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Haruki Murakami is the David Lynch of literature; everything doesn’t always make sense, but it's so compelling you can't stop listening or trying to fit the pieces of the puzzle together. Such is the case with Murakami's mind-bending Kafka on the Shore, which follows the lives of 15-year-old Kafka and an old man named Nakata, who might be aspects of the same person...or maybe not. What we do know is that Kafka runs away from home to find his lost mother and sister and winds up living in a library in the seaside town of Takamatsu, where he spends his days reading literature. Then he's suspected of being involved in a murder. In alternating chapters, we also hear the story of Nakata, who makes a living as a "cat whisperer," searching for lost pets. He embarks on a road trip searching for a particularly hard to find cat, traveling far away from his home for the first time, and the narrative suggests he's fated to meet Kafka. But does he? Oh, and there's also truly bizarre appearances by Johnnie Walker and Colonel Sanders.

Oliver Le Sueur as Kafka and Sean Barrett as Nakata both give hypnotic readings of the main and supporting characters. Le Sueur performs double duty for Kafka and the teen's inner voice, Crow, reading with such gravitas that you might find yourself leaning forward a bit with expectancy for the next line of dialogue or intricate detail. Barrett's deep, warm voice is perfectly grandfatherly as Nakata, whose uncertain destination and deep wonder at the world he has never seen is the lynchpin of the novel. Barrett's voice is a national treasure in Britain – having voiced Shakespeare, Dickens, and Beckett – and you'll wish he narrated just about every book once you hear how he commits to Nakata.

As Kafka prepares to leave home, his alter ego tells the boy that he's about to enter a metaphysical and symbolic storm. "Once the storm is over you won't remember how you made it through – how you managed to survive. You won't even be sure if the storm is over, but one thing is certain – when you come out of the storm you won't be the same person who walked in." That can also be said of any listener who chooses to explore Murakami's beautiful, enigmatic world. —Collin Kelley

Description

Kafka on the Shore follows the fortunes of two remarkable characters. Kafka Tamura runs away from home at 15, under the shadow of his father's dark prophesy. The aging Nakata, tracker of lost cats, who never recovered from a bizarre childhood affliction, finds his pleasantly simplified life suddenly turned upside down. Their parallel odysseys are enriched throughout by vivid accomplices and mesmerising dramas. Cats converse with people; fish tumble from the sky; a ghostlike pimp deploys a Hegel-spouting girl of the night; a forest harbours soldiers apparently un-aged since WWII. There is a savage killing, but the identity of both victim and killer is a riddle.

Murakami's new novel is at once a classic tale of quest, but it is also a bold exploration of mythic and contemporary taboos, of patricide, of mother-love, of sister-love. Above all it is an entertainment of a very high order.

©2005 Haruki Murakami (P)2005 Naxos Audiobooks

Critiques

"I've never read a novel that I found so compelling because of its narrative inventiveness and love of storytelling....Great entertainment." ( Guardian)
"An insistently metaphysical mind-bender." ( The New Yorker)
"Daringly original and compulsively readable." ( The Washington Post's Book World)

Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

Notations

Global

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Performance

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Histoire

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
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  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Un de mes livres préferé, très bien lu.

Considérez-vous la version audio meilleure que la version papier ?

J'ai lu le livre en francais, je l'ai écoué en anglais. Il était très bien lu.

Avec quel autre livre pouvez-vous comparer Kafka on the Shore ? Expliquez pourquoi.

Kafka est sans conteste un de mes livres préféré de Murukami, entre réalité folle, imagination débordante et fantastique.

Avez-vous d'autres commentaires ?

Great book, a must read!

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Le meilleur Murakami

Considérez-vous la version audio meilleure que la version papier ?

Non, c'est différent mais tout aussi agréable.

Auriez-vous pu écouter ce livre audio en une seule fois ?

Non, pas plus que je n'ai lu le livre d'une seule traite mais il est vrai qu'on a du mal à le lâcher.

Avez-vous d'autres commentaires ?

