• The Inevitable

  • Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future
  • De : Kevin Kelly
  • Lu par : George Newbern
  • Durée : 11 h et 30 min
  • Version intégrale Livre audio
  • Date de publication : 07/06/2016
  • Langue : Anglais
  • Éditeur : Penguin Audio
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars (13 notations)

Prix : 30,21 €

Détails de l'abonnement : Détails de l'abonnement :
  • Gratuit pendant 30 jours, avec un titre au choix offert.
  • 9,95 € par mois pour le livre audio de votre choix, quel que soit le prix.
  • Vous n'aimez pas un titre ? Échangez-le.
  • Résiliez à tout moment, vos livres audio vous appartiennent.
ou
Dans le panier

Description

From one of our leading technology thinkers and writers, a guide through the 12 technological imperatives that will shape the next 30 years and transform our lives.

Much of what will happen in the next 30 years is inevitable, driven by technological trends that are already in motion. In this fascinating, provocative new book, Kevin Kelly provides an optimistic road map for the future, showing how the coming changes in our lives - from virtual reality in the home to an on-demand economy to artificial intelligence embedded in everything we manufacture - can be understood as the result of a few long-term accelerating forces. Kelly both describes these deep trends - flowing, screening, accessing, sharing, filtering, remixing, tracking, and questioning - and demonstrates how they overlap and are codependent on one another. These larger forces will completely revolutionize the way we buy, work, learn, and communicate with each other. By understanding and embracing them, says Kelly, it will be easier for us to remain on top of the coming wave of changes and to arrange our day-to-day relationships with technology in ways that bring forth maximum benefits.

Kelly's bright, hopeful book will be indispensable to anyone who seeks guidance on where their business, industry, or life is heading - what to invent, where to work, in what to invest, how to better reach customers, and what to begin to put into place - as this new world emerges.

©2016 Kevin Kelly (P)2016 Penguin Audio

Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

Notations

Global

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    9
  • 4 étoiles
    3
  • 3 étoiles
    1
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    7
  • 4 étoiles
    4
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Histoire

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    8
  • 4 étoiles
    2
  • 3 étoiles
    1
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0
Trier par :
  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Un must absolu pour qui aime la technologie

Détaillé, factuel, mnis aussi très conceptuel ! Ce livre est magistral. Il a ravi le geek qui sommeille en moi !

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

Trier par :
  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Michael
  • 20/02/2017

Predicting is hard, especially about the future

The author uses twelve verbs to frame the inevitable forces shaping our future.
These are:
Becoming: Things will change faster
Cognifying: Things will have intelligence
Flowing: Things will be streamed
Screening: Things will be on screens
Accessing: Things will be on the cloud
Sharing: Things will be Shared and collaboratively created
Filtering: Things will be personalized
Remixing: Things will be edited and remixed
Interacting: Virtual Reality will increase
Tracking: Things will be tracked
Questioning: Questions will be more important than answers
Beginning: Things will continue changing

This is largely just a survey of current and cutting edge technologies and predicts these trends will continue and accelerate. I think history shows this is the easiest. most common, and most commonly wrong, form of prediction. The author has a quite positive outlook on the future, but it is not clear this optimum is well founded.

The author puts a lot into the cognifying verb. This includes robots and all of Artificial Intelligence. Yes this will continue, but the specifics and consequences are difficult to predict.

The best chapter was the last which makes clear just how much we don't know.

My main takeaway from this was we really don't know what is Inevitable plus ONE interesting idea. One of my concerns about the future has been that throughout history insulated societies have become somewhat stagnant until they came in contact with a quite different culture than a period of transformation occurs. With global information sharing, I feared this pattern might come to an end (unless we bump into some aliens). Instead Kelly points out we don't need aliens. We will build them in the form of AI, and the pattern will not only continue, but accelerate. I was chagrined that I did not think of this myself.

The narration is quite good but most of the ideas seem a bit trite.

