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Every Heart a Doorway

Lu par : Cynthia Hopkins
Série : Wayward Children, Volume 1
Durée : 4 h et 44 min
4 out of 5 stars (2 notations)
Prix : 19,46 €
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Description

Eleanor West's Home for Wayward Children
No Solicitations
No Visitors
No Quests

Children have always disappeared under the right conditions - slipping through the shadows under a bed or at the back of a wardrobe, tumbling down rabbit holes and into old wells, and emerging somewhere...else. But magical lands have little need for used-up miracle children.

Nancy tumbled once, but now she's back. The things she's experienced...they change a person. The children under Miss West's care understand all too well. And each of them is seeking a way back to their own fantasy world. But Nancy's arrival marks a change at the home. There's a darkness just around each corner, and when tragedy strikes, it's up to Nancy and her newfound schoolmates to get to the heart of things. No matter the cost.

©2016 Seanan McGuire (P)2016 Macmillan Audio

Critiques

"Seanan McGuire has long been one of the smartest writers around, and with this novella we can easily see that her heart is as big as her brain. We know this story isn't true, but it is truth." [Charlaine Harris, New York Times best-selling author of the Sookie Stackhouse series (TV's True Blood)]

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Notations

Global

  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Performance

  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Histoire

  • 4 out of 5 stars
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Il n'y a pas encore de critique disponible pour ce titre.
Trier par :
  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • tm
  • 12/07/2016

Utterly Moving

You always hope with books, that as you open them they will spread wider than the breadth of their pages and swallow you whole, allowing you to live an abbreviated other life without reservation. This is such a book. The reader seemed strange to me at first but then perfect as she unfolded the story around me like a grown up sized blanket fort. The plot was so novel. So believable a consequence to every childhood fantasy of travel to other worlds. I can give it only the best accolade I am able, that as I listened to it my own world fell away. Artfully written and read.

41 sur 42 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Elisabeth Carey
  • 04/05/2016

Truly a fairy tale for our time

Nancy is the newest arrival at Eleanor West's Home for Wayward Children--in reality, children like Nancy, who have experienced unreality in the form of fantasy-like alternate worlds. They stumbled through doorways that shouldn't have been there, and found themselves in worlds where they felt more at home than they ever had in their "real" homes.

Nancy spent time in the Halls of the Dead, learning stillness, silence, and patience. Nancy's roommate, Sumi, spent time in a "high nonsense" world and is in love with a Candy Corn farmer who is now, she assumes, lost to her. Kade sojourned in Faerie, and was thrown out when they realized he was only biologically female; Kade is a transgender boy. Jack (Jacqueline) and Jill (Jillian) are identical twins who spent time in a horror movie come to life, where Jill fell in love with a vampire and Jack trained to be a Mad Scientist. They all hope to get home again, and they all know their chances are really, really low. But at least they're among people who understand, people they can trust.

Until students start dying. Sumi is killed and her very talented hands are stolen. A girl whose gift is her exceptional eyes is killed and her eyes taken out--very carefully.

Nancy is the new girl, and her roommate was the first killed. Jack is a Mad Scientist. Christopher carries a bone flute with him, and talks about bones dancing. Tension and suspicion rise rapidly, and Miss West and all her students are afraid that authorities will find out and close down the school. They have to find the killer themselves, before they can't hide what's happening anymore.

This is a beautifully well-done story, with very subtle and persuasive character development. It's scary the extent to which I recognize these kids. I swear, I grew up with some of them. They are very much real teenagers, of the kind who don't fit in. Their not fitting in is less the result of their time in imaginary lands, than the cause of it.

It's just a wonderfully compelling story. Recommended.

I bought this book.

18 sur 19 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Michelle Robbins
  • 04/12/2016

It will stick with you

I have read/listened to more of Seanan McGuire, since I originally found this story and I now know that the worldbuilding, the transfixing general concept, is a bit of a hallmark of the author.