Les autres livres de Murakami sont trop long, j'ai l'impression qu'il est payé à la page. Les histoires sont toujours intéressantes mais il pourrait vraiment supprimer des passages inutiles, condenser plus. Ce n'est pas le cas dans "Kafka sur le rivage", en dehors du passage sur ce monde des morts que je ne trouve pas terrible, c'est un très bon livre. Murakami sait très bien jongler avec le merveilleux et le voyage initiatique.

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  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Mel
  • 09/05/2012

Brilliant Meandering--what was in those brownies..

In Haruki Murakami's own words:
"It's all pointless--assuming you try to find a point to it." Kafka on the Shore
"It's not that meaning cannot be explained. But there are certain meanings that are lost forever the moment they are explained in words." 1Q84

I read this book last year, my first HM read, which I jumped into with no knowledge of the author, and having read no reviews of the book at all. Since then I have read several of Murakami books, and not because I am an enthusiastic fan at all--I actually found myself a little disturbed by Kafka on the Shore. I was bothered by the wierd sexuality, the blurry boundaries and constructs, the pointless ramblings, the silliness I thought bordered on insult to the reader. I read interviews Murakami had done, I read about his background, I read very dissected critiques by scholars of Murakami books, and still held on to a bit of repulsion towards Murakami's books. But...I kept reading his books! I was drawn to them; they haunted me, they stayed with me, persistently colored my mind.

When 1Q84 was released, I bought it impulsively,then wondered why. I realized that Murakami writes for the reader; I understood that what brought me back time and time again to HM was the fact that somewhere in me, I knew that in HM's books I was in the presence of genius. I could read/listen to HM and drift through a dream, like closing my eyes and floating on a raft in the pool, I didn't need to make sense of the journey--I just enjoyed it.

I relate this only to try to explain the experience I had with Kafka on the Shore, It was in many ways magical and lasting. I'm not sure I loved it, but it captured me. I could compare it to the other books of his but I will not because it has been done--I will leave you with my experience and say that Murakami, like any author, is not for everyone--just like Beethoven or Mozart are not for everyone--but their genius cannot be argued. I am looking forward to listening to 1Q84--just picking the right time to be consummed. If you are compelled to find meaning in every event, to right each word with your own understanding, read again the top 2 quotes by Murakami...you may "find" something that isn't even really there at all.

37 sur 37 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Steve
  • 20/08/2007

Passionate!

This story is wonderfully hypnotic and romantic and beautiful.
I was hesitant to download it at first, as I knew nothing of Murakami and modern Japanese fiction, but it surpassed all of my expectations and I was pleased to find that it transcended all political and cultural boundaries.
The narration is exceptional - esp. Oliver Le Sueur's Kafka - and the story was surprisingly Western in feel, and universal in its themes.

This story may not be for everyone, but for those who wish to venture outside the norm - and into a world of timeless love and gothic, romantic, tragedy - you could not do much better than this.

26 sur 26 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • H. Ishrak
  • 18/05/2006

fantastic narration

I have read some other books by this author and have enjoyed them immensely. This book is up to his usual standard. I thought the narration in this audio book was exceptional - better than any other book I have had from Audible (except His Dark Materials). I would highly recommend this book to Haruki Murakami fans. I hope they will publish more of his books in audio form. He is such an interesting author.

13 sur 13 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Victor
  • 20/04/2009

The boy named Crow

Excellent story. Why? Because it reaches into a place inside, not in all of us, but in some who see and hear the world in a shadow not as bright, not quite full. Those who peer into everyday life and feel the past, present and future collide into Kafka's character along with their own touch of ghostly sense will relate with this story of heartbreak and misty creatures lurking just beneath the surface.

9 sur 9 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Michael Gates
  • 02/12/2008

Dream Convergence

This is a beautiful rendering of two dream-like stories (which are nevertheless full of realistic details) that converge in the end, though not in the way you may suspect. You never know what is going to happen next with Murakami, and this novel, long as it is, kept me captivated to the end. There are many astonishing scenes here, some quite funny (especially those involving one Colonel Sanders), and elements of murder mystery, science fiction, and fantasy. The narrators handle the multiple characters with skill, and manage to keep the surreal plot grounded.

