Votre titre Audible gratuit

How Music Works

Lu par : Andrew Garman
Durée : 13 h et 11 min
Prix : 30,20 €
9,95 € / mois après 30 jours. Résiliable à tout moment.

Description

Best known as a founding member and principal songwriter of the iconic band Talking Heads, David Byrne has received Grammy, Oscar, and Golden Globe awards and has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In the insightful How Music Works, Byrne offers his unique perspective on music - including how music is shaped by time, how recording technologies transform the listening experience, the evolution of the industry, and much more.

©2012 David Byrne (P)2012 Recorded Books

Critiques

"Anyone at all interested in music will learn a lot from this book." ( Kirkus Reviews)

Autres livres audio du même :

Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

Il n'y a pas encore de critique disponible pour ce titre.
Trier par :
  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Audio Gra Gra
  • 04/05/2016

Art Eats Itself

"How Music Works" is probably not quite the right title for this book. "How Music Happens" is a better suggestion as to the content of this fascinating and highly accessible book by David Byrne, best known as the lead singer from Talking Heads.
The book tries (and succeeds) in communicating how music throughout history has evolved according to both the context is it is written in and how technology advances. You don't have to be a musician or need to understand music theory to appreciate the book as it is written with the layman in mind and the many anecdotes included in the book are both fascinating and occasionally humorous.
The book explores classical music, world music, jazz, rock and electronic music and how all forms of music absorb influences from other genres, how they are composed according to the uses of available recording and musical instrument technology, and how the anticipated audience also influences the final product.
It also explains how various instruments were either used or adapted to suit the venues they were being played in and to rise in volume above the music they were playing alongside.
Learn why the first rock and roll singles were almost exclusively three minutes long, why Louis Armstrong had to be placed at the back of the room when recording or how tape may never have come to the forefront as a recording technology had Bing Crosby not wanted to play more golf!
For the David Byrne fans out there, there are also some brief insights into his evolving songwriting process, from young teenager, through his Talking Heads Years and on to his solo work, although these are certainly only a minor focus of the book. The book is also written in Byrne's sometimes cute / earnest , matter of fact style and I found his writing to be witty and entertaining.
Highly recommended to all music lovers.
Narration is reserved but good.

55 sur 57 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Daniel
  • 16/12/2012

"David Byrne is a Human" by a Talking Heads fan

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Byrne writes like a Malcom Gladwell in the music world. To me, that was interesting enough to keep me hooked because I didn't realize David Byrne was so smart and normal. I would recommend this book if you are trying to "figure out" music. Not that he claims to understand music completely. He tries to keep a balanced view and show the realm of possibilities of "how music works." Sometimes he goes on long tangents, talking about his projects after Talking Heads (which was sometimes interesting).

It was a great book to have in the car on the way to and from work.

What was one of the most memorable moments of How Music Works?

His section on music writing collaboration. For me, as someone in a band, I really took away some great communication techniques.

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

The narrator was OK. I felt he seemed to miss Byrne's connotation sometimes. He also doesn't know how to pronounce "timbre." I feel like Byrne definitely didn't listen to this audiobook and OK everything.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Nothing too extreme. There were parts that were very exciting, like when he related to exactly what my band is going through right now.

Any additional comments?

I would say that if you are still enchanted with The Talking Heads sound, don't read this book. I haven't listened to them since reading it, but I suspect some of the magic may be gone when I do. This is ok for me, because one day I hope to reach levels that David Byrne reached. Or if you are a music fan, and want to see behind the scenes, it will be a fun read. You may want to skip through some parts, but overall it's worth it.

It's very unfortunate that the only other review on here was from some conservative person. Yes, Byrne goes on a few little rants in favor of liberalism, but i wouldn't say that's his main objective.

58 sur 62 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • thomas
  • 30/07/2013

Very Good

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes. I am a music fan first and although I really enjoy Talking Heads and David Byrne I would not consider myself a huge fan. With that said this is a very good book for anyone who likes music and want to understand it more. It comes off as thoughtful and well researched, with a point of view. I recommend it highly with those caveats and parameters.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Well David Byrne is essentially the character here ....his viewpoint is fascinating. I like the fact that he is explaining why his artistic taste and choices are what they are. Whether you agree or not, it's interesting.

Have you listened to any of Andrew Garman’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No but I thought he did a good job, well done Andrew.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Having been to CBGB's I thought it was funny how he clinically described that down trodden club. His focus on acoustics and performance context was something I never thought of when in that space.

Any additional comments?

There have been a few other good music books I have read recently "The Life and Times of Brian Eno" and "Love Goes to Building on Fire"; both were very good. I would put this book on that par. If you are fan of musicology, the process of how art is made, anecdotes about a localized music scene and insight into how music gets made this is a great book. This is not a revealing, personality driven book about the rock n roll lifestyle. It descries music as art. I really enjoyed it, and I am glad I read/listened to it.

