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Archangel

Lu par : Michael Kitchen
Durée : 11 h et 54 min
5 out of 5 stars (1 notation)
Prix : 22,48 €
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Description

When historian Fluke Kelso learns of the existence of a secret notebook belonging to Josef Stalin he is determined to track it down, whatever the consequences. From the violent political intrigue and decadence of modern Moscow he heads north - to the vast forests surrounding the White Sea port of Archangel, and a terrifying encounter with Russia's unburied past.

©1998 Robert Harris (P)2014 AudioGo Ltd. Published by Random House Audiobooks

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Global

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Il n'y a pas encore de critique disponible pour ce titre.
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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Mike
  • 03/10/2016

Great book. Performance grew on me!

Narrator has quite an update usual style. Wasn't sure if I liked it at first but grew to appreciate his artistic approach. His characters and accents were really good too. Excellent story, quite believable as Harris always seems to be, with a nice "Russian" kind of tone to it, reminded me of Dostoevskij or Tolstoy a little.

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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Starr
  • 03/02/2016

I'd listen to Michael Kitchen read the phone book!

Would you consider the audio edition of Archangel to be better than the print version?

Michael Kitchen (of Foyle's War fame) reads this books so beautifully, sometimes it just made me smile. (Even though there was nothing to smile at in the story.) His narration made even the most despicable characters almost charming--and most of the characters in this book are not especially likeable.

What did you like best about this story?

Considering the book was first published in 1998, just as Putin came to power for the first time, I found some of Harris' predictions for the future of Russia quite prescient.

Which scene was your favorite?

I wouldn't say there was a scene I "liked" best, because the book is about such a dystopian world, most of the scenes are quite horrific. But the writing was so good, you believe it could really have happened that way.

If you could take any character from Archangel out to dinner, who would it be and why?

Most of the characters in the book are not very likeable and I don't think I'd like to have dinner with any of them! However, Michael Kitchen is welcome any time!

Any additional comments?

The only thing I found confusing at times, is the book moves back and forth in time a lot at the beginning and I did get lost a few times and have to go back and listen again. (Not, that that was a hardship--just another excuse to hear Michael Kitchen's melodious voice.) In the printed book there were breaks on the page when this happened, but the pauses weren't long enough in the recording to know, at first, that this was happening.

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • BikerJoe
  • 06/09/2016

Stalin's hand reaches out of the grave

Robert Harris spins a great yarn and this political thriller contains all the ingredients needed to keep you glued to the book. He skillfully blends history and fiction and spices his tale with glimpses of modern Russia. Crime, prostitution and corruption in the glittering Moscow as well as the desolation and poverty of the Russian North form the background to this amazing story.

Robert Harris describes 4 days in the life of Fluke Kelso, a once promising historian with a special interest in Stalin, who was invited to a conference in Moscow on the newly opened Soviet Archives. In a seemingly chance meeting with a former NKVD guard, he learns about a mysterious, secret notebook of Josef Stalin. His obsession with Stalin and his somehow desperate personal situation lure him into a hunt for this notebook. He teams up with the daughter of the former NKVD guard and a resourceful, publicity crazed American journalist to find this notebook and unveil its secrets. The search leads them to Archangelsk on the Northern coast and further into remote and hostile areas of the Taiga. Unfortunately they are not alone in this quest, reactionary forces of the communist era as well as the secret police try to get their hands on the book first.

The scariest part of the book are the excerpts of Stalin’s original interrogation transcripts, which make it so hard to believe that Stalin still is a shockingly popular figure in today’s Russia. Unfortunately this fact adds some credibility to the ending of the story, which to some reader appeared to lack plausibility.

The book is a great read and the only little criticism I have, is the overly negative picture Harris draws of today’s Russia. I do not doubt his understanding of the former Soviet Union and the modern Russia, but as far as prostitution and crime are concerned, Moscow is not so much different from other metropolitan areas anymore and while there is still much to do, the situation in remote rural areas is improving slowly. During my numerous trips to Russia I found the authorities and the police in particular, correct and usually very helpful.

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