8 sur 8 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Jefferson
  • 25/04/2013

A Sensual, Metaphysical, and Entertaining Fantasy

When fifteen-year-old Kafka Tamura runs away from his Tokyo home, he brings with him a supply-filled backpack, a boy called Crow (his "imaginary" friend or "real" alter-ego), and a heavy load of Oedipal baggage. In Takamatsu on the island of Shikoku, he begins frequenting a private library staffed by Oshima, the beautiful, well-read, and understanding young man behind the front desk, and Miss Saeki, the middle-aged woman in charge who could be Kafka's mother, who abandoned him when he was a little boy. Meanwhile, back in Tokyo an old man called Nakata tries to find a missing calico cat called Goma. When he was an elementary school student during WWII, Nakata fell into a mysterious coma and woke up from it empty of memory, including the ability to read and write. He therefore receives a government subsidy for the mentally impaired, supplementing that income by finding lost cats, which is facilitated by his coma-granted ability to speak with felines.

In Kafka on the Shore (2002) Haruki Murakami suspensefully and entertainingly merges those two plot strands in chapters that alternate between the protagonists' points of view. And the novel, which begins mysteriously (Why is Kafka running away? Why is Kafka his alias? Why does he hate his father? Why did his mother run off with his sister and leave him behind? Who exactly is the boy called Crow? Is the young woman he meets on the bus his sister? What is Oshima's story? What happened to Nakata when he was a boy? Can he really speak with cats? What is his connection to Kafka? Etc.), is also at first quirkily charming. But it darkens, like a bright dream of flight morphing into a nightmare in which you commit terrible acts and are pursued and prodded by strange forces and fates beyond your will. The novel remains funny throughout, but becomes ever-more thought-provoking, frightening, and moving.

Murakami relishes dismantling the boundary between reality and fantasy, waking and dreaming, the flesh and the spirit, which makes reading his books--like this one--a disorienting experience. On the one hand, his characters navigate a sea of cultural artifacts and signs that would seem to fix them (and us) in the real world, like Radiohead and Prince, Chunichi Dragons baseball caps and Nike tennis shoes, weight-lifting machines and routines, and Japanese noodles and omelets, and his characters perform everyday physical actions like eating, eliminating, washing, and sleeping. On the other hand, they may be led by a talking dog to a fancy house where a madman who is making a flute from the souls of cats asks them to do something awful, meet "concepts" who take the form of cultural icons like Colonel Sanders, wake up in strange places splattered with blood without having any idea of what happened, have sex with ghosts, dreamers, or spirits, or enter hermetic worlds outside time. That juxtaposition between the cultural and sensual and the fantastic and spiritual is one of the appeals of Murakami's fiction.

Finally, though, when Kafka on the Shore ended, I felt somehow disappointed. I felt partly that either I'm not smart enough or careful enough a reader to see all the loose ends tied up or that Murakami left some things a bit too vague. And I felt partly that Kafka is too precocious for 15, knows too much, is too capable, and that Murakami's device of demonstrating his youth by making him easily blush is too pat. When Kafka guesses that a piano sonata is by Schubert because it doesn't sound like one by Beethoven or Schumann, or sees that a man "has three days' worth of stubble on his face," or knows that a pair of soldiers from over 60 years ago are carrying Arisaka rifles, I am jarred from suspension of disbelief. As a result, when Kafka is plunging into a dense forest as he tries to whistle the complex tune of John Coltrane's "My Favorite Things" until he reaches the piano solo by McCoy Tyner, I understand that Murakami is amplifying the labyrinth effect, but it strikes me that he's also showing off his cultural knowledge through an unconvincing vehicle.

And that made me think that, although most of the sex scenes in the novel are necessary for the story, for at least one Murakami seems to be indulging a desire to titillate, as when he has a university philosophy student "sex machine" girl perform oral sex on a truck driver while quoting and explaining concepts from Bergson and Hegel. The philosophical ideas tie in with things going on in the novel, but perhaps could have been communicated less raunchily.