33 sur 35 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Elwood J. Bergman
  • 02/04/2016

Insights from a Master

Mr. Byrne has spent a lifetime living and breathing music, so it's not surprising that he had some ways of looking at it which hadn't occurred to me. An encouraging, thorough book which will give you a different perspective on music even if you already know a lot about it. I'd recommend it for every performer especially as it can inspire you to improve the show you put on.

7 sur 7 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Derek A. Neff
  • 29/12/2015

Great even if you're not a Talking Heads fan

What made the experience of listening to How Music Works the most enjoyable?

I most enjoyed Byrne's insights into the craft of songwriting and recording. I also found his theory on how music is created to best suit the venue or medium at hand fascinating.

What was one of the most memorable moments of How Music Works?

His chapter on "How to create/start a scene" chapter is lots of fun, as it simultaneously discusses the specific history of the 1970s CBGB "scene" and also describes the different factors that went into making that whole chapter the seminal part of music history it (retrospectively) became.

Which character – as performed by Andrew Garman – was your favorite?

David Byrne, of course! Listening to Garman narrate, I eventually forgot that I wasn't listening to Byrne. (No mean feat, given that Byrne's voice is of course quite famous, and is nothing like Garman's.)

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

The book is written as a series of discrete, essay-like chapters. I enjoyed listening to it in bits and pieces over a week or two.

Any additional comments?

Although there are sections here and there about Byrne's years working with the Talking Heads (and with Brian Eno), there's so much more to the book than this. You don't need to know his specific body of work at all in order to enjoy this... although it definitely makes the book more enjoyable if you do.

6 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Darwin8u
  • 28/05/2015

Audiobook is Better

I enjoyed this exploration of music with David Byrne as the talking head, gently guiding the listener through how music (and the music business) work(s).

Like several nonfiction books I've read/listened to lately, my big complaint is I wish he just gave us more, dug a bit deeper, and perhaps hired a better editor. I like that the book was infused with Byrnes' own populist, funky, musical biases. It seemed autistically casual. Like talking to a really open person who isn't trying to hide or pull the shades on his own past. He didn't shy away from his own mistakes and his own life. He used Talking Heads and his own albums as examples of the different ways music can be done and sold. His interests allow this book to move from punk to African music to soundtracks, etc.

One of my favorite themes of Byrne's reminded me of the last book I read (The World Beyond Your Head: On Becoming an Individual in an Age of Distraction). David Byrne seemed passionate about not just music alone, but music's place in our social networks. How music is both a communication with others and reflective of our community. In his more zen moments he even rambles on about the music of the Universe, etc. Byrne's biases were occasionally annoying. He did seem to carry a pretty large dark spot right on-top of classic music's basic repertoire. His politics, or musical reactions to politics, also seems a bit naïve. But all is forgiven, in the end. This is a guy who is not afraid to put himself WAY out there, describe the scene as he sees it, and figure out a way to make the people around him want to dance. And THAT I guess says a lot and hides a multitude of minor sins as we dance into the darkness.

24 sur 28 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Kazuhiko
  • 16/06/2013

This ain't no disco!

Before listening to "How Music Works", based on what I knew about his music (his Talking Heads days anyway; my favorite album was "Remain in Light"), I thought to myself: does he mean "How Modern Pop Music Works"? But after listening to it, I now think that the title is appropriate, at least up to the current period.

This book covers a wide range of topics, including: how the historical, social, and technological environment shaped the type of music; what he was feeling/thinking while going through the experience of making music with Talking Heads in the lower east side of New York City in the 70s and 80s; how different cultures and people influenced his music; the financial aspect of making music in the current music production environment, and more. I can tell that he is extremely well read, but his interpretation of cultural/social aspects of music is unique, I think. He is also a very good writer. I really enjoyed this book.

9 sur 10 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • brian
  • 02/01/2015

Good but slow

This was a good book but moved kinda slow and jumped around a lot and did get boring at times but overall good has a lot of good information on music

3 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Carter C Addy
  • 19/05/2017

Excellent work! Vast and important.

Brilliant coverage of all things music from the mind of a relative artist. Very Impressive!

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • beth and chris
  • 15/10/2013

Everything I wanted to know

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I've recommended this audiobook to friends who play music. Some of them would be more likely to read it themselves and that is cool too. As long as the ideas are passed on. The wisdom in this book is overflowing.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

music makes cents

Any additional comments?

I was disappointed that David Byrne didn't do the reading for this recording. but after a chapter or two I forgot that I cared who was reading it. Honestly the words are so Byrne that by the end of the book I thought Garman was Byrne.

2 sur 2 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.