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  • Blade Runner

  • Originally published as Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
  • De : Philip K. Dick
  • Lu par : Scott Brick
  • Durée : 9 h et 12 min
  • 4,4 out of 5 stars (28 notations)

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Couverture de Blade Runner

Blade Runner

De : Philip K. Dick
Lu par : Scott Brick
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    Description

    Here is the classic sci-fi novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, set nearly thirty years before the events of the new Warner Bros. film Blade Runner 2049, starring Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling, and Robin Wright.

    By 2021, the World War has killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remain covet any living creature, and for people who can’t afford one, companies build incredibly realistic simulacra: horses, birds, cats, sheep. They’ve even built humans. Immigrants to Mars receive androids so sophisticated they are indistinguishable from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans can wreak, the government bans them from Earth. Driven into hiding, unauthorized androids live among human beings, undetected. Rick Deckard, an officially sanctioned bounty hunter, is commissioned to find rogue androids and “retire” them. But when cornered, androids fight back—with lethal force.

    Praise for Philip K. Dick

    “[Dick] sees all the sparkling—and terrifying—possibilities . . . that other authors shy away from.” - Rolling Stone

    “A kind of pulp-fiction Kafka, a prophet.”- The New York Times

    ©1968 Philip K. Dick (P)2007 Random House, Inc. Random House Audio, a division of Random House, Inc.

    Ce que les auditeurs adorent à propos de Blade Runner

    Moyenne des évaluations utilisateurs. Seuls les utilisateurs ayant écouté le titre peuvent laisser une évaluation.
    Global
    • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    Interprétation
    • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    Histoire
    • 4 out of 5 stars
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    Commentaires - Veuillez sélectionner les onglets ci-dessous pour changer la provenance des commentaires.

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    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars

    Very very slow pace

    Good story, although complex towards the end. Very slow reader. This slow pace made me sleepy at times, and so I missed part of the philosophy behind the story.

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Egn
    • 18/09/2020

    Wonderful

    The book adds a dimension to both movies... by situating them in their environment. Strangely, reading the book after watching the movies makes more sense.

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    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
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    • D. ABIGT
    • 29/08/2010

    This is the original Do Androids Dream of Electric

    It has almost no relation to the movie but makes some very interesting points in its own right. In some ways I like it even better than the movie. There is a whole subplot in the book about people needing to care for the remaining animals on the planet only alluded to in the movie with the one line asking if the owl is real. In the book people that cannot afford real animals to take of get electric ones to keep face with the neighbors. The commentary on this and how culty people can be might turn some off but I thought it made the story more relevant to the real world.

    146 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Matthew
    • Matthew
    • 24/04/2012

    Quirky, Ominous, Immersive

    First, rest assured this is a recording of Phillip K. Dick's book Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep and not a novelization of the film. However, this is one instance in which the book compliments the film. Phillip K. Dick, who didn't live to see the film completed but did see production stills and read the script, also felt the film complimented his work: one can add to the appreciation of the other. Having seen the film before reading (or listening) to the book, I feel like I have a better understanding of both and can appreciate each on its own merits.

    On a near-future earth ravaged by the radioactive fallout of the last World War, the remnants of humanity who have stubbornly decided to stay (instead of emigrating to the off-world colonies) occasionally have to contend with androids--escapees from their lives as servants on the off-world colonies. Much of humanity has reached a state of relative peace thanks to a religion based on empathy (sympathizing and then identifying with another), but the androids lack empathy and are thus dangerous to other humans, so its up to bounty hunters like Rick Deckard to find out who is human and who is machine and "retire" the androids.

    Phillip K. Dick's books often have wacky premises, but the reason readers and film producers keep coming back to his work is that he creates a compelling internal logic and structure of feeling for his characters to act within. Deckard comes to question how he defines his humanity and the perils/limits of empathy, for example. This book isn't action-based (although there is some of that), but really based around tense moments (and to Dick's credit, they are tense moments) where Deckard is having crisis of conscience or is questioning who is a real person, who is artificial, and what that distinction means. This led to several moments that put me on the edge of my seat. The ominous atmosphere of post-nuclear earth, the inhuman threat of the androids, and the other strange elements of the story come together to form a quirky but immersive atmosphere for Deckard's inner struggles with himself and outer struggle with the androids.

