Prix : 15,43 €

Détails de l'abonnement : Détails de l'abonnement :
  • Gratuit pendant 30 jours, avec un titre au choix offert.
  • 9,95 € par mois pour le livre audio de votre choix, quel que soit le prix.
  • Vous n'aimez pas un titre ? Échangez-le.
  • Résiliez à tout moment, vos livres audio vous appartiennent.
ou
Dans le panier

Avis de l'équipe

Why we think it's Essential: In considering which Shakespeare recording was most essential, we found ourselves caught between Gielgud's Hamlet and Richard Burton's MacBeth (which, ironically, was directed by Gielgud). In the end, we chose Gielgud because, as a radio production (unlike Burton's stage performance) it was meant for the ear, not the eye. As a result, Gielgud delivers what may be the best Hamlet we've ever heard. — Steve Feldberg

Description

This outstanding historical recording made in 1941 for radio is widely regarded as one of the finest Hamlet performances ever, and one of John Gielgud's greatest moments. Though he went on to record it for commercial release, nothing matched this recording in the BBC studios, made before the days of editing.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

Public Domain (P)2006 Naxos AudioBooks

Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

Notations

Global

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    1
  • 4 étoiles
    0
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    1
  • 4 étoiles
    0
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Histoire

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    1
  • 4 étoiles
    0
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0
Il n'y a pas encore de critique disponible pour ce titre.
Trier par :
  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Michel
  • 15/07/2007

Wonderful!!!

Even though an old recording, the vocals are clear and understandable. I have listened to it at least 20 times over.

17 sur 17 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Chris
  • 13/01/2009

Gielgud's Hamlet - A Study in Perfection

I am loth to lament the passing of anything to do with Shakespeare as we have seen the astonishing durability of his work over the centuries. But I do have to wonder whether we will ever hear work of this quality again.
At least five years to grow the voice. A similar time spent on the texts, against a background where the study of grammar and the philology of English was a given in any high school. This was the expected investment of any actor playing Shakespeare on the English professional stage at the time this recording was made.
I'm not talking about the requirements to play Hamlet, or Claudius. I refer to those who play Horatio, or the grave-digger, or the 'boy' in the players.
The result was a radiant and transparent reading of the text, fully understood - line, word and pause - by every player.
And of course, their understanding of and absorption in the text means we are hearing people who appear to be simply voicing their own thoughts, their own feelings.
The result is that all obscurity is dispelled. The way the human brain works, we now know, is by a kind of paint-by-dots. You don't have to see every detail to see the whole picture, nor do you have to hear and understand every word to understand what is being said.
It adds up to an almost magic accessibility of language which, when we read it on the page, seems difficult, odd, at times meaningless in the 21st Century.
Don't care much for Shakespeare? Too much like hard work?
Don't say that until you have heard this glorious performance. If you don't 'get' this, then you really don't get it and might as well give the Bard a miss.
Poor you.
I am sure you are very much fewer than is commonly believed. I am sure that for most people their difficulty with the plays of Shakespeare is that they have seen it acted by players who were clutching at the meaning with tips of their fingers, instead of breathing it in and out as their native air itself.
The best!

16 sur 16 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Donald
  • 28/10/2010

AWESOME!

I must've listened to this a hundred times and never tire of it. Gielgud's performance is phenomenal. Surely the best Shakespeare recording available on audible.

3 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Jefferson
  • 01/02/2011

Funny, Awful, Moving, Lovely, Amazing!

I agree 100% with the other reviewers--even though it is an old recording and you can kind of hear a little static type noise in the background sometimes, the voices come through clear and loud and the occasional sound effects (martial drumming, ghostly wind blowing, fanfare trumpeting, grave digging, etc.) sound just right.

The cast is exceptional, everyone perfect for his/her role with, perhaps, two exceptions. I don't care for Ophelia's voice or manner somehow, for she sounds a bit too old and nasal, though when she sings her sad, mad songs, she's great. And Laertes is a little too nasal for my likings, too, though when he becomes enraged at Hamlet and out for his blood, he's great, too.

And John Gielgud! What a beautiful, liquid, bell-like, refined, flexible, measured, emotional, intelligent voice! Every word he says is honed perfection that at the same time feels like impromptu passion, as if he is saying the lines for the first tine instead of for the thousandth (as he must have done over the course of his many rehearsal performances of Hamlet). And the other actors are superb, Claudius, Gertrude, Horatio, King Hamlet, the grave diggers, R & G, the players, all perfect.

And of course the play itself is magnificent in its oddity and power and philosophy and raw emotion and spying and sneaking and acting and all...

Yes, it is a powerful pleasure listening to this audiobook, and I'm sure I'll come back to it repeatedly over the years

3 sur 4 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Martin A. Nicholas
  • 22/01/2018

Well worth it

A 3-hour 25-minute BBC radio production from the 1940s. It’s an old-fashioned production—-there have been improvements in Shakespearean acting since the 1940s—-but quite listenable. That language! And that voice!

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • SMB
  • 04/04/2017

Powerful, Wonderful Production

I had been looking for the Gielgud version of Hamlet for years. I am so happy to have been able to find it through Audible. This has to rank up there as one of the best of all time. It takes some concentration as a few of the voices are similar sounding. However, the script is completely intact (not abridged), and the performances are outstanding. Gielgud plays a sympathetic Hamlet and brings some unexpected nuances to his performance. Arguably, I prefer this version to the Olivier and Michael Redgrave performances, which were made within the same time period.

Trier par :
  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • folgren
  • 04/11/2007

Mutter

Gibt es ein Stück, aus dem mehr Zitate zum Allgemeingut geworden sind? Die selbst in abgewandelter Form, auf ihr Original hinweisen? Neben Romeo und Julia dürfte das Drama um den dänischen Kronprinzen wohl zu den meistbekannten Stücken bei Nichttheatergängern zählen. Der Vater ermordet, selbst tief in der Sinnkrise steckend wütet Hamlet im Verlauf der Handlung durch den Hof für die scheinbar gerechte Sache. Er zieht eine Blutspur hinter sich her, treibt die unglücklich verliebte Ophelia in den Selbstmord und wird am Ende selbst gerichtet. Ein düsteres Werk, daß sein Überleben vor allem dem Umstand zu verdanken hat, daß es auf jede Zeit paßt, nicht zuletzt immer wieder im Film aktualisiert wird, sich Regisseure auf der Bühne dazu berufen fühlen, sich die Frage zu beantworten, was hat Hamlet mit uns zu tun? Alles. Shakespeare hat eine Fabel auf die Menschheit geschrieben. Wir nehmen uns, was wir zu unserem Glück glauben, unbedingt besitzen zu müssen. Selbst Hamlet dient der Gerechtigkeit nicht allein, nachdem die Mutter sich mit dem Mörder des Vaters vermählt hat. Er ist so in sich versponnen, daß man ihn sich schlecht als weisen König vorstellen könnte. Shakespeares Stärke beruht auch hier wieder in den zahlreichen Nebenfiguren. In Horatio, Polonius, Güldenstern und Rosenkranz, in denen er weitere Varianten menschlichen Strebens vorführt. Ein Stück, das immer neue Deutungen provoziert, obwohl alle glauben alles bereits darüber gesagt zu haben. So lebendig, so unsterblich. John Gielguds Hamlet sucht seines gleichen