41 sur 42 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • George J. Peacock
  • 01/08/2016

Most Important Book I'll Read This Year

This book was written at a level where it could be accessible to anyone, and that's perfect, because everyone should read it. I am absolutely blown away by what I've learned, and feel that I'd be very much in the dark moving into the future if I hadn't read it. Technological shifts are about to irreversibly alter the way humanity exists, and Kevin gives a brilliant and informative glimpse into that coming world. Highly recommend.

19 sur 20 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Zoran
  • 22/07/2016

You should set your expectations right

Kevin Kelly describes his meeting with inventor of hypertext Ted Nelson. He talks about Nelson's convoluted sketches of hypertext and with even some irony telling how nobody even dreamed off what will it become and what will be driving force of the web.

I think that this book should be treated the same... Kevin Kelly gives some convoluted sketches of future development and hypotheses on directions and driving forces and try to imagine how all that will look like but most probably from distance of 20-30 years we will look at those hypothesis and say wow that was a wild guess and it was so wrong but still there was something.

Just for the sake that there might be something I give 5 stars, performance is also excellent but overall still 4 stars for the frustrations of oversimplifying some things pr omitting important moments.

15 sur 16 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Mark
  • 01/08/2016

Clever bloke

No single person can reliably predict the future.

If you review past predictions about the present, they are always massively wrong, with a few tid-bits of accuracy. Some things are obvious: the population will increase, technology will improve, etc., but there are always events, ideas, developments and emergent properties that no single person’s brain is likely to be able to predict (a panel of experts wouldn’t do much better either).

What’s good about this book is that the author outlines the general trends and directions in which the future is likely to develop – from a technological perspective that is – so this book talks a lot about what will happen to the internet, along with many other technological subjects like robots and artificial intelligence. He classifies this into several themes: ‘flowing, screening, accessing, sharing, filtering, remixing, tracking and questioning’ and then discusses each of these in turn. Actually, now I come to think about it, the book is really about the future of INFORMATION technology rather than the future of technology in general.

Because the focus is mostly on information technology rather than on wider geopolitical, social or environmental issues, he doesn’t really make an attempt to predict what will happen regarding major problems affecting the future of humanity and the planet: population growth, poverty, global warming, pollution, loss of biodiversity, warfare, space exploration etc., but he does present a well-reasoned, imaginative and entertaining discussion of how the future of information technology might develop. I enjoyed it.

21 sur 24 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Dan Collins
  • 16/08/2016

Interesting but not Arresting

The concept of the book is solid. And it is written well. I got the impression that the author might have been stretching for material as opposed to stretching to get to all the material. This book attempts to bring into focus trends, not technologies. I wish the author had done it with fewer words. But I also cannot deny that the lengths he went to to make the case for the trends he argues for is comprehensive and compelling.

19 sur 22 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • A. Yoshida
  • 30/12/2017

Will reshape your thinking about technology

The technological trends are: becoming, cognifying, flowing, screening, accessing, sharing, filtering, remixing, interacting, tracking, questioning, and beginning. It's hard to grasp these concepts described with verbs but the book contains a lot of good information. For example, becoming is about ever-changing technologies. The apps, smartphones, etc. that we used (or that didn't even exist) several years ago are not the same ones that we are using now. We are constantly becoming new users... getting familiar with the new features and changes to get back to the state of being a proficient user again. Cognifying could be better described as artificial intelligence. Flowing is about product evolution. We used to think of music in physical terms, like an album or CD. But now music could be digital downloads or a subscription to Spotify. Products are flowing from a fixed state (like hardcopy books, where all copies are exactly the same) to a fluid state (like eBooks, which can be customized to the readers' preference on their devices and corrected through updates). This book will reframe your paradigm of what exactly is the product or service. For example, do we want a car or do we really want a transportation service (like Uber or Lyft)?

5 sur 6 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • EMDoc
  • 14/06/2016

Not worth the time

This book is incredibly general and really written for an audience with minimal involvement in technology. The first and last chapters are the only ones with substance and are rehashing of ideas in Kelly's prior book: "What technology wants". Just listen to that book and be done.

