Prix : 19,46 €

Détails de l'abonnement : Détails de l'abonnement :
  • Gratuit pendant 30 jours, avec un titre au choix offert.
  • 9,95 € par mois pour le livre audio de votre choix, quel que soit le prix.
  • Vous n'aimez pas un titre ? Échangez-le.
  • Résiliez à tout moment, vos livres audio vous appartiennent.
ou
Dans le panier

Description

At the heart of these stories, as with all the best of Lovecraft’s work, is the belief that the Earth was once inhabited by powerful and evil gods, just waiting for the chance to recolonise their planet. Cthulhu is one such god, lurking deep beneath the sea until called into being by cult followers who – like all humans – know not what they do. It is because of these dark, mythic tales with their terrified awareness of the limits of Man’s knowledge, that H.P. Lovecraft is one of the most influential American writers.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©2010 Naxos AudioBooks (P)2010 Naxos AudioBooks

Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

Notations

Global

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    1
  • 4 étoiles
    0
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    1
  • 4 étoiles
    0
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Histoire

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    1
  • 4 étoiles
    0
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0
Il n'y a pas encore de critique disponible pour ce titre.
Trier par :
  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Kirsten M. Crippen
  • 30/10/2011

Very atmospheric and creepy

For some reason, I had never read Lovecraft before - even though my mother had read all of his stories. This collection is incredible. The stories are creepy. But even so the performance really makes the stories. The music and the dramatic reading by Mr Roberts makes this a keeper. Something I will make a point of listening to again and again - especially for Halloween!

35 sur 37 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Katherine
  • 19/09/2012

Required reading

"In his house at R’lyeh, dead Cthulhu waits dreaming.”

Ask any writer of horror, fantasy, or weird fiction who their influences were and H.P. Lovecraft’s name is almost sure to come up, especially if they’re over the age of 50. For this reason alone, all true fans of these genres must experience H.P. Lovecraft’s work for themselves. Think of it as “required reading.” Even if you don’t read horror or weird tales, Lovecraft’s Cthulhu mythos pops up regularly in fantasy literature, games, television, music, and art, so it’s a good idea to get a little of it under your belt.

If you want to get a good quick culturally-relevant dose of Lovecraft, I recommend The Call of Cthulhu and Other Stories which is available in several editions. I listened to Naxos AudioBooks’ version read by William Roberts, which I downloaded at Audible.com for $4.95. This version (there are others) is 4½ hours long and contains four important Lovecraftian stories: “The Call of Cthulhu,” “The Hound,” “The Dunwich Horror,” and “Dagon.” The narration is excellent; Mr. Roberts’s voice and cadence helped evoke a suitably sinister ambiance.

In “The Call of Cthulhu,” the first story in Lovecraft’s Cthulhu mythos which was published in Weird Tales in 1928, we learn from our narrator that Cthulhu is a monster who lives in a sunken city in the South Pacific. He looks like a cross between a dragon, a giant octopus, and a man. He’s got a scaly body, tentacles, short wings, and the top of his head is vaguely human. You’ve probably seen some concept art. Cthulhu is related to the Elder Gods, an ancient race from space who will someday come back and wipe humanity off the Earth and restore themselves as rulers. There are secret religious cults on Earth who chant to Cthulhu and look forward to his return. The narrator of the story discovers all this while investigating some strange notes left by his granduncle, a professor who died unexpectedly. After his investigation, our narrator realizes that he knows too much — now he’s a target of the Cthulhu cult, too.

In the second story, “The Hound” (Weird Tales, 1924), a couple of friends who are bored with the normal pleasurable pursuits of life turn to graverobbing and build a museum filled with the objects of necromancy they uncover. When they steal a jade amulet from a grave, they begin hearing the baying of a hound, and things go badly from there. This story, which feels very much like Edgar Allan Poe and a little like The Hound of the Baskervilles, is notable because it’s the first to mention Lovecraft’s famous fictional grimoire, The Necronomicon.

The third story is “The Dunwich Horror” (Weird Tales, 1929). It tells the tale of Wilbur Whateley, the child of a deformed albino mother who grows up supernaturally fast in a backwater village in Massachusetts where, because of inbreeding, the natives have regressed into degeneracy and perversity. Nobody knows who Wilbur’s father is, but his grandfather seems to be indoctrinating him into some sort of evil. There are strange things going on in Wilbur’s room and the boy is obsessed with getting a copy of The Necronomicon. Eventually, things go bad, as we knew they would. This story is significant because it introduces Yog-Sothoth, one of the Outer Gods of the Cthulhu mythos, and gives us some more ideas about what’s in The Necronomicon.

