

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Chulanga
  • 17/10/2019

Very Interesting Topic but it's Outdated

It was not easy to finish this book. However it helped immensely to understand Chinese mindset and culture. As this subject is very active, I think the current edition of this book is very much outdated.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
Image de profile pour CHET YARBROUGH
  • CHET YARBROUGH
  • 10/03/2016

CHINA

Even though Martin Jacques’ book, When China Rules the World, has some interesting details, it fails to convince one that China will rule the world. The provocative title drives the bus but it does not reach its destination. His overview of the geo-political and Realpolitik relationships of the east and west are enlightening. But, world control is a myth that causes war and destroys “the best and brightest” of cultures that believe in it.

Never the less, what is happening in China is remarkable. China’s transition from Maoist communism to capitalist communism is like a caterpillar becoming a butterfly; i.e. China has wings but it still lives in a world constrained by its environment.

Jacques’ book exposes some of the cultural biases of China that are not widely known. His suggestion that discrimination is as prevalent in China as it is in the United States is reprehensible and disgustingly familiar. Globalization is real; however, human nature is immutable. All mankind travels on the same space ship, earth. At the very least, China is proving that our environment is fragile and natural resources are finite.

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  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Arnaud
  • 21/06/2016

Good Introduction for beginners

As a former editor for a communist newspaper, Martin Jacques shows clearly his optimism on China and his pessimism on the western world. If the book is clearly a good introduction to China, it does not show the main problems that china needs to overcome such as an ageing population, a huge impact of the pollution on public health and GDP, the increase of import of raw material and growing dependence on imported food and finally the internal war in the communist party. For a beginner it is a good overview but for a specialist of the country this book does not bring much value and insight.