    I would summarize Scott Bricks typical narrative style in two words: broody and languid. He draws out words and creates an almost hypnotic rolling effect with his voice that is enjoyable if you are in the mood for that. Brick doesn't read, he performs, but that performance may not be to everyone's taste (so do listen to the sample clip). Still, it fits well with this book: his almost melancholy narration highlights the gloom of post-nuclear Earth and the broodiness of the characters themselves.

    126 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Ian C Robertson
    • Ian C Robertson
    • 09/05/2012

    Asking the important questions 50 years on

    Philip K Dick is one of the most overlooked writers of the mid 20th Century in my view. He has continually asked the interesting and disturbing questions about what is reality. In this, his best known book (albeit known to most under this title and not its more accurate and provacative release title, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?") he asks it with a callous disregard for the answer, so long as it is the truth. Sometimes the truth hurts and bad things need to be done; Dick doesn't shy away from either.
    I enjoyed listening to this for the bit parts, too. A by-product of familiarity perhaps, sometimes text can become banal. Not this text. The entrophy of the society it depicts, and which Scott Brick captures well in his performance, is never lost because the "bits" sustain the whole. JR Esidore (Brick sounding like William Sanderson as F B Farnum in "Deadwood") is a treat. His faltering "chicken head" wisdom is as ironic as it is insightful. Buster Friendly (perhaps a foerunner to the caller in Hunger Games) is annoying but unforgettable. Rachael is beautiful and (as herself and as Pris) callous as can be imagined. And for all of that, Deckard is as complex, and flawed and believable as he was 50 years ago, (30 years ago, when I first read this, at least).
    I think this is an important book. It is a signpost for The Terminator which was to come and a reminder of the ease with which we can slip into genocide, the worship of false idols and belief in our own superiority which has gone, but is never really lost. This is serious and entertaining science fiction for a person who likes to think about why we do the things we do.

    90 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Muddy
    • 20/02/2009

    Pleasantly Surprised

    Great Book. Please understand that you are not getting Blade Runner at all. This book was actually titled Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, and the movie Blade Runner was VERY loosely based on the novel.

    After seeing negative reviews for this book I was a bit dubious, but being a huge fan of Blade Runner I gave it a shot anyway. I was very happy to find that the novel, while being pretty much an entirely different story, was very entertaining and thought provoking. I had never read Dick before and I will most certainly explore more of his work in the near future. The reading by Scott Brick was great as well... as usual.

    84 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
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    • Shawn
    • 25/07/2010

    Odd that there are so many negative reviews

    I found it very strange that there were so many negative reviews on this book and the reader. If you are a Philip K. Dick fan, I don't see how you can react negatively to this reading. The book explores many rich themes that the movie does not have time to develop. I offer the opinion that you could enjoy the movie and the book as two complementary works exploring the same basic question, "what does it mean to be human?". However the book asks other questions dealing with religion and empathy and what they mean in the context of being human. Deckard's epiphany in the desert gets to the heart of the answer. It is this self-exploration of what matters (and what should matter) that differentiates the humans from the androids. This is not Hollywood science fiction, this reading is science fiction from an author unafraid to look into the future and tell us about ourselves as we will be.

    46 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Ryan
    • Ryan
    • 05/12/2015

    Where does man end and machinery take over?

    Audible has misleadingly titled this book "Blade Runner", but it's not a novelization of Ridley Scott's 1982 movie. It's actually the original 1968 Philip K. Dick novel on which the film was based, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" I'm calling attention to this because there are huge differences between the film and PKD's book.

    Though it's been a long time since I've seen Blade Runner, I think the two works complement each other and both deserve to be checked out. The movie has a prescient cyberpunk flavor and a gorgeous soundtrack, while the novel feels more rooted in the upheaval of the late 1960s, with its consciousness-altering "mood organs", empathic religious cult of Mercerism, and themes of post-WWIII environmental devastation. Dick’s undramatic, conversational writing style gives it all a creepy hyperrealism.

    As in the movie, the protagonist, Richard Deckard, is a bounty hunter whose job is to "retire" androids, who have escaped forced servitude on space colonies and returned to an Earth that's gradually sinking into ruin. The androids have been designed with actual flesh exteriors, so they pass for human on cursory inspection. In some cases, they have implanted memories and actually think they're human. The only reliable way to recognize them, short of a bone marrow scan, is to subject them to a test that measures natural empathy, which androids lack. Of course, this is also an issue with some humans, as we come to find out.

