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    Description

    What is it like to learn that your ordinary, loving father is a serial killer? 

    In 2005, Kerri Rawson opened the door of her apartment to greet an FBI agent who shared the shocking news that her father had been arrested for murdering 10 people, including two children. That’s also when she first learned that her father was the notorious serial killer known as BTK, a name he’d given himself that described the horrific way he committed his crimes: Bind, torture, kill. As news of his capture spread, the city of Wichita celebrated the end of a 31-year nightmare. For Kerri Rawson, another was just beginning. In the weeks and years that followed, Kerri was plunged into a black hole of horror and disbelief. The same man who had been a loving father, a devoted husband, church president, Boy Scout leader, and a public servant had been using their family as a cover for his heinous crimes since before she was born. Everything she had believed about her life had been a lie.

    Written with candor and extraordinary courage, A Serial Killer’s Daughter is an unflinching exploration of life with one of America’s most infamous killers and an astonishing tale of personal and spiritual transformation. For all who suffer from unhealed wounds; the crippling effects of violence; betrayal; or anger, Kerri Rawson’s story offers the hope of reclaiming sanity in the midst of madness, rebuilding a life in the shadow of death, and learning to forgive the unforgivable. 

    ©2019 Kerri Rawson (P)2019 Thomas Nelson

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    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
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      2 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour M. Waite
    • M. Waite
    • 30/01/2019

    Couldn't Get Through it

    The story is about her finding Jesus with her dad's murders thrown in as asides. Also, the narrator sounds as if she is reading to children. I just couldn't finish it.

    131 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      4 out of 5 stars
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      4 out of 5 stars
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      4 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Jeff Scott
    • Jeff Scott
    • 01/02/2019

    Not For Everyone, But...

    I found this book fascinating, but it’s not for everyone. Listeners with a generalized interest in true crime will probably be disappointed. If you can’t at least tolerate the Christian worldview (regardless of your personal beliefs) you’ll find this to be unlistenable. However, for patient listeners, I assure you there could be no weirder listening experience than listening to this book and “Inside the Mind of BTK” by John Douglas back to back. I’ve listened to this book twice now, and all I can say at this point is that I’m seriously fearful the author of this book might one day read “Inside the Mind”. It’s clear she hasn’t, for understandable reasons, but I just....I don’t know. The two books together leave me with so many questions I would be afraid to ask this author (who is, no doubt, a remarkable and courageous woman). If you can read this with a compassionate heart this is well worth your time, but to “get it” you definitely need to know the details of the BTK case from another source/criminological perspective. I’ll be listening to both several more times trying to reconcile the elements of truth both contain.

    63 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      2 out of 5 stars
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      3 out of 5 stars
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    Image de profile pour JAD31
    • JAD31
    • 29/01/2019

    Extremely Boring!

    As much as I feel so bad for this woman and her family, her story is a big snooze-fest. The narrator puts no dynamic in her reading. Very, very boring. If you're looking for a story about Dennis Rader/BTK... this is not the book for you. I would not recommend this to anyone.

    83 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      3 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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      3 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Amazon Customer
    • Amazon Customer
    • 07/02/2019

    Rawson is strong, but guarded.

    I appreciate her journey. I'm happy she was able to put some of her memories about her dad down in writing.
    The content was interesting. Sort of. It wasn't real or raw or emotional in any way. It is very stiff and guarded. The opening, where she is informed by the FBI that her father had been arrested is the most "real" part of the book.
    She is able to express her fear very well. Her other emotions, not so much. But who can blame her?

    As a side note... I was perplexed when she complained about Stephen King's book and how it exploited the victims. King's novella was incredible. And Kerri's criticism was weird. The book in no way exploited anyone. At all. There are LOTS of books about her father that could be considered that way.
    So from that admittedly biased perspective, I thought it was odd that the victims played no part in her story. Other than names and the date her father murdered them.

    10 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
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    Image de profile pour cheryl.farren
    • cheryl.farren
    • 29/01/2019

    Can’t bring myself to finish this mess

    I was so excited about this book but after forcing myself to listen to a few hours I can’t go any further. There is very little talk about her father. If you want a book where she describes the color of everything she sees and uses this platform to tell her story of becoming a Christian then this is for you. The narration is awkward and reads more like a children’s book than a book about a serial killer.

    80 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    Image de profile pour Dawn's got to have it!
    • Dawn's got to have it!
    • 03/02/2019

    Great book

    I loved listening to this. I did it in 2 days. I always wondered how the serial killers family felt. This gave awesome insight. I'm a true crime junkie. I heard about the article done on his daughter on people. I just looked the book up knowing I was going to love it.