All that said, I loved Nakata and was moved by his past and present, and enjoyed his relationship with the ignorant and feckless young truck driver Hoshino, whom I also came to like a lot. And I was intrigued and moved by Kafka's relationship with Oshima. And I am glad to have read Kafka on the Shore. It made me think about things like the ever-decreasing darkness in our modern city nights and the ever-present darkness in the human heart, the relationships between metaphors and the world, and the rooms of memory that we maintain because life consists of losing precious things. It also made me want to read "In the Penal Colony," The Tale of Genji, and The 1001 Nights and to listen to Beethoven's Archduke Trio, to eat broiled fish, and to try again to talk with a cat.

The readers are superb, especially Sean Barrett as Nakata and Hoshino. Listening to Barrett narrate Nakata's strange and sad childhood and life and then deliver Nakata's lines in his aged, diffident, and beautiful voice (as when he says, "Nakata is not very bright," or "Grilled eggplants and vinegared cucumbers are some of Nakata's favorites," or especially "I felt them, through your hands") was very moving. And Oliver Le Sueur is a convincing Kafka, ultra bright, sincere, and thoughtful.

6 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amanda
  • 21/04/2012

A Hypnotic and Compelling Dream-Like Journey

Kafka on the Shore was my second Haruki Murakami novel, which I sought out after 1Q84. These two stories are extremely different, but many of the undercurrents are the same.

The story alternates between two voices; that of Kafka, the young boy with no family ties he feels he can call his own - and Nakata, the older, simple man who is the "Finder of Lost Cats". We track the slow progress of both of these characters through their individual journeys and challenges, and patiently wait with faith for the time when their paths will converge.

This book is not for all people. It's nonsensical, surreal, and sometimes patently bizarre. There will be many events left completely unexplained, and story lines left uncompleted. The novel requires a relinquishing of control, and an acceptance that in the end, some of the story will make sense, and some of it will not.

For those people who are willing and able to enjoy the journey - and let go of the destination - this book may end up being something that takes a hold of you, and and touches you with it's moments of kindness, vulnerability, and beauty.

18 sur 20 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Ikue
  • 30/11/2006

very interesting!

I listened to this story more attentively than any other audible books I bought. It was so interesting that I just couldn't stop listening.

9 sur 10 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Chelsea Garrison
  • 18/05/2006

Philisophical - I think?

The narration was very good and after I got passed the first bit I have to admit I was engrossed. However one of the main reasons it kept me interested was I was waiting for everything to be explained. As far as I could tell that did not happen.
If you are used to reading books that are a little deep then I would recommend it. If you are like myself and like most questions answered clearly by the end of a book then it's probably not for you.

11 sur 13 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Volodymyr
  • 02/05/2006

Very wonderful book!

Very wonderful book! Mystic + Philosophy + unique talent of Haruki Murakami
I’ve read this book recently and now listen audio with great pleasure.
Note: it is not for easy listening (such while you driving or eating..) but I still recommend it for people who like very high quality literature .

14 sur 17 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

Trier par :
  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Martina
  • Oberpframmern, Deutschland
  • 05/01/2007

Ein Genuss

Die Buecher von H.M. sind von der Handlung her meistens etwas 'Schraeg', also nicht 100% realistisch - man muss sich darauf einlassen. Dieses Buch ist wunderbar erzaehlt und spannend. Das Englisch war fuer mich gut versteandlich.
Wer Murakami mag, wird dieses Buch lieben.

8 sur 8 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • folgren
  • Aachen, Deutschland
  • 30/10/2007

Sieben Leben

Etwas Seltsames geschieht, wenn man dieses Buch hört. Mitten drin fällt einem auf, wie dick es doch zu sein scheint, aber man legt es nicht aus der Hand. Nicht weil es plötzlich Blutegel regnet, die unbeantworte Frage, was real ist und was nicht, wieder einmal gestellt wird. Man möchte unbedingt wissen, wie dieser Roman ausgeht. Wenn ein Autor das schafft, muß er sein Handwerk verstehen. Natürlich kann er nicht bei jedem die hochgesteckten Erwartungen erfüllen und der ein oder andere mag auf Grund des unspektakulären Endes ein wenig enttäuscht sein, trotzdem verwandelt Murakami diesen eigenartigen Stoff mittels Anleihen bei Kriminalhandlung, bekettscher Endzeitstimmung und wie er es selber nennt: eines Road-Movies mit wechselnden Schauplätzen und wechselnden Akteuren in einen Roman, bei dem man sich nicht langweilt, sich höchstens dabei erwischt, wie man den Kopf über das absurde Labyrinth schüttelt und schmunzelt.