    In typical PKD fashion, the story muses about what's "real" and what isn't. A significant theme has to do with the owning of live animals as status symbols, since radioactive "dust" has pushed most species to the edge of extinction. Many people can't afford real animals, though, so manufacturers of fake replicas do a brisk business. There's also an "empathy" device that puts users in psychic contact with a being called Mercer, who might or might not be a hoax. And, at one point, a plot twist calls into question Deckard's own humanity.

    The creators of Blade Runner were probably wise to push the weirder, Dickian stuff out of the story and just focus on the human vs android angle, but I enjoyed Dick's more philosophical vision and the questions he asks about the artificiality of modern human existence. While his ideas of the future are showing their age (we have androids, but still need human operators to connect a phone call?), some of them are prescient. Is sitting at home using an empathy box all that different from sitting at home aimlessly reading facebook? What happens when the fake world overruns the real one?

    This probably isn't my favorite PKD novel (so far, that would be The Man in the High Castle), given that its ideas are no longer as mind-blowing or future-proof as they might have been back in 1968. Still, Blade Runner (the film) remains an important cultural touchstone among sci-fi geeks and the source material is interesting to compare and contrast. Audiobook narrator Scott Brick does a decent job, but he has a tendency to Spit. Out. His. Syllables. Which is a little distracting.

    31 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      3 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Jim "The Impatient"
    • Jim "The Impatient"
    • 02/05/2015

    BUSTER FRIENDLY

    DIAL A MOOD
    PKD has a huge following. If you have already read a couple of Dick's books then you already know if you are a fan or not. This book has the cerebral feel of his work. Dick was a very troubled individual, who was married five times and was clinically mentally disturbed. I only mention this, as his personality comes out strongly in most of his writings. You will never come out of a Dick book feeling uplifted. He was highly intelligent and that also comes out in his work.

    This takes place after World War Terminus. Most of the world has migrated to other planets. The radiation of Earth shortens the life and affects the mentality of the people who have stayed on the mostly abandoned Earth. Everyone on Earth owns a pet to show his empathy. The problem is that most animals are extinct and the ones left are very expensive. Some people have robot animals, as they are much less expensive, but you hide the fact that your animal is not real.

    I prefer PKD's shorter works. The shorter works give you a chance to experience his brilliant mind and innovated ideas on how the future will be, without the hours long depression his books give you.

    I ask the PKD followers to not unhelp me simply cause we disagree. The type of people who like the books I like and dislike the books I dislike, should not waste there money on these books. The PKD followers should get the book. Reviews of differing opinions should be allowed.

    Scott Brick's narration fits the mood of the book.

    26 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Darwin8u
    • Darwin8u
    • 10/12/2013

    Top shelf Philip K Dick

    Top shelf Philip K Dick exploring a tangled web of heavy themes like: what it means to be human, the nature and limits of empathy, love, religion, God, entropy, animals, decay.

    I had mistakenly put off this novel because HELL I already saw the movie. How can you improve upon THAT movie? Well, the book is better. A cliché, certainly I know, but it is spot on with this book. The movie captures a piece of the PKD mad genius, but it is a 2D representation of a 3D Dick. IT is an android, an artificial sheep of a movie that moves, bellows and behaves perfectly but doesn't have the spark the sizzle or the depth of the novel and IT was a HELLUVA good movie.

    Anyway, I'm caught up in a PHDickathon and just ordered a bunch more of his novels off EBay, so I should at least have room to softly land my tattered soul after this amazing novel. Next up? 'Ubik' or 'a Scanner Darkly'.

    26 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Jes_074
    • 01/07/2012

    Greatly Surprised

    Please understand that you are not getting 'Blade Runner' at all. This book should be titled 'Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep', and the movie 'Blade Runner' was VERY loosely based on the novel.

    People tell me that it sucks because their expecting 'Blade Runner' and I think Audible should change the name and stop putting 'Do Androids Dream of Electronic Sheep' in small writing and make it the main title with 'Blade Runner' below it. Its deceptive if you ask me and my explain the low ratings.

    I got this book because someone told me that like 'Dune' the real story was so much better. I listened to this book while a family member read it and we both agree this is much better.