Because to be perfectly honest it wasn't the "story" that kept me listening transfixed, it was the characters - and the individual world each held within them. And just that concept itself, that heartbreaking concept, of children pulled into magical worlds - worlds where they finally finally fit - and then years later being tossed back out and floundering for their footing again. Wanting desperately to get back. And not being able to.

Get this. Seriously, it might be short but it will stick with you.

8 sur 8 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Leslie Larkins
  • 17/04/2016

Great new world from Seanan McGuire

I am always thrilled to get Seanan building a new world, but the narration definitely did not help the story and probably harmed it for me. The character voices were, for the most part, not distinctive and the overall reading was very flat. I think I need to read this one to fully enjoy it.

6 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Caitlin K.
  • 09/09/2017

Great story, but off-putting narration

What made the experience of listening to Every Heart a Doorway the most enjoyable?

Relateable characterization

What did you like best about this story?

Very vivid imagination in describing the children's other worlds

Would you be willing to try another one of Cynthia Hopkins’s performances?

I would because I don't think the problem with the narration were her fault, but rather the production. It sounded like the story was being read by a Speak'n'Spell.

5 sur 5 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • S. Yates
  • 26/03/2018

A grim fairy tale

4.5 stars. I thoroughly enjoyed this unique, little book. The story manages to combine the fantastical and ordinary, and is at once peculiar and familiar, ghoulish and whimsical, macabre and heartfelt. Eleanor West's Home for Wayward Children is a place that takes in the youth who have wandered into and then been ejected from other worlds (worlds that fall on a spectrum, or really in directions in four general cardinal directions -- nonsense, virtue, logic, and wicked). No two worlds identical, with wonders and horrors and rules of their own. The students each found secret doorways to these worlds, and such doorways are fickle at best, sometimes appearing only once never to be seen again. We are introduced to these concepts and the school by Nancy. In her late teens, she is the newest student and we see the school through her eyes.

The students, while underpinned by the fantastic, are typical in other ways. There are cliques, rivalries, friendships, and bullying. Though almost every student at the school longs to return to their own worlds, worlds that in many cases are the only ones that feel like home, McGuire uses the otherworldly to explore issues of mental health, belonging, and that cusp between childhood and adulthood. These issues can be made more immediate by virtue of the worlds the students came from. In some, violence was all in the normal course, in others death was embraced, and in every case the students came back fundamentally changed.

The story itself has its gruesome bits -- a string of murders occur and the killer removes parts of each victim for mysterious reasons. The adults at the school have no special powers to protect the students, and there is the mix of fear and accusation as everyone fears where the killer will next strike. Bonds are tested, and the ugliness of human nature highlighted. But even when it is very dark, there is still that bit of whimsy and goodness to keep it from being oppressive. McGuire (who writes under the name Mira Grant when doing SF/horror), strikes a lovely balance of the horrific and the lovely. And unlike her work as Grant, Every Heart a Doorway is lean and fast-paced, with none of the bloat that some of her other books have. I thoroughly enjoyed this strange little tale, and look forward to continuing the series, and the narrator was excellent.

4 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Jennifer Hawkins
  • 12/09/2016

Delightfully delicious and dark

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would recommend these books to people who really like authors like Francesca Lia Block and Allyse Near.

What did you like best about this story?

The uniqueness of the storyline

Which character – as performed by Cynthia Hopkins – was your favorite?

Eleanor. I could really see her in my mind when she came onto the scene.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I probably could but don't have the time for anything like that (unfortunately!)

Any additional comments?

Sometimes in the middle to end of the book, it seems like Cynthia would mix up the voices. But there were so many characters.... so... Anyway, I still enjoyed it greatly :)

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Jan
  • 10/04/2016

The Memories of Worlds Gone By


The children entered their fantasy worlds in different ways. Some left earth through an old trunk with a hidden staircase. Others walked through mirrors or special doors. Nancy slipped into an underworld by crawling through a space between two roots of a tree.

But all of them were sent back to the earth before they became adults, and a home for wayward children is where they meet and share of their fantasy world memories, always with the hopes of one day going back.