5 sur 5 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • BikerJoe
  • 06/12/2016

Oedipus on an Odyssey in modern Japan

No surprise, this is a great book and you would not expect anything else from Murakami. As far as I am concerned, it is the best book, I listened to this year and this also partly due to the fantastic reading job, Sean Barrett and Oliver Le Sueur did.

Murakami’s story reminded me to a certain extend of Sophocles' tragedy of Oedipus. In both cases there is an identical gruesome prophecy, but whereas it ends in disaster in the old Greek play, it leads to deliverance and liberation in Murakami’s narrative.

It is a fantastic story with strong, archetypal pictures and scenes, but far from your typical fantasy novel. The ingredients for that are there, talking cats, fish and leeches falling from the sky and a mysterious entrance stone to another world, but regardless of all the metaphysical attire, it is a story about love, loss and the search for a meaningful life.

The protagonists of the story are the 15 year old teenage boy, Kafka Tamura, who ran away from home to escape from his heartless father and Nakata, an innocent, endearing old man, who suffers from a wartime affliction. They never meet in person, but they are closely linked by fate. Both of them set out on an odyssey, Kafka to find his long-lost mother and sister and Nakata to find the mysterious entrance stone.

Of course Murakami knows, how to tell a story. The prose is colorful - an excellent translation obviously - and there is more than a pinch of humor now and then, e.g. when we meet Johnny Walker from the whisky label and Colonel Sanders from KFC in person.

This book is more than just entertainment. It resonated very strongly with me and long after I listened to it, it stayed on my mind and I could not help, but think about Kafka, Nakata and their friends.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Brigitte Bremser
  • 25/05/2018

weerd at first glance

Murakami's style. I was about to put the book dow. but than something changed and the story got another twist.
The story tellers are in a class of there own.
all in all a book worth reading

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Negar
  • 31/01/2018

Magnificent.

My first Murakami. A complex erratic story full of twists and tangles.it takes you beyond boundaries of normal real life with all those wonderful magical moments. Full of unique characters. Even the ones who didn’t seem to play a major role where charismatic( mr. Nakata was my favourite of all). It builds up beautiful, mundane as well as brutal,bizarre and achingly lovely scenes in your mind.
A mixture of fantasy, magic realism, repetition, symbols and metaphors ties together in a genius way. I just can’t describe how much I enjoyed every moment of it.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • El Mago
  • hamburg
  • 26/02/2017

Beauty

The book starts of almost depressing but then sucks you in and won't let you go. The two main characters are deep but very lovable. I read the book twice back to back because I felt that missed some of Haruki's message and even in the second go I couldn't let go....love it

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • anna
  • 09/10/2016

great read and performance

this was the best book I ever read/heard and the narrators were excellent as well

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • j E N S
  • 28/07/2016

mixed opinion

1st half: good, mysterious, engaging, diverse, rich, colorful...
2nd half: pretentious, repetitive, drivel, pseudointellectual, aimless, boring...

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Wolfgang
  • 14/05/2015

Wonderful literature

A world of its own. Beautifully narrated.Interesting characters.
Don't understand though how the old man's story and the librarians relate.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • vms1160
  • Wien, Oesterreich
  • 02/04/2011

Großartige Geschichte, grandios gelesen, enttäuschendes Ende

Murakamis Geschichten sind nie "ganz normal", diese ist fesselnd und außerdem genial erzählt und gesprochen. Die ca. 20 Stunden sind schnell vorbei - leider auch das Ende, hier hätte ich mir mehr erwartet. Auch wenn ich hier etwas enttäuscht war, bleibt dennoch der Genuss der vielen Stunden vorher im Vordergrund. Jedenfalls hörenswert!

0 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.