    8 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
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      1 out of 5 stars
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      1 out of 5 stars
    Image de profile pour Baytown Anita
    • Baytown Anita
    • 29/01/2019

    Children’s Book Narrator

    Unlistenable! what should have been a dramatically -interesting and hearty read was ruined by a narration, only suited for the children’s fairy tale genre. what a huge letdown and what a huge shame -
    Once upon a time....

    44 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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      5 out of 5 stars
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    Image de profile pour Rachel - Audible
    • Rachel - Audible
    • 29/01/2019

    Can you love a monster?

    I've grown to love what memoirs can reveal about our shared humanity when the author is willing to dig deep. True crime, on the other hand, has always given me nightmares. Enter the true crime memoir. It turns out I love true crime memoirs! When super creepy, criminal acts are filtered through the very personal, introspective lens of a memoir, I can handle it. I can stop covering my eyes. I can peer a little more closely into the depths of humanity.

    Kerri Rawson's astonishingly candid book about learning her beloved father had been leading a double life as a serial killer her entire life is the mother of all true crime memoirs. It touched me to my core. I'm all for the "complicated father-daughter-relationship" memoir, and it doesn't get any more complicated than "my dad is a serial killer." What I love about this book is how she fully explores the heart's confusion around knowing someone's a monster yet loving them anyway. She's so honest and pure in these moments, and her voice truly moved me.

    I also really appreciated the thread of dark humor that she weaves into her story. Being able to laugh at your pain is such a hallmark of surviving crime, trauma, and abuse, and Kerri Rawson has all that in spades. Even in the darkest moments of her story, she tosses out unexpected one liners that endeared her to me even more. She's funny, and it turns out she's also a very talented writer and storyteller.

    The first half of the book moves a bit slowly as she describes her family's life "pre-BTK," as in before anyone knew about her dad's double life. But this part of the story still has lots of payoff as it establishes the close relationship she had with her dad, as well as lays the foundations for her religious beliefs that would ultimately see her through her darkest hours. When she finally gets to "after-BTK" about halfway through the book, the story accelerates to lightning speeds, and I had to give myself a few little breaks only because it had gotten so intense.

    Even though the cover puts this story squarely in the "true crime" camp, I hope this memoir will find a wide audience as I truly loved it and found it to be a deft and moving account of a life that most of us can hardly even begin to imagine.

    31 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      1 out of 5 stars
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    Image de profile pour Julia
    • Julia
    • 04/07/2019

    This Book Should Never Have Been Published

    My daughter worked with Kerri Rawson's cousin in Arkansas so I believe that this is a true account of what happened to this family. However although Kerri Rawson has really suffered and been traumatised as a result of her Father's crime this book makes her sound like an accident prone, sickly drama queen who is so self centered that you want to shake her! Her constant reference to her religious beliefs were not only excessive but blown up beyond the belief. It felt as if she was inadvertantly trying to shout out loud "I BELIEVE IN GOD. I AM A GOOD PERSON". in order to block out the pain. Her constant 'tears floating down my face" became monotonous.

    My family too have been affected by horrendous crime that ended up on the front page of major international papers so I can empathize with her family's situation.

    Devon O'Day is a good narrator but a dreadful choice for this book. She really sounded as if she was reading a child's bedtime book and not the writings of a devastated, traumatised woman. It almost felt as if she was going to start it with "once apon a time". and ending with "....and they all lived happily ever after".

    This should have remained a personal journal as this woman is still far too traumatized to give a more readable account.

    4 personnes ont trouvé cela utile

    • Global
      5 out of 5 stars
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    Image de profile pour Kat - Audible
    • Kat - Audible
    • 09/01/2019

    Who do you turn to when the bogeyman is your own father?

    When Kerri Rawson moved into her first apartment, her dad, Dennis Rader, showed her how to keep its sliding-glass door secure at night. It wasn’t until years later that she learned her father—better known as the BTK Killer—once threw a brick through a neighbor’s sliding-glass door and killed the woman inside.

    Such devastating, irreconcilable memories haunt this extraordinary memoir—the most soul-searching, insightful, and compelling account by a serial killer’s loved one (and victim) I’ve ever come across. Rawson’s life was upended when Rader, a Boy Scout leader and church president, was exposed as the cruel predator who had tortured and murdered 10 people in Kansas over nearly two decades. What happened to her after that—the trauma and PTSD, the publicity, the fracturing of her family and entire world—can hardly be overstated. You’re unlikely to hear a memoir this jaw-dropping…ever. But Rawson’s nervy humor, her spiritual candor, and her capacity for compassion make her an endearing, even relatable, heroine—warmly voiced by narrator Devon O’Day.

    I congratulate Rawson on writing a terrific memoir that must have taken immeasurable courage. Forget the monster; I want to know where this remarkable survivor is going next.

    43 personnes ont trouvé cela utile