In the last story, “Dagon” (The Vagrant, 1919) an opium-addicted mariner plans to kill himself because he’s haunted by visions of Dagon, the Philistine fish-god, whom he saw inside a volcano-like island in the South Pacific. He fears the creatures of the sea and worries about the future of mankind.

I have to admit that I’m not H.P. Lovecraft’s biggest fan. I’m occasionally in the mood for his creepy atmospheric tales, and sometimes he genuinely scares the heck out of me, but mostly I read him occasionally as an academic exercise — just to be well-versed enough in the Cthulhu mythos to get by. I find him too repetitive in theme, plot, and style. His narrators often sound like the same person (some curious white male scholar), the same images and motifs are used to frighten us, and often the same words are used, though sometimes it seems like Lovecraft has plundered the thesaurus for every possible synonym of words like rot, mold, decay, malignant, sinister, stench, charnel, repellant, abhorrent, repulsive, cursed, unholy, grotesque, terror… I could go on. In each story one or more characters are on the verge of a descent into madness due to the horrors or the “terrifying vistas of reality” they’ve seen.

Another issue is the elitism and racism — something I’ve noticed from other horror writers of the early 20th century. Lovecraft equates lack of beauty, physical deformity, and mixed-bloodedness with low intelligence, violent tendencies, and bad morals. He talks negatively about people who are chinless or have thick lips, coarse crinkly hair, or large pores. It doesn’t matter if we “expect” this from early 20th century writers — it’s still ugly.
But, as I said at the beginning, everyone must read a little Lovecraft and this is a great collection in audio format with an excellent reader.

143 sur 158 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • brett
  • 01/10/2012

Buy when it is on special , don't use up a credit

My first reading of HPL . I enjoyed the second and third stories best .
I thought "The Call of Cthulhu" would have been longer .
I enjoyed this but it might be a while before I come back to HPL as
I have other classics I have been meaning to get to .

24 sur 26 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Eyers
  • 23/05/2012

Chilling classic read in bite-sized form

Lovecraft's stories are among the best horror ever written, but the performance really makes the mood come alive with these. The stories are in small-ish pieces, so its easy to drop and come back to, or listen to one before bed.

11 sur 12 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Fycadius
  • 21/12/2011

An excellent read of a legendary story.

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would recommend this audiobook to those who want a glimpse into the twisted world of the Old Ones.

What other book might you compare Call of Cthulhu and Other Stories to and why?

I would compare it to the other book I purchased: Herbert West, Reanimator. All four have a dense, thick and morbid similarity to them.

Which scene was your favorite?

I liked the most at the very end of Dagon, when all he says is

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

None really, it's not meant to move you.

Any additional comments?

It's a very well read audiobook that I would recommend earnestly to anyone who's interested in the paranormal and power of the imagination as you, the reader, try to come to terms with a novel that never truly explains the NATURE of the villain.

10 sur 11 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Robert
  • 20/09/2012

Rather Middling

Lovecraft himself regarded this short story as "rather middling—not as bad as the worst but full of cheap and cumbrous touches". Personally, that was kind of my take on the story. The book is primarily a narrative, almost void of any dramatic dialogue played by an exciting performer. The tone of the narrative is one of shocked excitement, grotesqueness and gothic horror.

Lovecraft was one of the first writers to create a mythos throughout his works, linking up disparate short stories to make a larger one. The monster Cthulhu is at the center of that mythos which contains a loose pantheon of ancient, powerful deities from space who once ruled the Earth and who have since fallen into a deathlike sleep.

Living characters in the story never set eyes on the actual creature. Instead, they see Cthulhu either in dreams or in artwork. The narrator of the story says that a statue of Cthulhu resembled, in part, an octopus, a dragon and a human-like or anthropomorphic creature. From this description, artists and sculptors have created artwork depicting the monster with a head that looks like an octopus and a massive pair of wings attached to his back. In the story we find that Cthulhu had once ruled the Earth and would someday do so again. We learn from the narrator that Cthulhu was trapped in a stone city beneath the ocean, but an earthquake pushed part of the city back above the surface. Although Cthulhu did not awaken, he was able to make contact with the minds of particularly creative or insane people unlike the minds of those more rational or mundane. We learn that after a massive storm, the city once again sank in the ocean, and Cthulhu apparently lies dreaming once more.

The story also introduces the Cult of Cthulhu, an organization of humans who are convinced of Cthulhu's eventual return who work to hasten it. Cthulhu will rise up and rule over Earth and mankind will cast aside concepts of civilization and inhibition. Chaos will ensue, and men will revel in their concupiscence.

I know that Lovecraft and his Cthulhu reign high in the ranks of SF literature. It is always difficult for a reviewer to give a piece such as this anything less that a maximally steller rating. But personally, the work has not stood the test of time (~1930). The writing is good enough but again, it's one that is almost totally narrative in style with a tone that never seems to stray from that of horror and the grotesque. That's just not my cup of tea. The narrator was good enough. His drama and inflection adequate. Perhaps that's just the best way to describe it: adequate... "rather middling—not as bad as the worst..."

