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Life After Google

The Fall of Big Data and the Rise of the Blockchain Economy
Durée : 9 h et 38 min
4 out of 5 stars (1 notation)
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Description

You can say goodbye to today's Internet, New York Times best-selling author George Gilder says. Soon the current model of aggregated free content populated with "value-subtracted" advertising will die a natural death, due, of course, to the simple fact that absolutely no one wants to see online advertising. What will tomorrow's Internet look like?

In Life After Google, Gilder takes listeners on a brilliant, rocketing journey into the very near-future, into an Internet with a new "bitcoin-bitgold" transaction layer that will replace spam with seamless micro-payments and provide an all-new standard for global money.

©2018 George Gilder (P)2018 Tantor

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Global

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  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • R.J.
  • 29/09/2018

Good, but a lot of inside baseball

A great look behind the curtain of the past and future of tech. A must read to know what's happening in the world.
But, the author likes writing in a literary form which can make it hard to follow in a non-fiction audio book.

I'm a highly educated researcher that knows 2 programming languages and has years of statistics and economics experience, and there were times that I was lost, because he assumes a deeper understanding of computer science than most people have. Even computer savvy people.
So, this book seems more for people in the tech community than for a general audience. It also helps to have read Mises and other libertarian economists to not get lost.

That said I recommend it. You'll learn a lot.

38 sur 38 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Douglas Sleeter
  • 23/07/2018

Insightful, compelling predictions for the future

This book lays out a perfect case for how the internet is fundamentally broken, how no amount of big data can compensate for bad data, and how security is not a feature to be added on top of software, but instead an architecture that must be built in from the beginning.

Gilder makes the case that #blockchain is the solution to what is wrong about virtually every economic and technological problem the world faces. If you think big data, automation, machine learning and AI are important, beware of #BigBadData. Unless we “fix” the ever growing problem of bad data, none of them can realize their potential.

16 sur 16 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Walter Sobzek
  • 23/10/2018

Author missed the opportunity to write a truly outstanding book


The authors political bias got in the way when trying to make cogent arguments. Many times caims are not supported but instead left to be self evident. This is a pitty as it reduces the impact of other claims made in the book.
At times the book is shoddily researched and got some basic facts wrong, especially when talking about blockchain projects. For example the author talks about “Vitalik Buterin and his company Ethereum”. I would forgive such an inaccuracy in a book about another topic but this books sole purpose is to talk about how blockchain is the new paradigm that will dethrone today’s kings like corporate giant google. One of the main points in my opinion is that blockchain projects can not be classified in the traditional way. They are certainly not companies or corporations but create a “commons” of sorts which for the first time in history allows complete stranger to work together for the benefit of all.

All in all I’d say a missed opportunity to really make the case for life after google, which decentralized take certainly has the potential to displace. The arguments presented in this book are not convincing and barely scratch the surface of how this could come about.

12 sur 13 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

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  • Dennis Getchell
  • 23/10/2018

Very cool, learned quite a bit.

very up to date. when it comes to tech books I like to read the latest documents, this is pretty good.

5 sur 5 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Christopher J. Falter
  • 25/03/2019

Gilder vents his libertarian spleen

Somewhere in this book is some useful information about how Google and its big data fellows in Silicon Valley managed to build profitable businesses, and how some of their profitability could be threatened by new businesses that use a different technological paradigm--blockchain.

To obtain that information, you'll have to endure hundreds of lengthy, unrelated rants about all the people Gilder classifies as egoists and stooges--which is pretty much everyone other than entrepreneurial "Mozarts" who drop out of college to transform Peter Thiel's venture capital into new hardware products. Thus Gilder can fire his rhetorical shotgun in pretty much any direction and find plenty of targets: "officious" government regulators, banks and bankers, Wall Street, educators, software companies, media figures, environmentalists, anyone who doesn't support the gold standard.... The list stretches on and on and on and on.

