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Caging Skies

Lu par : Steven Jay Cohen
Durée : 10 h et 27 min

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Description

An avid member of the Hitler Youth in 1940s Vienna, Johannes Betzler discovers his parents are hiding a Jewish girl named Elsa behind a false wall in their home. His initial horror turns to interest - then love and obsession. After his parents disappear, Johannes is the only one aware of Elsa's existence in the house and the only one responsible for her fate. 

By turns disturbing and blackly comic, Christine Leunens' captivating and masterful novel examines this world of truth and lies, laying bare the darkest corners of the human soul.

©2019 Christine Leunens (P)2019 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Ce que les auditeurs disent de Caging Skies

Notations

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  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Utilisateur anonyme
  • 30/11/2019

A book with two separate personalities

I got this book because of the movie Jojo rabbit which was “inspired” buy this book. I was fully aware that that means it is not a movie about the book, just that the director took the ideas from the book and ran his own direction. That being said I read this in one sitting. It is a book with two distinct personalities. The first half takes it’s cue from “private lives of the master race“ but the second half turns into A drawn out vision of a dysfunctional relationship between two people that you don’t want to know. I’m not sure what the author was planning when she started this book but apparently she decided to take a sharp turn about halfway through and head in a different direction. I am not a literary critic by any means but the best interpretation I can give on the second half of this book is that it somehow represents post World War II Germany but other than that I found it relatively taxing to endure. I found the first half populated by way more interesting characters, but they are all gone before the second half. I am not sure who I would recommend this book to, I would recommend the first half of the book to World War II fiction fans, the second half to Jerry Springer fans. And by the way, The movie is based on the first half…

4 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Erik
  • 25/10/2019

A long road that ends up nowhere

First third of the book is great. Good characters, good buildup. Second third starts to drag. Has a pretty good twist about halfway through, but then the plot starts to drag. Large chunks of time start flying by. Last third was pretty awful. Story was completely off the rails, repetitive, boring, unresolved. Quite a letdown for such a great start. Narrator is good but story not so much. I wouldn't recommend it. Maybe just go see the movie?

4 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Amazon Customer
  • 20/01/2020

An incredibly deep and real story from the heart

The story really feels real and shows so many emotions, I’m only 16 but I can really understand the feelings and my love for ww2 history can really get down and feel as though I’m there because the realism of how they were treated and how they were made to feel. Also being able to see the development of Johannes and Elsa’s personality and their forms of madness, the actual aging of the characters really emphasizes their growth. My outlook of the book really has changed throughout each of the chapters. (Spoilers) after he looses all of his family and is left with only Elsa, it really changed way the story felt. Overall I really feel the story was incredible and felt real. My favorite book as of now.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Alan Patrick Suggs
  • 08/09/2020

The rare instance where the film is way better.

Finishing this audiobook took some real commitment and the payoff was non-existent. I get it, the film was pretty much a completely different (better) story so I was open-minded about the book. Don't waste your time and money.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
Image de profile pour Mel R. H.
  • Mel R. H.
  • 28/08/2020

Don't Buy a Book Without Reading a Synopsis?

No, this is not Jojo Rabbit.

However, it seems like reading up a little background info on it instead of assuming that all film adaptations are faithful to the book and not sometimes just springboards for creative expansions on the more basic ideas from the source—which still need to give credit to source material because that's how intellectual property works—would have helped most everyone complaining about how this "isn't Jojo Rabbit" and nearly ruined their life because of the vast difference in tone.

It's not the author's fault that you were expecting a very different, uplifting story and this was the opposite. You could have returned it when you realized it wasn't “Jojo Rabbit”—no harm, no foul.

That being said, this is a very well-written, unique book. It's not uplifting. It's not happy. Johannes isn't very likeable. He's very flawed.
He was also in Nazi training and war since age 10. In the book, he goes through the Hitler Youth group for young boys then graduates on to the regular Hitler Youth where the idea of choosing Hitler over a loved one is normalized and considered very virtuous. He ends up fighting in the war and loses most of one of his arms and disfigures and paralyzes half of his face.
“Jojo Rabbit” essentially catches Johannes *before* he's endoctrinated to a point of detriment that is never truly reversed by an outside force. Johannes, in the book, is disabled in the war at 15, not 10. He surpasses age 10 by chapter 4.
So, yes, he's not a cutie-pie kid. He's a messed up, immature young man. [MINOR SPOILER:] He essentially remains all but walled off from society along with Elsa after his mother dies. He doesn't finish school. He even staves off getting a job.

It's a very interesting character study. If you don't like those kinds of narratives, no, you won't like this book at all. If you don't like books without a hero, you won't like this book. If you need a happy or decisive ending or a book that spells everything out for you—nope again.
But this IS a good book if you go into it with the right expectations.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Banannie
  • 22/06/2020

A well told story

The story is of a young man's coming of age experience in Austria during WWII. The story is well told and I appreciate the narrator's perfection in German language readings- a difficult task to carry on with throughout the book. I do wonder, however, why there are periodic change in vocal tone at, what seems to be, the beginning of each paragraph. A light, whispered tone to start off, then the normal, relaxed voice. That was the only observation I made as it was a distraction. Otherwise, I really enjoyed the book on my days off from working at the hospital. Thanks.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
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  • Bonnie Tanner
  • 02/06/2020

Good production, poor storyline

While I certainly enjoyed the narrator and the quality of production, this book was not at all what I was expecting. In good literature, the unexpected is often a welcome surprise or an exciting plot twist; in this book, however, I cannot say the same. I feel the author simply tried to fit too much into a storyline that simply did not have the range or flexibility for it. The style of writing was captivating, almost to a fault; I finished the book, but at times I felt my skin crawl as what I anticipated being a historical fiction depicting the confrontation of two diametrically opposed worldview quickly turned into Anne Frank meets 50 Shades of Grey.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Garrett
  • 30/05/2020

The book is not like the movie

I’m not saying the book is bad and is definitely worth a read. Although I was a little shocked by just how vastly different the book is from the most recent film. I’m always a sucker for a complicated character, and Johannes is definitely it.

  • Global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
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  • Blake
  • 05/03/2020

Nothing worth your time here

If you can't say anything nice, don't say anything at all. Go watch the movie instead.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Interprétation
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
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  • Kellikellibobelli
  • 17/02/2020

No Jojo Rabbit.

First: the narrator sounded like he was holding back tears at odd intervals, and was otherwise droll and boring.

Second: This is basically a long, drawn out kidnapping story told from the viewpoint of someone with deluded intentions. The content became nearly unbearable by midway through the book. There's way too much effort spent on minutiae none of it is very interesting. If the intent is to make the reader/audience feel like the imprisoned Elsa, the author has more than accomplished that.

Third: If you came here because you loved Jojo Rabbit, do not bother. The two stories are not the same, and the book will possibly depress you and anger you.

I want my time back.