27 sur 36 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Dingle
  • 26/06/2016

Like listening to one long list after another

There were several interesting ideas in the book. However, I was expecting more of a Malcolm Gladwell type of writing and felt like I got one long list after another of where screens will exist in the future as an example.

15 sur 20 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Valeriy R.
  • 08/06/2016

Worth it's weight in gold

Has tons of very interesting and incredibly useful information! It's like if somebody in early 90's wrote a book, about how powerful e-commerce, social networks, user generated videos, crowdfunding, etc. are going to be.

15 sur 21 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • shelby
  • 16/08/2016

Required reading

I think this book is incredible important for my generation and the generation preceding it. Many people are still looking at our technology as simply tools without understanding the paradigm shifts and impact of our internet age developments.

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

Trier par :
  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Tony Mara
  • Salzburg
  • 17/02/2017

wow. hats off, Kevin.

absolutelY BRILLIANT ideas and insights. Kevin lays out our future in entertaining and strikingly precise language

1 sur 1 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Ole K.
  • 30/11/2016

Inspiring book

I loved it to get new ideas every couple of minutes. The future will be awesome and interesting and this is a way to get a glimpse of what will come.

2 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Martin
  • 27/11/2016

Truely visionary ...

... viewing the future from remote, realizing it already started.
Fascinating, scary, eye-opening, realistic all at once.

2 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Honey
  • 13/10/2016

Best audiobook ever

Was hat Ihnen am allerbesten an The Inevitable gefallen?

This is the best story of this year plus a super clear speaker - just makes you understand more about this world and our future. Everyone should hear/read this!!

2 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Miroslav Petkov Georgiev
  • 04/06/2018

way too optimistic

I find the book to be OK. but maybe it misses many points where a discussion is needed. The book is just a mere presentation of how the author imagined the future and it does not provide any inside on how to deal with that future. No critical assessment of how AI and humans will collaborate. That issue is discussed in the last chapter for about 5 min.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Information-und-Gesellschaft
  • Wolfegg
  • 05/03/2018

interesting thoughts about the future of the web

this book brought many new thoughts to me about how our society is shaped in the future by the internet. I can strongly recommend it to everybody who is interested in this topic.

  • Global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Leib Michael
  • 06/10/2017

<br />Fascinating story, well thought out.

Some deep and well thought out insights about where technology is going. I highly recommend it to anyone who is interested in where technology is going and why.

  • Global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Paul Von Kirchbach
  • Hamburg, Deutschland
  • 07/09/2017

too much bullshit and not enough critical thinking

the author is too busy staying positive to critical analyse pros and cons. there are way better books on the topic.

  • Global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Facchinelli Federico
  • 31/08/2017

Interesting trends, but mixed up in the chapters

The book is OK, and it identifies clear trends, some of which are already clearly happening, explaining their origin and their consequences and the potential future developments.
The trends are however mixed up in the various chapters, and sometimes similar concepts are repeated.
Overall still OK, but not great.

  • Global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon-Kunde
  • 24/08/2017

Eigentlich interessant aber zu sehr sozialistisch

Man würde meinen dass jemand der so viele technische Veränderungen miterlebt hat, dem Sozialismus nicht so aufgeschlossen wäre. Stattdessen wird hier in 3 Kapiteln versucht Technologie als Sozialistische Errungenschaft darzustellen und den Begriff des Sozialismus zu verwässern. Es reicht anscheinend nicht, dass mehr als 100 Millionen Menschen aufgrund dieser Ideologie bereits gestorben sind. Nein, auch das Internet, dass durch Freiwilligkeit und Offenheit den Lebensstandard von gefühlt 1 Milliarde Menschen verbessert hat, in den roten Dreck gezogen werden muss. Keine Empfehlung.

1 sur 3 personne(s) ont trouvé cet avis utile.