This novel has a very original storyline, but was a little too short to execute the story to it's fullest potential.

I love the voice of Cynthia Hopkins. With the slowness of a near- southern drawl, she pulls the reader in with her character consistent narration and timeless vocal quality.

I am hoping this is the first in a series.

Very well done.

7 sur 9 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • D. M. Meyer
  • 09/08/2018

Not what I expected

As a fan of Narnia and Dorothy and Alice, I expected this book to be a little lighter. It was very dark, including murders. It was certainly different! As others have said, the narrator was a bit stiff without much inflection, but it is in keeping with the voice of the girl who tells the story. #DarkFantasy #Dark #tagsgiving #sweepstakes

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Doby-Elf
  • 11/07/2017

Decent Novella

Any additional comments?

I loved the idea of this unique world, characters, and concept. The concept being, a boarding school/aka/ asylum, for children from different portals. The main character, Nancy, comes from a Hall of The Dead World, she's supposed to be cold and silent. While other characters come from Dark Worlds of vampires and mad scientists. It was an interesting premise but the characters felt flat to me.

The book began interesting enough, but at the halfway point it suddenly turns into a murder mystery. It was like all the potential for further character and world development was switched to a crime plot. The crime wasn't interesting or even suspenseful, and it was easy to figure out "who dunn it". There were glimpses of all the fascinating worlds the kids had been to, but a lot of plot holes that were glossed over.
The dialog between the characters was stilted and awkward at times, and I didn't understand what that was all about. It was like the author had checklist next to her computer that she wanted to fulfill: asexuality, trans, gender fluidity, etc. All would have been important and more interesting but not when they're written from a teaching viewpoint as opposed to an organic storyline.
I think if the author had kept her focus on the characters and the world she was creating and had not delved off into that murder mystery, I would have enjoyed this book more. I understood from the beginning it was a Novella, so that makes it even more of a letdown.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

Trier par :
  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • fantasynews
  • 12/05/2016

Tolle Charaktere, coole Ideen - nette Geschichte

Alice fiel durch ein Kaninchenloch ins Wunderland für Bastian Balthasar Bux wird ein Buch zum Portal nach Phantásien.

Die phantastische Literatur ist voll von jungen Weltenwechslern: Kinder, die ein Portal finden, durch das sie aus unserer Realität in eine andere gelangen. Kaum einer stellt sich die Frage, was aus diesen Kindern wird, wenn sie von ihren Abenteuern zurückkehren in ihr gewöhnliches Leben – und vielleicht feststellen müssen, dass sie nie mehr das Land der Wunder und Magie, das sie besucht haben, besuchen können.

Diese Kinder und Jugendliche stellt Seanan McGuire ins Zentrum ihrer Novelle “Every Heart A Doorway“. Bei ihr sind die Weltenwechsler nicht (mehr) die Auserwählten, die sich durch Labyrinthe kämpfen, um ihren entführten Bruder vom Koboldkönig zu retten, sondern die Verlorenen, nach aufregenden Abenteuern gefangen in einer Welt, zu der sie nicht mehr ganz gehören. Außenseiter sind sie, melancholisch oder gar depressiv, zum Schrecken ihrer Familien für immer verändert und irgendwie gebrochen.

Ein Zuhause, das ihnen ermöglicht, ihre Erfahrungen zu verarbeiten und sich – vielleicht – ein neues Leben aufzubauen, bietet ihnen die alte Eleanor West mit ihrer Internatsschule “Home For Wayward Children”. Nancy, die die letzten Jahre in einer Unterwelt der Toten verbracht hat, kommt mit gemischten Gefühlen im Heim an. Verzweifelt hofft sie darauf, hier etwas zu lernen, dass es ihr ermöglicht, in “ihre Anderswelt” zurückzukehren; vermutlich wird sie hier jedoch nur Hilfestellung erhalten, die wahrscheinliche Aussicht zu akzeptieren, dass dies nie geschehen wird.