19 sur 22 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • L'Aura
  • 28/04/2012

First Exposure to Lovecraft and I'm VERY Pleased

Any additional comments?

I've heard about HP Lovecraft over the years and recently even tried reading some of his books, but just didn't get into it - I don't make a lot of time for reading so when I do it's something I will enjoy. However, I have plenty of time for audiobooks and this is a great one! The narrator does a great job with accents, tempo, vocal sound effects, and emotion. And I now know why Lovecraft is spoken so well of! Great, fun horror stories from the 1800s.

11 sur 13 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Myusollo
  • 31/10/2014

Not Lovecraft's best stories, but a good entry.

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

I would be much more inclined to recommend virtually anything else that Lovecraft wrote first. Call of Cthulhu has become his most well-known work, but it is not his best by a long shot. To be fair, this recording also includes The Dunwich Horror, which is a much better story, so your time would not be wasted if you bought this audiobook on sale. This reader does an excellent job of making the weaker works more engaging than the print versions, so I would probably recommend this version over the print version.

Was Call of Cthulhu and Other Stories worth the listening time?

I would say so. I like Lovecraft, but I've never been crazy about Call of Cthulhu itself. Hearing William Roberts' performance, however, did improve the material in my esteem.

9 sur 11 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Brett
  • 17/03/2013

A masterpiece of Horror

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes but it may send them mad just by listening, but such is the risk if you delve into the necronomicon or the worship of the elder gods



"Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn"

What other book might you compare Call of Cthulhu and Other Stories to and why?

i am now unable to comprehend any other books because of the infinite madness that has seeped into my mind from exposure to CTHULHU




"Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn"

What about William Roberts’s performance did you like?

The fact that he maintained his sanity whilst being so close to the necronomicon speaks volumes of this narrators will and expertise



"Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn"

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

i dont remember as i somehow ended up in this asylum in arkham with strange esoteric script written all over the walls in blood... wait.... is that ... my blood?????




"Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn"

Any additional comments?

Dont waste time reading my review JUST DOWNLOAD THIS AUDIOBOOK before the goat with a thousand young comes for you




"Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn"

20 sur 27 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Joe Kraus
  • 09/09/2016

A Lazy Aesthetic. A Silly Set of Stories

Any additional comments?

I understand that, in some quarters, these works have become canonical. Lovecraft stands like a kind of Raymond Chandler or J.R.R. Tolkien, an inventor of a genre, what we now call ‘horror.’ And I understand as well that Chandler and Tolkien are also highly stylized, that a lot of readers come to them and say, “Is this all there is?”

But, seriously, is this all there is?

These stories are laughably bad. This is, at best, second-rate Poe, and I have a lower opinion of the original, first-rate Poe than most.

For starters, Lovecraft is a lazy craftsman. These sentences are larded with adjectives. Take away his favorite obscure ones – eldritch, stygian, cyclopedian – and replace them with their essential synonym, “scary,” and you have very little.

Then the plots themselves are clumsy and unfinished. I do like the idea of getting to see Cthulu from the perspective of several different dreamers. Maybe there’d have been something to it if Lovecraft had foreseen the postmodern narrative and managed to make a consciousness of storytelling part of the narrative itself. Instead, as with most of the others here, we have a narrator who, conveniently, goes mad or kills himself just after finishing. Cthulu is out there, tentacle-faced and fearsome (or should I say tentacle-faced and eldritch) and we’re supposed to close the book, go to sleep, and have nightmares about him.

The whole effect comes down to a cheap horror movie stunt: let us catch only a glimpse, only a sense of the shadow of what’s out there. Then let us live in fear of what it might be. I find it a cynical form of narration, and a cynical aesthetic move.

Anyway, all that has made me wonder about the parallels between the horror genre in general and heavy metal music. Each is probably the genre I least appreciate – one in literature and one in music. Friends tell me Metallica is great, and I do recognize the sophistication of their work. Still, I hear mostly just noise and anger, a noise that seems intended to bully me into submission, and an anger that seems to want to enlist me in causes I don’t share.

And maybe it’s true that Stephen King is the analogue of Led Zeppelin, each the most successful out of the genre. Each supposedly competent in ways I can only distantly see. And each spawning admirers who fall far short.

If all that’s true, if horror is a genre predicated on an aesthetic that troubles me from the start, fine. I’ll leave it to others without judgement.

Except, Lovecraft. Really? I think his analogue may be Slade.

I have gone with two stars, the second coming to acknowledge the influence and for the sheer stupid ambition of the work.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.