    I almost didn't read this book because someone told it was 'Blade Runner' and I wanted the original book. Glad I didn't listen. Because here we have the details of the story that 'Blade Runner' doesn't give us. Here we get a real feel for what was really happening in the future. We see how unintended consequences of our actions can come back to bite us in the rear. 'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent.' - Salvor Hardin in "Foundation" by Isaac Asimov. If we had learned this then we would not have the basis of this story.

    21 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      3 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Frank
    • 01/02/2013

    The Title Is A Question

    I wish the publishers had just stuck with the original title of this book (Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep?). Although, I understand that sales are most likely increased because of its increased association with the popular movie, Blade Runner. Still, the original title is so much better! It literally poses a question, and it is so satisfyingly frustrating because by the end of the novel, you have no answers; only more questions.

    The questions that this book tackles are difficult, and the way Dick attempts (and just manages to attempt) these questions is well-rounded; topics such as atheism versus theism and reality versus unreality (or perhaps surreality). They're handled with elegance and the beauty of imperfection and incompletion. The attempt to answer only leads to more questions. And such fantastic questions.

    For a science fiction novel, it's also pretty accessible. Dick takes a lot of pointers from the noir and detective fiction genres; there's a lot of satisfying action alongside the difficult, intellectual subject matter.

    As for the audiobook, the narrator is much too slow. Listening to him on 3x speed sounded like the normal speed of most narrators. But he was good, otherwise. Don't let it deter you from listening.

    18 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

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    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Sumanguru
    • Sumanguru
    • 18/01/2021

    Wonderful

    A wonderful story of a dystopian future from the past. Philip truly loved writing this book, it can be felt in every chapter.
    There was no dull moment for me, not once did I want to stop listening to Scott Brick narrating this masterpiece. Perfect impersonification of all the characters, Isador's most of all.
    It was a rather short, but completely full of everything story; of the kind that I love the most.. no true hero, no right or wrong, just another side of the coin.
    I never saw the movies that came from this book, but knew about them. Since I'm a great Audiobook lover, I decided to listen to the book before watching them; great decision.
    I'll listen to this again, no doubt. I recommend it to everyone that enjoys "real" stories about something that could be.

    3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      4 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Amazon Kunde
    • 24/03/2023

    Legendary Sci-Fi

    The movie Blade Runner that is based on this novel I have re-watched many, many times - no other movie ever gave me that desire. Yet, it always felt like there was one thing, a key element, I did not get, even after these many times.

    This book, which has a quite different focus but roughly the same setting/world/story is the answer. I figured out the true, raw cyberpunk nature of it is the key and, in an "alternate universe of the movie" gives backgrounds that one could have never dreamed of with only the movie.

    Great introduction to the corny cyberpunk genre.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Utilisateur anonyme
    • Utilisateur anonyme
    • 07/11/2022

    PKD at its best

    IMO the very best SciFi story ever written... while other authors focus on technology, PKD analyzes the effects the technology has on people (and androids), which is far more interesting and fascinating. A must for SciFi enthusiasts

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Sebastian Stüber
    • Sebastian Stüber
    • 04/05/2020

    Dark but classic

    Supremely read, the story takes you to a depressive future, where you never know for sure what's real.

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • Peter Ritter
    • 19/07/2019

    A must have for every fan of the movies

    When you now the movie ot explains a lot of the Details you dont get at first.

    • Global
      2 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      2 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      2 out of 5 stars
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    • petrik
    • 16/08/2018

    meh

    i guess i expected it to be better. its quite dark. somehow it didnt capture my attention.

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
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    • ren
    • 28/11/2017

    one of the Best books eher writen

    do androids dream of electric sheep is one of the Best Books I ever heard, it's a great recording and it's a must read if you liked the movies, the story is completely different but it's a deep and enjoyable story.
    some parts are predictable, but that's no problem for the story and is not caused by bad plot twist.
    but don't expect the author to explain anything, you need to listen and form your own conclusions.

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Interprétation
      5 out of 5 stars
    • Histoire
      5 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Utilisateur anonyme
    • Utilisateur anonyme
    • 28/10/2017

    tolles und spannendes Hörbuch mach einfach Spaß

    hat Spaß gemacht es zu hören und ich kann weiter empfehlen vor allem wenn man die filme gesehen hat