Was Eleanor West ihren Schülern jedoch vor allem bietet ist, ganz sie selbst zu sein; unter Menschen zu sein, die – so anders sie auch sein mögen – doch ähnliche Erfahrungen gemacht haben. Und so sehr sich Kade, Sumi, Jack und Jill auch von Nancy unterscheiden, so hilft es Nancy doch, sich nicht mehr verstellen zu müssen …

Egal, was Seanan McGuire schreibt, es wandert meist ungefragt auf meine Lese-Liste. Die Frau trifft eigentlich fast immer meinen Nerv. Das ist bei “Every Heart A Doorway” nicht anders, auch wenn ich nicht so ganz in die Lobeshymnen mit einstimmen mag, die man sonst zu dieser Novelle zu hören bekommt.

Die Grundidee ist faszinierend und man muss es der Autorin hoch anrechnen, dass sie diese sehr sorgfältig durchdacht hat und sehr facettenreich präsentiert. Ebenso begeistert bin ich von den unterschiedlichen Figuren, bei denen McGuire sehr darauf geachtet hat, ein breites Spektrum unterrschiedlichster Charaktere abzubilden: wichtige Rollen spielen sowohl eine transsexuelle Figur als auch eine asexuelle Figur, und das Gefühl des Außenseiter-Seins, des sich-selbst-finden-müssens korrespondiert sehr gut mit den Geschichten der “verlorenen Kinder”.

Um die Handlung noch etwas aufzupeppen, geschieht bald nach Nancys Ankunft eine Serie schrecklicher Verbrechen und die Schüler von Eleanor Wests Heim sind hin- und hergerissen zwischen gegenseitigen Verdächtigungen und der Notwendigkeit, zusammenzuhalten, um den Täter zu finden …

Das alles ist ungewöhnlich, innovativ, divers und kurzweilig – und auch wenn mir “Every Heart A Doorway” Spaß gemacht hat, so hat es mich doch nicht so von den Socken gehauen, wie ich das im Vorfeld erwartet habe. Vielleicht lag es daran, dass meine Erwartungen sehr hoch waren; wahrscheinlicher ist jedoch, dass es an der sehr melancholischen Geschichte liegt. Anders als etwa die Toby Daye-Serie, die auch düster sein kann, vor allem aber temporeich und magisch und bunt wirkt, wirkt “Every Heart A Doorway” aufgrund seiner Motive traurig und stagnierend und viel nachdenklich stimmender. Das muss auch mal sein, ist aber natürlich ein ganz anderes Lese-Erlebnis.

Und auch, wenn ältere Leser zweifellos das Buch mit viel Genuss lesen können, so würde ich “Every Heart A Doorway” doch am ehesten als Jugendbuch oder All Ager bezeichnen. Das liegt an der Geschichte, am Thema, am Alter der Figuren – und nochmal Gratulation an Seanan McGuire, dass sie nicht mit falscher Scham auf den Zehenspitzen herumtrippelt, sondern bei einer Geschichte über jugendliche Protagonisten im Internat auch Dinge wie Homo- und Asexualität anspricht sowie das selbstverständliche Masturbieren bei Nacht.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • florentinaminze
  • 09/02/2018

Tolle Idee, langweilige Umsetzung

Die Idee ist wirklich super, aber die Umsetzung ist einfach mangelhaft, was wirklich schade ist. Ich habe tatsächlich zwischendurch nachgeguckt, ob ich ausversehen eine gekürzte Version gekauft habe, nein, es ist die vollständige.
Erst habe ich gedacht, dass Seanan McGuire mit diesem Buch ihr Debut hat, aber nein, sie hat schon sehr sehr viele Bücher geschrieben.
Die Charaktere sind spannend, aber bleiben oberflächlich. Ich finde dieses Buch hätte eine sehr ausführliche Überarbeitung gebraucht bevor es veröffentlich wurde wäre, denn das Grundgeräst ist, wie gesagt, echt gut.

0 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.