It seems that everything in Gilder's world is completely binary. To cite just one example: Since the standard educational system does a mediocre job of helping genius entrepreneurs get started, Gilder wants to raze it and start over with a brand new system that pairs venture capitalists with budding young Mozarts. (Gilder loves Mozart.) But maybe there's a middle ground here; otherwise, who is going to educate the hundreds of engineers that Mozart must hire? Who will educate the marketing professionals, accountants, and security professionals to play the symphonies created by Thiel-funded entrepreneurial genius Mozarts? Gilder does not concern himself with these lesser mortals or their needs.

Moreover, in a great twist of irony, most of the useful content that Gilder cites about the history of computing, information theory, physics, math, etc., has been created by tenured Ph.Ds in various academic departments. Gilder's book could have neither the patina of erudition nor the occasional glimmer of insight without the corpus of content created by academicians; yet he never ceases to bash academia.

The fundamental problem with the book is that Gilder wants to live in a libertarian utopia where intermediary institutions like government, education, banking, big data giants, etc. are no longer necessary, allowing the totally free, 100% individualistic flow of capital and ideas to prevail using the "unhackable" (Gilder's word) technology of blockchain. Thus blockchain to Gilder isn't just a useful technology that is complementary to big data approaches and can outcompete big data in some markets; no, blockchain is the sceptre and coin of the libertarian messianic kingdom. Given such a view, it is not surprising that Gilder fails to realize that blockchain can indeed be hacked. For those of you who, unlike Gilder, want to examine both sides of the bitcoin, I present a list of hacks and some related incidents:

* Sybil attack
* DDoS
* Routing attack -> CoinDash ICO, Parity Wallet breach
* 51% attack -> Krypton hack, Shift hack, Gate.io hack, Coinbase block reorg
* Software zero-days -> Parity Wallet freeze, Ethereum DAO hack, Tether hack
* Social engineering -> Enigma pre-ICO scam
* PKI spoofing -> Bitfinex bitcoin hack
* Insecure accounting processes -> Mt. Gox hack

Of course, there are ways to mitigate these attacks by imposing additional cost barriers to liquidity. For example, you could increase the number of confirmation blocks, or store your bitcoin on a hardware device rather than in an online wallet. But these impose trade-offs that could be costly or even unsupportable for many users and situations.

In addition, blockchain imposes very heavy computational costs on every transaction. At its core, blockchain is a means of increasing security by imposing the friction of high energy costs on every transaction. The high energy costs impose a certain barrier to illicit entries. Even though the barrier can occasionally be breached, it is useful for some transactions. However, it is ill-suited for many others. So ethereum is not going to sweep away the existing regime, regardless of Gilder's boosterism.

About half-way through, I could no longer tolerate Gilder's voluble paeans to the gold standard and gratuitous put-downs of anyone who is not a doctrinaire libertarian. Amidst all the noise of Gilderian kerfuffle are some glimmers of insight, but my pain tolerance reached exhaustion. On to the next book. Gilder says the greatest measure of wealth in today's economy is time, and I agree: I will not waste any more of my precious time on his screeds.

4 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

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    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Dennis Hay
  • 17/01/2019

Seriously .. 🤦🏻‍♂️

another short essay with very little substance that has been filled with fluff to make it into book length... using fancy words does not make your ideas better 🤔🤷🏻‍♂️

3 hours i will never get back

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Jeff
  • 01/11/2018

Simply enlightening!

Confirmed my belief that our future is in the crypto chiasm. Democratized systems of truth, trust, and equitable distribution controlled by the people...the new system of the world. Highly recommend to those either in or pursuing a technology career.

4 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Arno
  • 03/08/2018

A lot of facts and history

Great book for refreshing your memory on the history of tech and the possible futures

4 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Orin Rehorst
  • 03/08/2018

for every computer professional and enthusiast

this book is a must-read for every computer professional and enthusiast. it describes a wonderful future of data integrity and the nurturement that it can provide.

4 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Philip M
  • 08/09/2018

Finally a GREAT BOOK on Blockchain

I was beginning to think I was doomed to read Neo-Marxist philosophy over and over like in "The Truth Machine" and "Blockchain Revolution".

This book brought the human spirit back into the discussion and peeled away much of the hype surrounding blockchain to reveal an even better vision.

I want to read George Gilder's previous books!

13 sur 16 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.